(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Sessional papers of the Dominion of Canada 1906"

SU'f' )fea:ae»m.Ciiii.B. 




/ a fc^/y /'//^ 



1 



SESSIONAL PAPERS 



. VOLUME 14 



SECOND SESSION OF THE TENTH PARLIAMENT 



OF THE 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



SESSION 1906 




VOLUME XL 






Iq^f * X 



5 Edw. VII. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1906 



*s"See also Numerical List, page 5. 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX 
OF THE 



SESSIONAL PAPERS 



iiV THE 



PARLIAMENT OF CANADA 



SECOND SESSION, TENTH PARLIAMENT. 190G. 



Accidents and Casualties 

Adulteration of Food 

Agriculture, Annual Report . 

Ahearn & Super 

Alberta ami Arthabasca Lands 

Alberta Coal Lands 

American Bank Note Co 

Anthracite Coal 

Archives, Canadian 

Astronomer, Report of the Chief. . 
Auditor General, Annual Report 
Aylmer Post Office 



.159, 



Banks, Chartered <i 

Banks, Unpaid Balances in 7 

Bavarian, Wreck of the _ol>,i 

Blood Indian Reserve 157 

Bonds and Securities 62 

British Canadian Loan and Investment Co. 51 

British Columbia! Sale of Young Girls in. . 139 

By -Elections, House of Commons 37 

C 

Caldwell, C. F 177 

< '. i Eastern Railway 164 

Canadian Northern Railway Co. . 188, l ss ' 
Canadian Pacific Railway : — 

Businesswith Interior Department HI 

Lands sold by 52 

Statistics 20a 

la, L901. Third Volume. . .Vol. C, 
Fourth Volume Vol. D. 

I ered Banks lj 

Chicoutimi Pulp Co 149 

1 



WO 


Civil Service: — 






14 


Appointments and Promotions 


63 to 636 


15 






31 


191 




1" 


158 


List 


... 30 


177 


Post Office Department . 




78 


170 


Superannuations 




... 41 


47 






8 197 


18 


Collingwood Dry Duck Co 
Colonization Companies 




115 


256 




121a 


1 


Contracts for Railway Sup| 


ilies 


7o 


97 


Cornwall Canal 




1SL' 




Cowie'sDam, N.S 




l:i.-, 




Criminal Statistics 




. .> 17 



Darroch. Alexander »*,'.» 

1 latum Planes, Pacific Coast. . _'l . 

Davidson, Colonel A. D 130, 130a, 135 

" Der Nordwester" Publishing Co 192 

Dividends Unpaid in Banks . ... 7 

Dominion Lands 25a, 56, 57, 112, 131, 133, 
134. 138, no. 158, Hi'J, 166, 198, 199, 200, :.'".', 

Dominion Police :,o 

Dredging in Ontario . . 98 

i ■■ jing of the Saguenay 203 

Drugs ami Proprietary Medicines 125 



E 

Electric Litjht. Inspection i t 

Elgin Mail < lontracta 

Emerson Customs ' Officials 

l'.-t iinatet 

I.- pel Imental Farms 



13 
186 
176 

16 



5 Edw. VII, 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1906 



Fisheries. Annual Report ■ • 22 

Fish Exports 116 

Flour for Penitentiaries 65 

Food for Militia 118,118a 

Fruit Exports 123-1234 

G 

Gas, Inspection of 13 

Geographic Board -1" 

Geological Smvey Report 26 

Georgian Bay Ship Canal 172 

German Tariff 207 

Germany, Exports to 71 

Giant's Tomb Island 129 

Olace Bay Harbour 104 

Governor General's Warrants 13 

Grind Trunk Co.. Arbitration with 169 

Grand Trunk Pacific Railway :— 

Mining Rights 156 

Report of Collingwood Schreibcr 45a 

Surveys, Quebec ami Moncton 83a 

Grazing Leases 92 

Great Northern Railway 142 

H 

Harbour Commissioners 23 

Hatfield. Charles M 174 

Hay, W. H 68 

High Court of Ontario 59 

Hog Plague 175 

Somesti ad Entries 84, 91 to 91rf 

Homestead Inspectors 81 

Hospital for Trachoma 204 

Hon E Commons Employees .. 114,114a 

Hudf Bay Co 189 

I 
Immigration Commissioner, England 144,144". 163 

Imperial Institute 68 

Imperial Intelligence Service 67 

■ A. ■: 64 

Indian Affairs, Annual Report. 27 

Indian Landa 196, 196a 

Indians, Particulars as to . . 152 

Inland Revenue, Annual Report 12 

Insurance, Abstract 9 

Insurance Act, etc 108 1084 

Insurance, Annual Report 8 

in 38, 66 666 

Occidents 190 

Interior, Annual Report 26 

International Waterways . 196 to 19d 

,ii Labonrei ....... 126 

J 

James Bay Railway 72 

Japanese Treaty 117 

Judges, ' hrculai to .... . . ... 99 

Judges. Money paid to 58 

Judges, Particulars as to 99a 

\ anual Repot I 34 



King's Regulations for Militia 184 

L 
Labour, Department of, Annual Report ... 36 

Lake Manitoba 153 

Lake Ocebe Lighthouse 94 

Lands in North-West . . .101, 112, 112a,131, 

133, 134, 138, 140, 198, 199, 205 

Leth bridge, Strike in 80 

Library of Parliament, Annual Report... . 33 

Liddle David 55 

Life Insurance Commission 38, 66 

Life Insurance, Finance Department ... 165 

M 

Macdonald. R. C 53 

Mail Subsidies 10a 

Manitoba " Free Press " 192 

Marine, Annual Report 21 

Mi asures, Inspection of . . 13 

Mexico Steamboat Service 120 

Militia and Defence, Annual Report G5 

Militia Regulations 184,184a 

Miminegash Harbour 173 

Mines, Inspection of . . . 26a 

Montreal Turnpike Trust . 76 

Mounted Police 28, 28a 

Murray Harbour Branch -Railway 102 

Mutual Reserve Life Association 105, 168 



National Transcontinental Railway. 45 to I"-/. • 

Naturalization of Aliens 86 

Nixon, Joseph HI 

North Sy Iney, Harbour Cod 167 

N irth-West Territi iries :— 

Land Patents 112, 162, 200 

LandSales 101,112, 112.7. 131. 133,184, 

138, 140, 198, 1!'!'. 205 

Lands Surveyed 166 

Mounted Police 28 - 

Sanction to purchase land 151 



Ontario High Court 59 

Ottawa In: provement Commission 54 

Ottawa Post Office 103 

Over-rulings of Treasury Board 44 



Pacific Cable Board 

IV,!, Mail Contracts in 107 

Penitentiaries, Annual Report . 84 

Petuwawa Damp .... loo 

119, 119a 

Pilot Commissioners 154,201 

. I ' minion 50 

v.i.'h-w eel Mounted 88, 28a 

Port Bruce Barbour. 160 

Port Burwell Harbour 188 

lVrt Colborne Harbour 108 



5 Edw. VII. 



Alphabetical Index to Sessional Papers. 



A. 1906 



Port Stanley Harbour 171 

Postmaster General, Annual Report 24 

Prince Edward Island :— 

Additional Subsidy 93 

Coffin, David D 77d 

Freight Rates 160 

French Village 79 

Hodgson Property 116 

Lands expropriated 113 

McCabe, Joseph 77 

New Steamer 179 

North Lake Post Office 117 

Power, James 77a 

Smith, Sarah 77c 

Stanley Bridge Branch 122 

Wages on Rail way 181 

Weeks, W. A 82 

Winter Navigation . . - 178 

Printers, British 73, 100 

Proprietary Medicines 125 

Provincial Railways 187 

Provincial Subsidies 96 

Public Accounts, Annual Report 

Public Printing and Stationery 32 

Public Works, Annual Report 19 

Public Works, Expenditure 4G, 40a 

<t 

Qu'Appelle, Long Lake and Saskatchewan 

Co 1126,112c 

Quarantine in Kent County 175 

Quebec Bridge and Railway Co 74 

B 

Railway Accidents 159, 190 

Railways and Canals, Annual Report 20 

Railway Statistics 2(16 

Railway Supplies 70 

Riding Mountain Timber Reserve 148 

Rirm, Joseph 197 

Ross Rifle Co 124 

Royal Military College 3.« 

Royal North- West Mounted Police 28, 28u 

Rural Mail Delivery 88 

. S 

Saguenay, Dredging of the 203 

Saskatchewan Valley Land Co 132 

Secretary of State, Annual Report 29 

Senate Employees Ill'' 

Shareholders in Chartered Banks C 

Shipping, List of 211 

Songhees Indians 145 

Sorel Wharf 193 



Spain, Commander 180 

Speaker's Apartments, H. of C 206 

Speers, C. W., Report of 130, 130a 

Steamship Subventions .... 10a 

St. Mary's River 136 

Supreme Court Order 48 

Surveyor General, Dominion Lands 25a 

Sydney Pilot Commissioners 154, 201 

T 

Tariff Inquiry Commission ." 49 

Temperance Colonization Society 121, 121a 

Thames River. 127 

Thermograph Records 110 

Thorndale Post Office 89 

Tide Levels, Pacific Coast 21c 

Ties Purchased 185 

Timber Lands 39, 90, 113, 199 

Tower, Collapse of 87, 161-1616 

Trachoma, Hospital for 204 

Trade and Commerce, Annual Report 10 

Trade and Navigation, Annual Report 11 

Transcontinental Railway. ..45 to 45d, 83, 83a, 194 

Transportation, Royal Commission on 19a 

Treasury Board Over-ruliugs. 44 

Treaty, Great Britain and Japan 117 

Trent Canal 95, 95a, 119, 119a 

Trust Funds of Canada 75 

V 

Unclaimed Balances in Banks 7 

Unforeseen Expenses 40 

United States, Imports and Export* 137 

V 

Vessels, List of 216 

Veterinary Director General, Report of. . . 15« 

Victoria Memorial Museum 128 

W 

Wagner, Philip 141 

Walsh, Patrick 77ft 

Waterways, International ... . ... 196 to 19rf 

Weights, Measures, etc 13 

Wharfs, Docks, etc 46, 4fia 

Wharfs Transferred 85 

Winnipeg Printers 100 

Wreck of the Bavarian 202a 

Wrecks in the St. Lawrence 202 



Yukon : — 

Indian Reserves l.vj 

Ordinances 60 

Rainfall 171 



1.'. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Toronto 



http://www.archive.org/details/n14sessionalpaper40canauoft 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



See also Alphabetical Index, page 1. 

LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS 

Arranged in Numerical Order, with their titles at full length ; the Dates whin Ordered 
and when presented to the Bouses of Parliament ; the Name of the Senator or 
Member who moved for each Sessional Paper, and whether it is ordered to be 
Printed or Not Printed. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME C. 

Fourth Census of Canada, 1901. Third Volume.— Manufactures. Presented 24th April, 1906, by Hon. S. 
A. Fisher .... Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME D. 

Fourth Census of Canada, 1901. Fourth Volume. —Vital Statistics. School Attendance. Status Dwellings 
and Families. Institutions. Churches and Schools, Electoral Districts and Representation. Pre- 
sented 24th April, 1906, by Hon. S. A. Fisher Printed for l-oth distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 1. 

(This volume is bound in two parts.) 

1. RejKirt of the Auditor General, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905. Partial report presented 

12th, 14th and 26th March, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 2. 

2. PiiUie Accor.nt- of Canada, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905. Presented 12th March, 1906, by 

Sir Wilfrid Laurier Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

3. Estimates of the sums required for the services of Canada for the nine months ending 31st March, 

1907. Preai nted 12th March. 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Pruded for both distribution and sessional papers. 

4. Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1906. Presented 12th March, 1906, by Sir 

Wilfrid Laurier . Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

4a. Further Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1906. Pr esented 20th April, l'.HMi, 
by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

4b. Further Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1906. Presented 20th June, 1906, 
by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

6. Further Supplementary Estimates for the year ending 30th June, 1906. Presented 24th April, 1906, 
by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution ami sessional papers. 

5a. Supplementary Estimate- for the nine months ending 31st March, 19o". Presented 20th June, 1906, 
by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

6. List of Shareholders in the Chartered Banks of Canada, as on the 31st December, 1905. Presented 
30th April, 1906, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

5 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 3. 

7. Report of dividends remaining unpaid, unclaimed balances and unpaid drafts and bills of exchange in 

Chartered Banks of Canada, for five years and upwards, prior J;o December 31, 1905. Presented 
28th May, 1906, by Hon.'W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

8. Report of the Superintendent of Insurance for the year ended 31st December, 1905. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

9. Abstract of Statements of Insurance Companies in Canada, for the year ended 31st December, 1905. 

Presented 23rd April, 1906, by Hon W. S. Fielding. 

Printed/or loth dislr ' sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 4. 

10. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905. Pre- 

sented 12th March. 1906, by H-m. W. Paterson. .. Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

10a. Mail Subsidies and Steamship Subventions. Supplement to the Report of the Department of Trade 

and Commerce, for the year ended 3uth June, 1905. Presented 29th May. 1906, by Hon. W. 

Paterson Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 5 

1 1. Tables of the Trade and Navigation of Canada, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905. Presented 

12th March, 1906, by Hon. W. Paterson Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

12. Inland Revenues of Canada. Excise, etc., for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905. Presented 15th 

March, 1906, by Hon L. P. Brodeur Printed for both distribution a n papers. 

1 3. Inspection of Weights, Measures, Gas and Electric Light, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905 

Presented 15th March, 1906, by Hon. L. P. Brodeur. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papirs. 

14. Report on Adulteration of Fund, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 190O. Presented 25th April, 

1906, by Hon. W. Templeman Printed for both distribute rnal papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 6. 

15. Rejiort of the Min ster of Agriculture, for the year ended 31st October, 1905. Presented 10th April, 

1906, by Hon. S. A. Fisher. ... - Printed for both distribution •mil sessional papers. 

15a. Report of the Veterinary Director General, 1905.. Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

16. Re|».it .if tin- Director and Officers of tie- Experimental Farms, for tie- year 190.".. Presented 10th 

April, 1906, by Hon. S. A. Fisher Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

17. Criminal Statistic- for the year ended 30th September. 1905. 

fruited for both distribution and sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 7. 

(This volume is bound in three parts.) 

18. Report on Canadian Archives, 1905 Printed for loth distribute tional paper S. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 8. 

in. Report of the Minister of Public Works, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1906. Presented 301 
March, 1906, by Son. II. R. Eminerson Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

lit.. Report of the Royal Commission mi Transportation. Presented 17th Vpril, 1906, by 11. .n. C. S. 
Hyman Printed fur loth distribution and sessional ixipi rs. 

19'-. Report of the Commission on International Waters 

Print'd for both distribution and sessional papers. 
6 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papeis. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 8— Concluded. 

19'\ (1) Report from the International Waterways Commission on Conditions as to Niagara Fails, and 
their recommendations in relation thereto. (2) Report of the Commission upon conditions existing 
at Sault Ste. Marie, with rules for the control of the same recommended by the Commission. Pre- 
sented 4th May, 1906, by Hon. C. S. Hyman. . Printed for both distribution and ■ sional papers. 

19c 1 . Second Interim Report of the Canadian Section of the International Waterways Commission. Pre- 
sented 4th May, 1906,jjy Hon. C. S. Hyman Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

20. Annual Re]>ort of the Department of Railways and Canals, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905. 

Presented 12th March. 1906, by Hon. H. R. Emmerson. 

Printed for both distribution ami sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 9. 

20<t. Canal Statistics for the season of navigation, 1904. Presented 23rd March, 1906, by Sir Frederick 
Borden Printed for both distribut ion a ml .■■■< ssmnal paju ,-.-. 

20'*. Railway Statistics of Canada for the year ended 30th June. 1905. Presented 26th April, 1906, by 
Hon. H. R. Einmerson Printed for both distribution air/ sessional papt r . 

21. Report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries (Marine), for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 

1905. Presented 9th April, 1906, by Hon. L. P. Brodeur 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

21a. Sixth Annual Report of the Geographic Board of Canada, containing all decisions to. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

21'/. List of Shipping issued by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, being a list of vessels on the 
registry books of Canada, on the 31st December, 1905. Presented 29th May, 1906, by Hon. R. 
Lemieux - Printed for both distribution ami st 881 mai papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 10. 

21c. Tide Levels and Datum Planes of the Pacific Coast of Canada. Presented 1st May, 1906, by Hon. 
W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribution and sessional pap. ,-.-. 

22. Report; of the Department of Marine and Fisheries (Fisheries), for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 

1905. Presented 23rd March. 1906, by lion. S. A. Fisher. 

Printed/or bath disiributi.m ami sessioiuJ papers. 

23. Report of the Harbour Commissioners, etc., 1905. . . .Printed far boll, distribution ami sessional papers. 

24. Report of the Postmaster General, for the year ended 30th June. 1905. Presented 14th March, 1906, 

by Hon. A. B. Aylesworth Printed for both distribution ami sessional papi 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 11. 

25. Annual Report of the Department of the Interior, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905. Presen- 

ted 28th March, 1906, by Hon. W. Paterson Printed for both distribution and sessional /«/» rs. 

25a. Report of the Surveyor General of Dominion Lands fur the year ending 30th June, 1905. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers, 

25b. Report of the Chief Astronomer, for the year ending 30th June, 1905. 

Printed for both distribution ami sessional papers. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME 12. 

26. Summary Report of the Geological Survey Department for the calendar year 1905. 

Printed or both distribution 

26ft. Report on the inspection "f Mines Printedfor both distribution \al papers 

27. Animal Report of the Department of Indian Affairs, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1905. Pn 

sen ted 26th March, 1906, by lion. F. Oliver . . Printnl for both distribution and sessional poj 

7 



5 tdw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 13. 

2S. Report of the Royal North-west Mounted Police. 1905. Presented 3rd May, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid 
Laurier Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

. Supplementary Report of the Royal North west Mounted Police. Mackenzie River District. 
Presented oth June. 1906. by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. . Printed for both distribution anil ■,,, rs. 

29. Rei>oit of the Secretary of State of Canada, for the year ended 31st December. 1905. Presented 30th 

June, 1906, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Printed for both distribute 'pers. 

30. Civil Service Li-- Presented 23rd March, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

31. Report of the Board of Civil Service Examiners, for the year ended 3lst December. 19 6. Presented 

Oth .July. , - , Wilfrid Laurier r both distribution an i. i pers. 

32. Annual Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery, for the year ended the 30th June, 
« 1905. Presented 25th June. 1906, by Hon. W. S. Fielding. 

/' , - I for both distribution and sessional no] 

CONTEXTS OF VOLUME 14. 

33. Report of the Joint Librarians of Parliament for the year 190.5. Pi - March, 1906, by the 

Hon. The Sjieaker Printed for ipers. 

34. Report of the Minister of J ostice as to Penitentiaries of Canada, for the ye it en l>-d 30th June, 1905. 

Presented 22nd .March. 1906, by the Hon. C. Fitzpatrick. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional paj 

:$.".. Report of the M litia Council of Canada, for the year ended 31st December, 1 uted 18th 

April, 1906, by Sir Frederick Borden Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

:!■»'. Ke|Hjrt of the Board of Vie J Military College, 1906. Presented 10th July, 1900. by Sir 
Wilfrid Laurier Printed for both distribution uU papers. 

36. Report of the Department of Labour, for the year ended 30th June, 1995. Presented loth March. 

>; Hon. A. B. Aylesworth Printed for both distribution and i pers. 

37. Return of B >f Commons of Canada, held during the year 1905. Presented 

1st May. 1906, by Sir Willi id Laurier. ... Printed for both distribution and sessional papers. 

38. Copy of a Report of a Committee of the Privy Council, approved by His Excellency the Governor 

General on the 2Sth February, 1906, on the subject of the appointment of a commission to investigate 
with res|>ect to certain matters relating tothi of life insurance in Canada ; and also copy of 

th< I to c duct an investigation into life insurance matters in Canada. 

uted 9th March. 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Printedfm both distribution and sessional papers. 

39. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 17th July. 1905, showing all timber lauds sold or 

leased by the department of the interior since 1st July. 1896 ; the description and ai lot ; 

the applications made therefor ; the notice or advertisement fi i sal tender : the tenders received : 

the amount of each ten 1. 1 ; cepted j the name and address of the person or company 

to whom each lot was sold or leased. Presented 12th March, 1906.- Mr. Foster Xot printed. 

40. Statement show ing the expenditure on account of unforeseen expenses from the 1st July. 1905, to the 

7th March, 1906, in accordance with the Appropriation Act of 1905 Presented 12th March, 1906. 

' by Sir Wilfrid Laurier Not printed. 

1 1. Statement of nuperannualions and retiring allowance* in the civil sen ioe during the year ended 31st 
Deceintier, 1905, showing name. rank, salary, service, allowance and cause of retirement of each 
person superannuated or retired, and also whether vai ancies filled by promotion or new appointment, 
and appointee. Presented l-'th March, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. .Ant .printed. 

42. Statement in pursuance of section 17 of ( 'ml Sen ice Insurance Act for tie year ending 30th dune. 

1906 Presented 12th March, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. . Not pr, 

8 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

4:i. Statement of the Governor General's Warrants issued since the last session of parliament, on account 
of the fiscal year 1905-1906. Presented 12th March, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier Not printed. 

44. Return of Treasury Board Overruling* of Auditor General's decisions, session of 1905 to session of 1 

Presented 12th March, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier Not printi d. 

4.'>. First annual report of the Board of the National Transcontinental Railway Conunisa n the 

\ ear ending 30th June, 1905. Presented 12th March. 1906, by Hon. H. R. Emmerson. 

Printed for both dis! 

45a. Report of Collingwood Schreiber, Esquire, Government Chief Engineer of the Western Division of 
the National Transcontinental Railway, on the progress being made with the surveys and works of 
co struction upon the western division of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway (Winnipeg to the Pacific 
coast). Presented 13th March, 1906, by Hon. H. R. Emmerson. 

Printed for both distribution and sessional pa 

45b. Extract from a Repoit of the Committee of the Privy Council approved by the < Governor General on 
the 17tli April, 1906, respecting the acceptance of the tender of the Dominion Bridge Company for 
the construction of a steel viaduct across Cap Rouge Valley, in District " B," in the vicinity of the 
city of Quebec, in connection with the Transcontinental Railway. Presented 17th April, 1906, by 
Sir Wilfrid Laurier Notprinied. 

45c. Extract from a Report of the Committee of the Privy Council, approved by the Governor General 
on the 14th April, 1906, respecting the acceptance of the ten tier of Mr. John D. MeArthur, for the 
construction of District " E," from a point designated on the plans of the Transcontinental Railway 
Commissioners, at or near the city of Winnipeg to a point known as Penine ir the 

junction [h out of the Fort William Branch of the Grand Trunk Pacific I. 
about 245 miles. Presented 17th April, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier Xot p. 

45il. Extract from a Report of a Committee of the Privy Council, approved by the Governor General on 
the 14th April, 1906, respecting the acceptance of the tender of Messieurs Hogan Oc Macdonell for 
the construction of 'District "B," from a point designated on the plans of the Transcontinental 
Railway Commissioners at the north end of the Quebec Bridge and Railway Company's bridge, m 
the vicinity of the city of Quebec, to a point near La Tuque, a distance of about 150 miles,' of the 
National Transcontinental Railway. Presented 17th April, 1' Wilfrid Laurier. 

Not printed. 

4t>. Statement of wharfs, docks, piers and breakwater- constructed by th( Department of Public Works 
since 1st July, 1896, with the total cost of each. Presented 13th March, 1906, by Hon. C. S. 
Hyman. /■ 

4(>.(. Statement of wharfs, docks and piers constructed by Government, 1696 1905, showing the expendi- 
ture on each such work, for repairs, from date of completion to SOth June. 1905. Pr. senti 1 13th 
March, 1906, by Hon. C. S. flyman Printed fin 

47. Return to an Order of the House of Commons, dated 17th July, 1905, showing the quantities of 

anthracite coal imi>orted into Canada in 1904, from Great Britain or elsewhere, called Scotch anthra- 
cite coal ; the various ports to which the same were brought; whether any steps were taken to 
ascertain whether the coal so imported was really anthracite, from a commercial or dutiable stand- 
point ; and if any evidence was furnished at the time or times t .f such importation as to the amount 
of carbon contained in such coal. Presented 14th March, 1906. Mr. ifacdoi " / /' 

Not i 

48. Copy of General Order No. 88, made by the judges of the Supreme Court of Canada. Presented 14th 

March, 1906, by the Hon. The Speaker Not printed 

49. Evidence taken before the Commission on the Tariff Inquiry, 1905. Pr« sented 14th March. 1906, by 

Hon. W. Paterson B 

50. Report of the Commissioner, Dominion Police Force, for the year 1905. Presented 16th March, 1906, 

by Hon. R. Lemieux S 

9 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14^-Continued. 

."> I . "-ratement of the affairs of the'British Canadian Loan and Investment Company, Limited, for the year 
ended 31st December. 1905. Also, a list of the shareholders on 31st December, 1905, in accordance 
with section 33, chapter 57, of to Victoria. Presented (Senate) 12th March, 1906, by the Hon. The 
Speaker Not printed. 

52. Return of all lands sold by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, from the 1st October, 1904, to 

the 1st October, 1905. Presented 19th March, 1906, by Hon. F. Oliver Not printed. 

53. Order in Council of the 6th January, 1906, and Reports of His Horn mr Judge Myers, on inquiry into 

charges made against R. C. Macdonald, by half-breeds of the United States in connection with 
certain scrip claimed by them. Presented 19th March, 1906, by Hun. p. Oliver Nut printed. 

54. Report of the woik i if. the < Ittawa Improvement Commission, from the date of the appointment of the 

..I,, the 21st December. 1899, to the 30th June. 1905. Presented 21st March. 1900, by 
Sir Wilfrid Laurier. . . - Print" vers. 

.">.">. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, for copies of all telegrams, 
reports, recommendations and correspondence in connection with the appointment of David Liddle 
as ;.- spector of weights and measures for the inland di\ ision of Windsor, in the province of 
Ontaiio. Presented 22nd March, 1906. — Mr. Ingram Not printed. 

56. Return of orders in council which have been published in the British Columbia Gazette, between the 

date of last return and 31st December, 1905, in accordance with the provisions of subsection {d} of 
section 38 of the regulations for the survey, administration, disposal ami management of Dominion 
lands within the 40-mile railway belt in the province of British Columbia. Presented 22nd March, 
1906, by Hon. F. Oliver Not printed. 

57. Return of orders in council «i hich have been published in the Camilla Gazette between the date of last 

return and 31st December, 1905, in accordance with the provisions of clause 91 of the Dominion 
Lands Act, chapb yj I of the Revised Statutes of ( !anada. Presented 22nd March, 1906, by Hon. 
P.Oliver Not printed. 

58. Return to an order of the Bouse of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing the several sums of 

money paid to judges, under the provisions of section 13 of an Act respecting the judges of Pro- 
vincial* 'ouit-. chapter 138, of the Revised Statutes, as amended by sections 7, 8 and 9, of chapter 
52, of the Statutes of 1898, from 30th June, 19":;. to 20th duly. 1905, and under this section and 
amendment, as enacted by section 6 of chapter 31 of tin Statutes oi 1905, from the said 20th July to 
this date: with the item- m respect of which the said several payments were made, set out and 
iwing the payments in the period before ami since 20th July. 1905. Presented 23rd 
Mai eh. 1901'.. Mr. limnox Not printed. 

59. Rules that have been passed bj the judges of the High Court of Justice for Ontario under the provi- 

sions .if the Dominion Controverted Elections Act. Presented 23rd Maroh, 1906, bySir Wilfrid 
trier Printed for sessional papers. 

60. Ordinances of the Yukon Territory, passed by the Yukon Council m the year 1905. Presented 23rd 

March, 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier Not printed. 

t; I . R. tm n (in SO far as thi I department of the Interior is concerned) of copies of all orders in cot 

plans, papers ..110 correspondence which are required to !«■ presented to the House of Commons, 
under a resolution passed on 20th February, 1882, since the date of thi last return, under such resolu- 
1 Ird March, 1906, by Hon. F. Oliver Not prii 

62. 1 >■ its nt of all bonds and securities registered in the Department of the Secretary of State 

ui Ci mda, tincelast Return, 23rd January, 1906, submitted to the Parliament of Canada under 

liapter 19, of the Revised Statutes of Canada. Presented 23rd March, 1906, by Sit 

Wilfi 1! Laurier Not printed. 

*»:{. Return 1 I thi and alaries of all persons appointed to or promoted in the several departments 

the Civil Service, during the oalendai yeai 1906. Presented 23rd Maroh, 1906, by sir Wilfrid 

rier Not printed, 

1(1 



5 Edw. Vir. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14r-Continued. 

63ft. Supplementary return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 13th March, 1905, showing 

the number of permanent appointments, male and female respectively, made to the civil service 
(inside division) in Ottawa, since 1st July, 1906; (2) the present strength of the civil service in 
Ottawa (inside division) permanent staff, specifying whether male or female ; (3) the number of 
temporary employees, male or female, on the pay-list for the inside division of the civil service at 
Ottawa for January, 1905; (4) the number of temporary employees, male or female, appointed 
since 1st July, 1896; (5) in addition to the permanent and temporary clerks at present employed 
in the public service in Ottawa, the number of artisans, labourers, or other workmen employed at 
Ottawa during the month of January, and showing to which department these men are attached. 
Presented 5th April, 1906. — Mr. Sproule . Wo 

636. Further supplementary return to No. 63a. Presented 6th April, 1906 Not pc 

64. Return showing remissions of interest made under section 141, as added to the Indian Act by section 8, 

chapter 35. 58-59 Victoria, for the year ended 30th June, 1905. Presented 26th March, 1906, by 
H m. F. Oliver Not p< 

65. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 2Sth March, 1906, for list of names of persons 

who were asked to tender, otherwise than by newspaper advertising, for flour supplied at Kingston, 
Dorchester and St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiaries, and copies of tenders received in reply to such 
request for prices. Presented 28th March, 1906.— Mr. Taylor. Not printed. 

66. Proceedings of Royal Commission on Insurance, and evidence taken to the 23rd March, instant . 

Presented 28th March, 1906, by Hon. C. Fitzpatrick Printed/or distribution. 

66r>. Further proceedings of Royal Commission on Insurance and evidence taken to the 25th April, 
instant, inclusive. Presented 27th April. 1906, by Hon. W. S. Fielding .Printed for di>tri ! - 

666. Further proceedings of Royal Commission on Insurance and evidence taken on the 4th June, instant 
inclusive. Presented 6th June, 1906, by Hon W.S.Fielding Printed for distribution. 

67. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 21st March. 11106. for copies of all letters and 

documents relating to the establishment of an Imperial Intelligence Service. Presented 28th March, 
1906. — Mr. Bdcourt Printed for both n and sessional papers. 

67a. Return to an address of the Senate, dated 8th May. 1903. of any recent correspondence with the 
Imperial Office, re Pacific Cable Board, and individuals, on the establishment of an improved intel- 
ligence service and a system of empire cables. Presented 29th May, 1906. — Hon. Mr. Ellis. 

Printed for both dittril mil papers. 

68. Report of Mr. W. H. Hay on the Imperial Institute. Presented 30th March. 1906, by Hon. S. A. 

Fisher Printed for sessional papers. 

69. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, for copie* of all telegrams, 

letters, petitions, reports, documents, recommendations, investigations, correspondence and all other 
communications concerning the appointment and removal of Mr. Alexander Darroch from the p ><i. 
ti<>n of collector of customs at St. Thomas. Ontario. Presented 30th March, 1906. — Mr Ingram. 

Not f 

70. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March. 1906, showing: 1. All contracts 

since 30th June, 1902, between the Government and (a) the Eastern Railway Supply Compan] 
the New Brunswick Petroleum Company ; {c) the Sherman Williams Paint Company ; id) the 
Maritime Wire Fencing Company,— for supplies to any of the railways of the Government 2. The 
tenders upon which such contracts were based, and all tenders made by other parties for such con- 
tracts. 3. All correspondence and communications of the railway department and officers thereof, 
with the several tenderers and contractors, relating to such tenders or contracts or supplies. AJ 
correspondence and communications between the department and its officers and between such 
officers, relating to such tenders, contracts or supplies. 4. All advertisements, notii ments 

accounts, papers and vouchers, relating to such contracts, or the supplies, or the payment thereof. 
Presented 2nd April, 1906.— .1/r. Barker Not printed . 

71. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1900. showiug our exports to Ger- 

many for each year from 1896 to 1905, inclusive, on the following articles : wheat, flour, oats, bacon, 

hams, butter, cheese and apples. Presented 4th April, 1906. — Mr. Armxtrony Not pr' 

11 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTEXTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

7'2. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 17th .July, 1905, for copies of all correspondence, 

document-, orders, and all papers whatsoever, relating to the proposed deviation of the line of the 

James Bay Railway to the west of Lake Simcoe : also for copies of the original route, map and 

location of line, as tiled in the railway department ; and correspondence and papers concerning the 

nted 4t li April, 1906. — Mr. Grant Not printed . 

73. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April. lOu'S, for copies of the correspond- 

ence passed between the Imperial government upon the subject of the petition sent of a party of 
British printers, complaining that they were brought to this country under misrepresentation as to 
exising labour conditions in Canada, and for all papers on the subject. Presented 5th April, 1906. — 
Mr. I- '• Not printed. 

74. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 21st March. 1906, for a copy of the last financial 

tement and balance sheet of the Quebec Bridge and Railway Company. 2. Alist of thedireclors 
of the company and of its chief officers, and of its shareholders and the amount of shares held by 
each. 3. A statement of the bonds of the company which have been guaranteed by the government, 
and which hare been negotiated or are pledged. 4. A statement of all moneys paid by the govern- 
ment '»n aco mnt of capital or interest on the said bonds. Presented 5th April. 1906.— Mr. Monk. 

Not printed. 

7.">. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 17th July, 1905, for copies of all correspondence, 
documents, resolutions, and other papers relating to any efforts or proposals to authorize the invest- 
ment of trust funds in the United Kingdom in the securities of any province of Canada, and the 
fulfilment of any necessary conditions to that end. Presented 5th April, l'.Hiti. — ,1/r. Borden 

'■• Not printed. 

76. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 21st March, 1906: 1. Showing the present in 

iminion government of the Montreal Turnpike Trust, (a) on capital account (6) 
for arrears of interest. 2. The amounts collected at each toll _ •■ belonging to the said Turnpike 
Trust, during the ye I list December, 1905. 3. The amount expended on each section or 

road division under the control of said Trust, during the said year, ending 31st December, 1!K>5, and 
the contracts given out during the year, with the name of the contractor, the date and amount in- 
volved in each case. ■ supplied, and in each case an indie i nether tenders 
for such contracts were called for in the public press. 4. Th> said year 

eh t'.ll gate for salaries I., day and night keeper, and all I Dl nditure at each of the toll 
gates maintained. 5. The actual indebtedness in detail of the said Trust outside of its bonds due to 
the government of Canada. 6. A detailed statement of sums paid out during the year outside of 
salaries, road maintenance and rent. Presented oth April. 1906. — Mr. Monk Not Printed. 

77. i; ,ni to an Order of ill II unions, dated 19th March, 1906, for copies of all con espondenoe 

immendatioi 18, in possession of the Government, or any department or offi- 
cial thereof, with reference to the dismissal of Mi. Joseph Mc' rat Iona, in Prince 
Edward [-land, and the appointment of his successor. Presented nth April, 1906. -Mr. Martin 
{Queen's) Not printed, 

71a. Return to an order of the Souse of Commons, dated 17th July, 1906, for copies of all correspondence, 
doi ■'■ -nd all papers whatsoever, relating to the dismissal of dames Power, late post- 
master at W'heatlev River, Prince Edward Island, and for the appointment of a successor ; also all 
correspondence and petitions relating to the reappointment of the said dames Power. Presented 
i April, 1906, '/ Ml '») Not printed. 

'''■ Return to an ordei ..f tin Hi moos, dated 5th April, 1906, for a oopj of all petitions, let- 

.. correspondence, reports, memoranda, and any other documemta respecting the dismissal of 

Mr. Patrick Walsh from the postmastership of East Roman Valley, in the county of Guysborough, 

Nova Scotia. Presented lsl May, 1906 ■ !er Wat Printed. 

: ' Return to an order of the House iifi' mms, dated 25th April. 1906, for a copy of all correspondence 

i orders in i the government, or any member or official thereof, respecting the dis- 

Mrs. Sarah Smith from llie office of postmistress at Mount Ruchanan, l'rnue Edward 
ad, and tin appointment of Mr. l'.ishop in her stead. Presented 7th May. 1906. Mr. McLean 

Not printed. 

12 



5 Edw. VI I. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

7 7(7. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th May, 1906, for a copy of all correspondence, 
telegiams and petitions, in possession of the government, or any member or official thereof, in refer- 
ence to the dismissal of David D. Coffin as postmaster at Head of Hillsboro' in Prince Edward 
Island, and the appointment of his successor. Presented 4th June, 1906. — Mr. Martin (Queen's) 

Not printed. 

78. Return to an order of the House of Commons dated 28th March, 1906, for a copy of the report of the 

deputy postmaster general, that an additional first class ell rkship is necessary for the proper per- 
formance of the public business in the department, for which clerkship parliament is asked to vote 
money ; also for a copy of the report of the deputy postmaster general, that an additional second- 
class clerkship is necessary for the proper performance of the public business in the department, for 
which clerkship parliament is asked to vote money. Presented 5th April, 1906.— Ifr. Barker. 

Wot printed. 

79. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 19th March, 1906, for copies of all petitions, let- 

ters and correspondence relating to the change of the location of the post office at French Village, 
Prince Edward Island. Presented 5th April. 1906. — Mr. McLean [Q Not pn 

80. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April, 1906, for copies of all correspond- 

ence with the government by any parties in Lethbridge, concerning any matters in connection with 
the Lethbridge coal miners' strike, and the calling out of the mounted police in connection with the 
same. Presented 6th April, 1906. — Mr. Smith ( Nanaimo) Not printed. 

81. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 11th March, 1906, showing the names of all the 

homestead inspectors at present attached to the thirteen agencies throughout Manitoba and the 
Northwest, and a record showing the number of days that each inspector was absent from his regu- 
lar duties, between the 1st of July and the 31st December, 1905, the cause of said absence, and a 
statement of expenses for each month during that period. Presented 5th April, 1906. — Mr. Mc- 
Carthy ' < 'alga-ry) Not printed. 

82. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April, 1906, for a copy of the order in coun- 

cil appointing Mr. \V. A. Weeks to investigate certain matters in dispute respecting lands taken by 
the Prince Edward Island Railway, and certain other matters in dispute connected with that rail- 
way ; also a copy of the evidence and report of the said W. A. Weeks in the matter. Presented 6th 
April, 1906.-- Mr. Martin (Queen's) -V 

83. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March. 1906, for copies of all oorrespo 

ence had between the government or any department or member thereof, and the Transcontinental 
Construction Commission, in reference to the surveys of location of the route of the Transcontinental 
Railway, in the province of New Brunswick. Presented 6th April, 1906.— Mr. Crocket. .Notprinted. 

88a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 18th April, 1906, fur copies of all correspi 

ence had between the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company and the government or any di part- 
ment thereof, and between the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company and the Transcontinental 
Railway Commission, in reference to the survey and location of the proposed Transcontinental Rail 
way between Quebec and Moncton. Presented 1st June, 1906. Mr Crocket Nut printed. 

84. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, for copies of all forms of appli- 

cation for homestead entries used since the year 1890. Presented 6th April, 1906. —Mr. Ingram. 

Not print: d. 

85. Statement showing the wharfs transferred to the department of marine and fisheries since 1896. 

Presented 6th April, 1906, by Hon. L. P. Brodeur Not printi d. 

86. Return to an order oi the House of Commons, dated 19th March. 1906, (a) Betting forth the various 

laws in the- United Kingdom, ami in the various dependencies and colonies of the Empire, with 
respect to the naturalization of aliens ; (6) defining the effect of naturalization consummated in I 
Britain, or in the various colonies or dependencies, respectively, when a person so Dal iralized be- 
comes domiciled thereafter, in any othei portion of the Empire : (c) Betting forth any efforts hi 
fore made by the government of the United Kingdom, or of any colony or dependency, or by any 
body or association, for the purpose of securing uniformity in the naturalization laws throughout 
the Empire. Presented 6th A pril, 1906. — Mr. Borden < 

" // oort nal /'"; i r« 

13 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1 906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

87. Copy of a letter addressed to S. G. Curry, Esquire, architect, informing him that, under an order in 
council, a commission will be to-day issued to him jointly with Mr. A. C. Hutchison, architect, of 
Montreal, to hold an investigation and to report upon an accident which occurred on the morning of 
the 5th instant, by the collapse of part of the tower in the west block extension of the departmental 
buildings in this city. Plans and specifications of the said extension accompany the said letter. 
Presented Hth April, 1906, by Hon. C. S. Hyman Not printed 

8S. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th March, 1905, for copies of all reports, re- 
turns, estimates, correspondence, writings, records, documents, memoranda, or written or printed 
information of any kind in the | lossession or control of the post office department, in reference to the 
question of establishing rural mail delivery in Canada, or the manner of establishing or conducting 
such service, and the probable cost ; including any information in the possession of the department 
as to the working of the United States system, or such a service or system elsewhere and the annual 
expense and other particulars. Presented 9th April, 1906. — Mr. Lennox. 

Printed for Sessional Papers. 

89. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April, 1906, for a copy of all correspondence, 

letters, telegrams, memorials or other documents, between the post office department, or any official 
thereof, and any person or persons, respecting the removal of the post office in the town of Thorn 
dale, Ontario, from the place of business of Mr. S. Duffins, to the place of business of Mr. J. Fal- 
coner. Presented 9th April, 1906. — Mr. Elson - Not printed. 

90. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 19th March, 1906, showing all timber lands sold or 

leased by the department of the interior subsequent to the date of those included in Sessional Paper 
No. 39, brought down to the house on the 12th March, 1906 ; the description and area of such lots, 
the applications made therefor, the notice of advertisement for sale or tender, the tenders received, 
the amount of each tender, the tenders accepted, the name and address of the person or company to 
whom each lot was sold or leased. Presented 9th April, 1906. — Mr. Foster Not printed. 

ft 1 . Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated Hth March, 1906, showing : 1. The number of 
homesteaders to make entry in and for the territory now included in the provinces of Manitoba. 
Saskatchewan and Alberta, during each year between 1896 and 31st December, 1905. '.'. The 
nationality of said homesteaders, dividing same into the following categories: (a) British North 
America | ' Britain and Inland : (c) the United States ; (d) France, Belgium and Swil 
land; (e) Germany, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Iceland ; (/) all other countries of 
continental Europe; [g) all other nationalities ; («) persons who previously made entry. Presented 
9th April. 1906. — Mr. Wilton [Lennox ami Addington) Not print' d. 

91a." Return to an order of the Sou f Commons, dated 14th March, 1900. showing : 1. The number of 

authorizations granted, under the authority of subsection 3 of article 34 of the Dominion Lands Act. 
for one person to make homestead entry on behalf of another person, during each of the yen 
1901, 1902, 1903, 1904 and 1905. -'. Of the homestead entries made in consequence of said authori- 
zations, during each of the years 1901 and 1902 ; how many have resulted in a demand for a patent : 
how many have been cancelled ; how many stood upon the bunks of the department of the im 
on 1st January, 1906, as neither patented nor cancelled. 3. How many of the lion itered 

for during 1901 and 1902 on behalf of absent parties by means of powers of attorney, have been 
patented in the name of the person for whom the original entry was made. Presented 11th April. 
190G. Mr. Lake Not printed. 

Bib. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 1 1th March. 1906, showing, in respect of ever] 
case where, during the year ending 30th .Tune. 1905, and during the six months ending Slsl Decem- 
ber, 1905, an extension of time within which to complete hi< entry, has been accorded any home- 
ttder within the territory now included in the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta i 
giving: (a) the name of the applicant for said extension j (I) his post office address at the time 
of original entry; (o) the date and agency of original homestead entry ; [d] (lie location Of the 
land in question, indicating township, range and section ; wi the earliest date at which applicant 
might have become entitled to secure a patent, had all conditions been promptly fulfilled ; [f\ post 
office addie^ of applicant at time of demand for extension ; [g) the date of demand for extension : 
(a) the length of extension granted ; (i) the cause of granting extension ; (/) the nam. or names 
of any and all parties who may have communicated with the department for the purpose of recom- 
mending the granting of said extension j (t) the nan f the homestead inspector who reported on 

It 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

the case, and whether he advised in favour of granting an extension or the contrary : [I) the name 
and address of any and every person who shall have applied to record a cancellation against said 
section or part thereof. All the aliove informationto be arranged according to agencies. Presen ted 
11th April, 1906.— Mr. Ames Not printed. 

91c. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 11106. showing : (a) the number 
of land sales, withdrawing even sections from homestead entry, made by the department of the in- 
terior during the year 1904 5, and during the six months ending 31st December. 1905, together with 
the total acreage represented thereby ; (b) the same regarding land sales affecting only odd 
tions ; (c) the same regarding land sales affecting solid blocks of both even and odd sections. Pre- 
sented 23rd April, 1906.— Mr. McCarthy (Calgary) Not printed. 

91d. Return to an order of the House of Common., dated 14th March, 1906, showing : 1. The number 
of homestead entries recorded each fiscal year from 1870 to 1905, and also during the six months end- 
ing 31st December, 1905. for the territory comprised in the present provinces of Manitoba, Saskatche- 
wan and Alberta. 2. The number and percentage of such entries for each year for which patents 
have prior to the 31st December, 1905, been granted, or recommendations made for the issue of 
patents. 3. The number and ]>ercentage of such entries for each year that have, prior to the 31st 
December, 1905, been cancelled. 4. The number and percentage of such entries for each year which, 
neither patented or cancelled, remained in an incompleted state on the first of January, 1906. Pre- 
sented 8th June, 1906. —Mr. Lake Not pr. 

92. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing the name and post 

office address of each person or company having a closed grazing lease, granted for a period of more 
than three years, by the department of the interior, of lands in Alberta or Saskatchewan, giving in 
each instance, (a) the location boundaries and area of each tract of land so leased ; (6) the date of 
issue and of expiry of said lease; (o) the annual rental specified therein ; hi) and the amount of 
overdue rental wherever such be the case. Presented 9th April, 1906. — Mr Ames Not printed. 

93. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1906, for copies of all correspon- 

dence, telegrams, memoranda, reports and orders in council, in possession of the government, or any 
inember or official thereof, in connection with the grant of an additional subsidy to the province of 
Prince Edward Island in 1901, of -530,000 a year, and the basis ou which the said subsidy was agreed 
to be paid to the province. Presented 10th April, 1906. — Mr. Marti ... .Not printed. 

94. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April, 1906. for copies of all correspondence 
and contracts, if any. list of payments to men employed by the department of marine and fisheries 
in construction of LakeOcebe lighthouse, on the Maganetawan River, district of Parry Sound. Pre- 
sented 10th April, 1906.— Mr. Bennett Not printed. 

95. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 17th April, 1906, for copies of orders in 
council and correspondence having reference t> the assumption by the department of railways and 
canals of tlit- several dams owned by the Ontario government on the head and subsidiary waters of 
the Trent canal. Presented 17th April, 1906. — Bon. If. It. Emmerson Not pi 

95a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th .April. 1906, showing the progress made 
and sums expended from time to time upon the construction of the Trent canal, giving the dat 
the various contracts let, the completion of said contracts, the names of contractors on said contr 
the amount paid in extras, and the causes of these extras. Presented 26th April. 1906. .1/7. ]] 
(Victoria) Not pr 

96. Return to an address of thp House of Commons, dated 14th March. 1906, for copies of all correal 
dence between the provincial governments on the subject of the readjustment of provincial subsidies. 
Presented 17th April, 1906. — Mr. Parmdee Printed/or both distribution and sessional p" : 

97. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, for copies of all petitions, re- 
ports, letters, notices, telegrams, correspondence, recommendation-, bonds, li ases, papers and docu- 
ments in relation to a site and new ]x)st office building in the county of Elgin, at Ayliner. Presen 
ted 17th April, lyOO. — Mr. Ingram Not printed. 

98. Return to an order of the House ot Commons, dated 28th March. 1906, showing all amounts paid for 
dredging in the province of Ontario, from the 1st July, 1905, up to the present time ; the place 
where such work was performed ; the names of parties doing such work, and the amount paid there- 
for ; also of any unpaid amounts due or alleged to be due for dp iwing the amount, the 
parties claiming, and where the work was don.-. Presented 17th April, 1906. —Mr. Bennett. 

Not / 

15 



5 Erlw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTEXTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

99. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 17th April, 1906, for copy of a circular letter, 
dated the 19th March. 1906, addressed to the judges of the various courts throughout the Dominion 
by the deputy minister of justice, embodying the question propounded in the house of commons on 
on the 14th March, 1906. regarding the manner in which the provisions of section 7 of 4 and 5 Ed- 
ward VII, cap. 31, are being observed, and the answer given thereto on behalf of the government 
by the minister of justice. Presented 17th April, 1906. — Hon. C. Fitzpatrick Not printed. 

99'i. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1906, showing, (a) the number of judges 
whose salaries are paid out of the consolidated revenue of Canada; (b) the name and residence of 
each judge: If) the amount of salary and expenses paid to each judge; (rf) the area of the judicial 
district in which such judge exercises jurisdiction, and in the case of local, district, and county judges. 
the population of the district ; (c) the number of eases tried by each judge in each year since the 1st 
January, 1901 ; (J) the number of motions, petitions, &c, disposed of by each judge during each 
year, at chambers or in a summary manner: Iff) the number of days during which eacli judge was 
actually engaged in tie- performance of judicial dutiss : [h] the number of days during which each 
judge was engaged in any occupation, business or matter other than the performance of his judicial 
duties. Presented 17th April, 1906. — Mr. Letnox Not printed. 

100. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April. 1906, for a copy of the report made 
by the deputy minister of labour, on the result of his investigation into the complaints of the AVin- 
ni|ieg printers, and any papers, showing what action, if any. lias been taken by the government on 
his report. Presented 17th April, 1906. — Mr. Fervilte Not printed. 

101. Return to an order of the House of Commcr 8th March, 1906, showing what land sales 
have been made in blocks or area of more than one-half section, during the years 1903, 1904 and 1905, in 
Manitoba, the Territories, including the new provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, and British 
Columbia : to whom the same were sold in each instance : the price per acre, and the date of sale in 
eacli instance. Presented 17th April, 1906. — Mr. Sproule Not printed 

102. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 13th March, 1905 : 1. For copies of all adver 
ononis, tenders, contracts, plans, specifications and papers, relating to the construction of the 

is if the Murray Harbour Branch Railway. 2. Of the several articles of rolling stock 
referred I 2186 of Hansard of 28th April, L904, supplied on capital account to the afore: 
railway in each of the years there mentioned : with the prices at which each article was charged to 
capital. 3. The names of the companies, persons or railways from which each such article was 
acquired, and the price therefor j stating if the article was new or second-hand. 4. The ue 
which each such article was applied when acquired, what compensation was received for such use, 
from whom, and how the proceeds were applied. 5. Where each such article of rolling stock is now, 
inv, iid on what terms. Presented 17th April, 1906. — Mr. Barker Not printed. 

103. Report of an inquiry into certain matters conni cte 1 wi h the construction of the Ottawa post orhee. 
Pn sented 18th April, 1906, by Hon. C. S. Hyman Not printed. 

HI I. Return to an order of the House of I '.minions, dated 21-: March, 1906, for copies of the contract, to- 
gether with plan- and specifications, between the government and tin' Dominion Coal Company, 
for the improvement of Glace Bay Harbour for public purposes ; also copies of all correspondence, 
telegrams, memoranda, and representations in;" 1 [rates, members of parliament, or any 
er persons, having thereto; also copies of all accounts famished to the government for 
expenditu M. th< Dominion Coal Company. Presented 19th April, 1906. 
Mr Mni in (Queens) Not printed. 

105. Return to an addrec 1 15th March, 1906, of the number and amount of policies 

transferred from assessment section to legal re-, i > ader Act of 1904, by the Mutual Reserve 

Life Insurance (' pany of New York; also the number and amount of policies written by the 

c pany during L905 and the cash payments made thereon. Presented 19th April. 1006. — 

// '/ MM.. Not printed. 

lot,, r il >f Commons, dated 19th March, 1906, for copies of all oi 

council, i i»ris, options, agreements for the purchase or has.-. Lei dob, corre- 
spondence and othei rj nature ami descripti relating to the acquisition of land 

for the purpo iry training at lYtawawa. in the province of Ontario, together with the 

uai , .-■',. firms and corporations from whom any such lands 

1(5 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

were purchased, leased or otherwise acquired ; the dates when such property was purchased, leased 
or otherwise acquired. Also a return showing the extent of the lands purchased, leased or other- 
wise acquired from' each person, firm or corporation, the consideration therefor, the amount of the 
purchase or rental, and all amounts payable in respect thereof, including any commission upon said 
purchase, rental or acquisition. Also the names of all persons civil or military, who acted for the 
government in connection with such purchasing, leasing or other acquisition. Also all letters, tele- 
grams, papers, correspondence and other documents between the vendor or lessee, or any persons 
acting for them and the government, or any person acting for the government, including all 
protests of persons owning or claiming to own land in the vicinity ; and all correspondence 
between such persons and the government, and all correspondence between any person acting for 
the government, and any person or persons claiming to be interested in any such purchase, sale 
or acquisition. Also the names of all persons engaged in making the final or other settlementof any 
claims for the purchasing, leasing or other acquisition of any such lands, or for trespass upon or 
interference with any adjoining lands, or the persons residing thereon, and a full statement of all the 
amounts, if any, paid to each such person engaged in making any such settlement, or in making any 
arrangement in connection with such claims. Also a statement of the amount and nature of all 
claims for trespass or interference, and of all sums paid or payable in respect thereof. Presented 
23rd April, 1900.— Mr. Worthington Not printed. 

107. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1900, showing the number of mail 
contracts in Peel county, giving location, number of miles, names of couriers, and price paid. Also 
date of commencement, date of expiration, and names of bondsmen ; also if public tenders were 
asked ; the name of each preceding contract, with name of courier, and the price paid. Presented 
23rd April. 1900.— Mr. Blain Not printed. 

108. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April, 1900, for copies of all reports and 
communications from the superintendent of insurance to the government, or to the minister of fin- 
ance, during the years 1903, 1904 and 1905, relating or referring to the desirability or expediency of 
any further amendment or amendments to the Insurance Act, or relating or referring to any defects 
in said act. Presented 23rd April, 1900.— Mr. Borden ( Carlcton) Not printed. 

108« Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, for a copy of the special 
report of the superintendent of insurance addressed to the minister of finance, bearing daM 9th 
November, 1905 : also copies of all other reports, correspondence and documents, from 1st January, 
1905, up to the date of the return, respecting the regulation of life insurance in Canada. Presented 
23rd April, 1900. — Mr. Borden (Carlcton) Not printed. 

108'j. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, for copies of all telegrams, 
reports, communications, investigations, letters and documents of every description, relating to the 
necessity of investigating the working of insurance companies doing business in the Dominion of 
Canada, including all correspondence, communications and other documents, whether advocating or 
opposing, or otherwise relating to the commission recently appointed for the above purpose : or any 
investigation either by the government or by a commission, committee of the house, or otherwise, 
into the matters aforesaid ; also in connection with the recommendation and appointment of the 
commissi. .ners. Presented 23rd April, 1906.— Mr. Ingram Not printed. 

109. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th March, 19115, for copies of all correspondence, 
documents, papers, and reports, not already brought down relating to the harbour at Port Colborne, 
the breakwater thereof, and elevators, or p»uposed elevators therein. Presented 23rd April, 1906.— 
Mr. Barker Not printed. 

1 10. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 21st March, 1906, for copies of all thermograph 
records of temperatures on ocean steamers in the possession of the government, taken during the 
season of 1905, stating : (1) where the thermograph was placed in each case, whether in cold storage 
chambers, cool air chambers, ventilated chambers, unventilated chambers, or on deck or other part 
of the vessel, exposed only to the natural ocean temperature, and in this latter instance, if liable to 
be exposed to the sun's rays; (2) the kind of produce that was stored in the chamber if any ; (3) date 

01 sailing of steamer, the port from which sailing, name of vessel and line of steamers ; (4) where the 
chamber was a ventilated chamber, state method of ventilation, size and number of intakes, also of 
outflows for air. Presented 23rd April, 1906. — Mr. Smith (Wentxcorth) Not printed. 

2 IT 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME U— Continued, 

111. Pit-turn to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1906, fur copies of all reports made 
subsequent to 3rd April, 1905, in respect of Joseph Nixon, land agent at Macleod. Presented '.'3rd 
April, 1906.— Mr. Foster Not printed* 

1 1 2. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March. 1906, showing the total number of 
land patents issued, together with the acreage covered thereby, in and for the territory included 
within the limits of the present provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, between the year 
ls72 and the 31st December, 1905, under each of the following forms of grant, stating also whether 
odd or even sections were affected : commutation grants, homesteads, Manitoba Act grants, military 
bounty grants. Northwest half-breed giants, parish sales, quit claim special grants, railways, sales of 
mining, farming, ranching, &c, school land sales, special grants, and all others. Presented 23rd 
April, 1906. — Mr. Ames Not pr 

1 12a. Return to an order of the-House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing the parcels of land, 
other than railway grants, which since 1896, have been sold, in the present province of Alberta or 
Saskatchewan, for irrigation projects : giving in each instance area, location and price obtained, and 
the name of the company or individual to whom sale was made. Presented 23rd April, 1906. — Mr 

Ames Not pit 

1 1 86. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 14th March. 1906, for copies of all contracts 
ind agreements between the government, or any department of the government, and the Qu'Appelle, 
Long Lake and Saskatchewan Railroad and Steamboat Company, and all orders in council, reports, 
papers, documents and correspondence respecting: (a) any loan to the said company ; (6) any indebt- 
edness of the said company to the crown or to the government ; (c) any lands to which the company 
might become entitled by virture of any statute, contract or agreement : (<£) any land granted to or 
earned by the company ; (/ ) the area within which such iands might be selected by the company ; i /I 
any enlargement, change or alteration of the area within which such lands might be selected by the 
company, or by any purchaser from the assignee oi the company. 2. All correspondence respecting 
the matters above mentioned between the government, or any department of the government, or any 
official or person acting or purporting to act for the government and the -aid company, or any official 
thereof, or any person acting or purporting to act therefor, or any assignee of or pur haser from the 
d company. 3. All orders in council relating to. touching ning the said company's land 
grant, or the area within which tin- same might be selected, or any enlarg alteration of that 
;i. 4. All correspondence between the government, or any department or official thereof, and the 
Saskatchewan Valley Land Company, or any offi arson purport! at company, 

or any person or persons, tine or&ms, syndicate or synd m whom the Saskatchewan Valley 
Land Company acquired any port ion of the land grant of the Qu'Appelle, Long Lake and Saskatche- 
wan Railroad and Steamboat Company. 5. Ali & etween any shareholders or persons 
interested in th- Qu'Appelle, Long Lake and Saskatchewan Railroad and Steamboat Company, with 
mment or any department or official I i all claims and demands made by that 
company, or by any person interested therein against the government, in respect of the sail land 
grant, or the selection thereof , or any of the matters ab tfay, 1906. 

Mr. /lord ... .| Not printed. 

1 12c. eturn to No. 1126. Presented 11th May, 1906 Not printed. 

l i:f. Ri i i.i ii to an older of the House of Commons, elated 28th March, L906, showing tb iginal tenders 

received bj the department of the interior in connection with the leasing of timber berths No-. L158, 
1 175, 1192, 121H. 1231, and 1232, during tin- years 1904 and 1905, with copies of all correspondence in 
reference thereto, had with the minister of the inti nor. the department itself, or any officer thereof : 
and the various transfers, if any, made of Me leases aftei ! [ranted to the successful ten- 

derers, giving name of transferee and date of transfer, Presented 33rd April. L906. — 

Mr F.tx/t r JVo( /.;■ 

111. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April, 1906, showing the number of per- 
manent employees at present in the serviceof the lion - ms, the names and duties of each ; 
the salary and length of service in each case ; the number of sessional employees at present in the 
ice of the House of Commons, flu 1 daily pay of each, and the names and duties of each j the 
number of em] both classes who wereemployed in the session of 1896. Presented 24th 

\pnl. 1906. Mr. sprmdc Not printed. 

is 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTEXTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

114a. Return giving the information asked for by the House of Commons in their message, dated 30th 
April, 1906, requesting their honours to furnish to the Commons a return showing the number of 
permanent employees at present in the service of the Senate, the names and duties of each, and the 
salary and length of service in each case : the number of sessional employees at present in th« 
vice of the Senate, the daily pay of each, and the names and duties of each ; the number of em- 
ployees of both classes who were employed in the session of 1896. Presented 11th May. 1906.- Mr 
Sproulc Not printed . 

1146. Return to an order of the Senate, dated 8th instant, showing payments made to permanent and 
Bes ^ional employees during the fiscal year 1895-6, and 191)4-5. Presented 14th May. 1906. — Bon 
tiir Marten /.'■■ <eU Not pr 

115. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1906, for copies of all correspond- 
ence between the Collingwood Dry Dock Company and any department m reference to bounty payable 
to said company ; also a copy of the valuation of said dock, if any, made on behalf of the depart- 
ment of public works. Presented 24th April, 1906. — Mr. Bennett Not printed. 

116. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April, 1906, showing : (a) what quantities 
of fish of different classifications, naming them, were entered for export at the ports of Port Arthur, 
Fort William, Sault Ste. Marie, Manitoulin Island and all Georgian Bay ports, respectively, during 
the fiscal years ending 30th June, 1890, 1891. 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1sh6, 1S97, 1898, 1899, 1900, 
1901, 1902, 1933, 1904, 1905; (b) the value of such consignments so entered; (c) the amount of 
duty paid thereon ; (el) the county or counties to which the said consignments were exported. Pre- 
sented 24th April, 1906. — Mr. Boyce y.-,t printed. 

117. A copy of a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation between Great Britain and Japan. Presented 
24th AprU, 1900. by Sir Wilfrid Laurier Printed for sessional papers . 

118. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1906, for copies of all contra 

for supplies of food for the permanent military fores and mounted police of the Dominion ; also 
for all the supplies of food to the volunteers at their annual drill camps last summer; also for the 
supplies to the military schools of the Dominion. Presented 20th April, 1906. — Mr. Smith H 

>'»-> Not printed . 

1 18«. Supplementary return to No. lis. Presented 1st May. 1906 Not printed . 

119. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April, 1906, for copies of all reports, letters. 
communications, surveys, papers and documents respecting any defects in the Peterborough lift -lock, 
or any difficulties in the operation of the said lock, or any defects in the Trent Valley canal in the 
vicinity of or in connection with the Peterborough lift lock. Presented 26th April. 1900.— Mr. 
Barkir Not printed. 

1 19«. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th May. 1906, foi copies of all correspondence, 
inquiries, reports, or other data bearing upon the Trent canal in connection with the lift lock at 
Peterborough and the works at Kirkfield : together with all correspondence with engineers, soli 
and contractors, in connection with the same. Presented 13th June, 1906. — Mr. II 

■ ■ > A 

120. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 25th April, 1906, for a copy of all contracts 
with steamship companies for steamboat service between Canada and Mexico. Presented 27th April. 
1906. — Mr. McLean (Queen's i Printed for both distribution and 

121. Extract from a Report of the Committee of the Privy Council approved by the Governor General on 
the 21st April. 1891, on a report from the minister of the interior in relation to the case of ' The 
Temperance Colonization Society (Limited).' Presented 27th April, 19i»i. by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Not printed. 

121a. Certified copy of a Report of a Committee of the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by II - 
Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the 21st April, 1901, respecting "The Temp, i 
Colonization Society, Limited," and defining in general terms the mode of dealing with colonization 
companies desiring to have their agreements cancelled and their accounts with the government 
closed. Presented 29th May, 1906, by Hon. F. < (liver JVof printed 

H 19 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME U— Continued. 

132. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April, 1900, for copies of all orders in 
council, or other authority, for the survey of a branch line of railway from the main line of the 
Prince Edward Island Railway to Stanley Bridge ; also for copies of all engineers' reports, 
memoranda, tec, correspondence, telegrams, or other documents in relation thereto ; including the 
claims of Austin J. Macneill and others for damages to property in connection with the said survey. 
Presented 30th April, 1906.— Mr Martin (Queen's) Not printed. 

123. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1906, for copies of all letters, 
telegrams, communications and correspondence received since the first day of January, 1905, from 
any government, corporation, firm, or person, respecting the quality of fruit exported from Canada 
and relating to the inspection of such fruit ; and copies of all letters and communications from any 
department of the government in reply thereto. Presented 30th Apiil. 1906.— ilfr. Smith i Went- 
north ) Not printed. 

123«. Partial Return (in so far as the Department of Trade and Commerce is concerned) to an address of 
the Senate, dated '_'4tli April, 1906, for a statement showing : 1st. The number of barrels and boxes 
of apples (stated separately) exported from Canada to foreign countries, including those shipped 
through I ttesports; 2nd. The number of packages of Canadian apples (stated as aforesaid) 
delivered at the following European ports : London, Liverpool, Glasgow, Manchester, Bristol, 
Belfast, Hamburg, Havre and Antwerp. The number of barrels and boxes (stated separately) and 
to lie given separately, for each of the aforesaid ports ; 3rd. The number of packages as aforesaid, 
iring the marks required by the Fruit Marks Act, stating separately the number of packages 
bearing each of the different marks authorized by the said act ; 4th. The number of packages as 
aforesaid, which were found by the inspectors appointed by the department of agriculture or the 
commercial agents of the department of trade and commerce, to be dishonestly packed or falsely 
marked ; 5th. The names of all inspectors appointed by the government, or the department of 
.agriculture operating either in Canada or elsewhere, under the provisions of the Fruit Marks Act. 
and the salary and other allowances paid to each, and the territory covered by each inspector : 6th. 
The names of all the commercial agents employed by the government or the department of trade 
and commerce and operating in the United Kingdom, tbe British Colonies and foreign countries 
and the salary and other allowances paid to each, and the territory covered by each agent. Present- 
ed 9th May, 1906.— Hon. Mr. Ferguson Not printed. 

123'/. Supplementary return to No. 123a. Presented 9th May, 1906 Not p 

1 24. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated nth April, 1906, for a copy of all contracts 
veen the Ross Rifle Company and the government, or the department of militia, for the supply 
of ritles, ammunition, or other articles, and all orders in council, correspondence, reports, docu- 
ments and papers relating to such contracts or to the subject-matter thereof, or to the operations i if 
tie i Mm i .any, or to its dealing with the government, or any of the departments thereof, including 
t>i. department of customs. Presented 1st May, 1906. — Mr. Worthinaton Not print"/. 

125. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April, 1906, for a copy of tile report of 

A. E. DuBerger, on the drug and proprietary medicine trade of Canada. Presented 1st May. 1906. 

.1//-. J'trrmelee Printed for i><-tii distribution and a sstonaj papers. 

1 Hi. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April, 1906, fjr a copy of the report made 
by the deputy minister of labour on the results of his investigation into the importation of Italian 
labourers into the city of Montreal in the spring of 1904. Presented 1st May. 1900.— Mr. Verrille. 

Not printed. 

1ST. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th March, 1900, for copies of all corres- 
pondence, plans, specifications, surveys, &c, pertaining to relief from the river Thames, say between 
the rity of London and Lake St. Clair for the overflow of water from the said river, pertaining to 
canal or cut off to Lake Erie or other points. Presented 1st May, 1900.— Mr.C/ements .Nut printed. 

liH, Return to an order of the House of Commons, da'cd ISth April, 1906, tor a copy of the specifications 

for the Victoria Memorial Museum, especially that [Hirtion thereof showing the kind, quality and 

dimensions of st to lie used by the contractor in the exterior walls of the same ; also for a cop\ i i 

all correspondence regarding stone for the said building bet w.en the government, or any department, 

20 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 190G 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

minister or official, and every person or corporation, including the contractor, Mr. Goodwin, an'l the 
owners or lessees of the Read. Battery, River Phillip, and other quarries. Presented 1st May, 11)06. 
—Mr. Perlcy Not printed. 

139. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1906, for a copy of all correspondence 
and reports relative to the sale of the Giant's Tomb Island, or timber thereon, or to any negotiations 
with any person or persons for the purchase of said Island or timber thereon, or both. Presented 
3rd May, 1906.— Mr. Bennett Not printed. 

130. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 11th April, 1906, for a copy of a certain report 
or communication to the department of the interior, from C. W. Speers. an officer of that depart- 
ment, dated in or about the month of February. 1901, recommending that 10,000 acres of land, 
included in or situate near the land afterwards sold by the government to Colonel A. I>. Davidson 
and his associates should be broken at the expense of the government, to establish the fact that grain 
could be produced in that district ; also for a copy of the map submitted therewith ; also for a copy 
of all reports, letters and communications to the said department, up to the 24th day of May, 1902. 
respecting the quality or value of the said lands, mentioned in the order in council of that'! 1 ' 
Presented 3rd May, 1906.— Mr. Barker Not pr 

130«. Supplementary return to No. 130. Presented 11th May, 190B Not printed. 

131. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March. 1906, showing the amount of 
money scrip redeemed in Dominion lands, and the number of acres thus purchased from the govern- 
ment, (a) in Manitoba; (6) in the Northwest, the figures for each year from 1N7.5 to 31st December. 
1905, being given separately. Presented 3rd May. 1906. Mr. Roche (Marquette) Not printed. 

132. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 21st March 1906, of all the valuations made in 
or previously to the year 1902. of the lands sold or granted in that year to the Saskatchewan 
Valley Land Company. Presented 3rd May, 1906.— .Mr. Borden (Carleton) Not printed. 

133. Return to an order of the House of Commons, elated 14th March, 1906. showing : 1. The number of 
allotments of 240 acres of land, and acreage covered by the same, made between the 1st of July, 
ls'.ifi, and the 31st of December, 1905, to the half-breeds of Manitoba, giving separately the figures 
for each year, and for the final six months. 2. The land scrip, if any, issued during the aforesaid 
period to colonization companies, giving in the case of each such company the name and head office 
address, and also giving the face value of such scrip and the year of its issuance. 3. The number 
and acreage of land scrip issued during the same period, to the half-breeds of the Northwest (now 
Alberta and Saskatchewan), giving separately the figures for each year and for the final six months. 
4. The numher of acres of land scrip located within the limit of each of the thirteen Dominion land 
agencies of Manitoba and the Northwest, between the 1st of July, 1896, and the 31st of December, 
L905, the figures of each agency each year to be given separately. 5. The number of, acreage of land 
scrip granted prior to 1st July. 1896, to the half-breeds (a) in Manitoba and (6) of the Northwest. 6. 
The amount outstanding, granted but not located, on 1st July, 1890. Presented 3rd May, 1906. — 
Mr. Roche (Ma Not p> 

134. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing: (1) The total 
number of acres of land within the present limits of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, voted by 
parliament to railway -.2. The area of said lands in respect of which the time by law 
specified for earning the same has elapsed. 3. The area of said lands («) which has been earned, 
selected and patented ; (b) which lias been earned and selected, but not patented; (c) which has 
been earned but neither selected nor patented. 4. The area of land which may yet be earned by 
any railway company, indicating the name of the company, and the amount of subsidy possible. 6. 
In the case of each of the following roads, the Canadian Northern Railway Company, the Manitoba 
and Southeastern Railway Company, and the Qu'Appelle, Long Lake and Saskatchewan Railway 
Company, (a) the quantity of land which may yet be earned | mtity earned but not 
patented; (c) the extent, location (giving township and range), and boundaries of thi 
territory wherein each of the remaining selections may be made. 6. The several orders in council by 
virtue of which the area of selection affecting the companies mentioned in paragraph 5 were indii 

and any amendments of the same. The whole of the aba 

January, 1906. Presented 3rd May. 1900. Mr. A ;.k.< S 

135. R turn to an order of the Bouse of Commons, dated 11th April. 19o0, for a copy of any and all 
proposals or requests made byoron behalf of A. I>. Davidson, his associates, or any of them, for 

21 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTEXTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

purchase or acquisition of lands from the government or any department thereof, and particularly 
the proposal referred to m Sessii inal Paper 132a, 1893, page 159, being order in council, approved 24th' 
May, 1902, and of all correspondence and other papers in any wise relating to sai I proposal or 
proposals. Also for a copy of any and all recommendations of any such proposals or dealing there- 
with, the commissioner of immigration, or general colonization agent, or either of them, 
referred to in said order in council, together with all correspondence and other papers in anywise 
relating to such recommendations. Also for a copy of any and all acceptance and acceptances, 
consent and consents in writing, by or on behalf of said A. D. Davidson, or associates, or any of 
them ; of or to the terms of disposal of lands, set out in said order in council, and bearing numbers 
i me to time. bi ith inclusive, or of or to any of such terms, together with all correspondence and other 
papers, in any wise relating to such acceptance or consent. Also for a copy of any ami ail agreement 
and agreements in writing, at any time made by the government, or any department thereof, with 
i A. 1 1. Davidson, and associates, or any of them, for sale of lands, based on said order in council, 
approved 24th May, 1903, or on any modification thereof, together with all correspondence and other 
papers in anywise relating to such agreement or agreements. Presented 3rd May. 1906. —3fr. 
Alcorn A 

i:{<>. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 2nd April, 190C, for copies of (a) all plans 
showing proposals of any railway or other corporation, or person, or association of persons, for and 
with regard to expropriation of Whitefish Island, in St. Mary's River. Ontario, or of portions thereof, 
iter or land covered by water, surrounding the same; (6) of all correspondence between 
this government and the government of the province of Ontario, or an> department thereof, and 
with any other person, firm or corporation, relating thereto, and of all reffcrts, decisions, or findings 
upon such applications or proposals ; (c) of all reports of and correspondence with the International 
Vi I li immissii in, with respect to erection, maintenance or alteration of dams, water-powers, 

ither works or erections in St. Mary's River. Presented 3rd May, 1906. — Mr. J: 

Not i 

137. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 25th April, 1906, showing imports and exports 
between United States and Canada for the last fiscal year, on the following agricultural products, 
showing Canadian duty and United States duty, also showing any of the following articles, and 
amount admitted free between United States and Canada : tobacco, corn, potatoes, barley, beans, 
.tits, hay, eggs, fowls, butter, pork, beef, vegetables, apples, wood, cattle, hogs, sheep, horses, hay, 
canned vegetables, canned fruits, evaporated and dried apples, lard, hides and cheese. Presented 
3rd May, 1906. — Mr. Clements Nut printed. 

13S. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April. 1906, for a copy of all orders in 
council, reports, correspondence, documents and papers, relating to the proposed sale, grant or 
disposal by the government of any lands in the province of Alberta, or in the province of 
Saskatchewan, to a syndicate or company i n which Messieurs M. A. Walsh, E. C. Walsh, E. Gr. 
Will', of Clinton, Ohio ; A. W. Carrol, Charles Malar, of Iowa, and J. Brown of Neepawa, Man- 
i either of them are interested, or which they or any or either of them, or any person 
or persons on their behalf, are promoting. Presented 7th May, 1906. Mr. McCarthy, • 

139. Return toi der of the House of Comi is, dated ISth April, 1906, for a copy of all lettei 

respondence and communications between tie' minister of the interior or any department of the 
government and the superintendent under the Children's Protection Act of British Columbia, re- 
specting tlr sale and slavery in British Columbia of young girls for immoral purposes; also a copy 
of all reports and communications from the agentsofthe Indian department in British Columbia, 
wit'. iIk' matters aforesaid, and all replies or communications from th ant to 

Pri tinted 7th May, 1906, ■"'"• Borden (Carleton) v 

llo. Return to an ordei of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing i 1. The nun 

allotments of land scrip and thi rered thereby, made to half-breeds (a) in Manitoba, 

and (b) m tli.- Northwest, betwi en 1-' July, 1904, mid 81st I tecember, 1905. 2. The numbei of land 
warrants, if an] -' covered thereby, issued for military services within the Bame 

'■ The mux p, it my, and thi acres i covered thereby, issued to the Northwest 

Moi I II period. I. The number and acreage ol all tin 'In. outstanding 

on the 31st December, 1905. Ul the ibove information being required in order to bring the infor- 
mal " d in Sessional Paper No. 67<J, brought down the lath .Inly. 1904, up to the end of 

thelastcal I i ted 7th May, 1906. Mr Rocfci (Marquetti Hot printed. 

an 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTEXTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

14 1. Return to an i >rder of the Hon-.- 1 if Commi ins, dated 19th March, 1906, for copies of all correspon- 
dence had with the department of the interior, or the minister of that department, or any member 
of the government, including all statements, charges or information, made against or concerning 
Philip YVagnei. at one time in the employ of the government. PresenteJ 8th May, 1906. — Mr. 
Foster Not pr- 

142. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 3(lth of April, 1906, for a copy of all correspond- 
ence and papers relating to any and all applications made by or on behalf of the (Treat Northern 
Railway Company for subsidies; also what subsidies were granted to that railway, by whom or 

a such subsidies were applied for, on what dates, for what portions of che rail- 
way, and of what amounts, on what terms and conditions were subsidies granted, and to what 
corporations such subsidies, or any part or parts thereof, were paid. Presented 10th 
May, 1906.— Mr. Bo.nct Not printed. 

143. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 5th April. 1906, for copies of all corr?spondence, 
reports, telegrams, valuations and memoranda in . of the government, or any member or 
official thereof, with reference to damages for lands expropriated for railway purposes on the line 
built between Montague, and Cardigan. Prince Edward Island : also names of commissioners or 
valuators, or both ; c valuations made, by whom made, giving the names and the amounts 
separately awarded to each : also li>t of names of persons who accepted valuators' award*, am 

of persons whose valuations have not been accepted by the government; also list of persons who 
have been paid or accepted valuations. Presented 10th May. 1906.— Mr. McL en's). 

Not printed. 

144. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906: 1. For copies of all corre- 

indence for the last two years on immigration between the Canadian High Commissioner, in 
London, England, and- Mr. W. T. R. Preston, Dominion Commissioner of Immigration, at London, 
England. 2. For copies of all correspondence for the last two years on immigration between the 
said W. T. R. Preston and Mr. W. T. Griffith. Secretary, High Commissioner's office, London, 

England. Presented 11th May, 1906. — Mr. 1!' ngtonj . Not printed. 

144a. Supplementary return to No. 144. Presented 30th May, 1906 Not printed. 

145. Return to an address of the Senate, dated 27th April. 1906, for a statement showing the conditions 
on which 'lie Songhees Indian Reserve in Victoria has been handed over to the government of 
British Columbia — as to the purchase of a new reserve, the building of dwellings, church, and school 
house, showing also the manner in which it is intended to dispose of the money in the hands of the 
Dominion government tothe credit of the Songhees Indians. Presented 9th May, 1906. — Hon. Mr. 
Macdonald ( Victoria ' Not pr\ 

146. Return to an order of thi II .-• of Commons, dated 9th April, 1900, for a copy of all correspondence, 
papers, &c, between the superintendent of the Prince Edward Island Railway, or other official, with 
other interested parties, relative to the acquiring of the Hodgson property on the St. Peters Road, 
near Charlottetown, and at the entrance of the new bridge, for the purposes of straightening the road. 
Presented 14th May, liKHi. — Mr. Not printed. 

147. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 30th April, 1906, for a copy of all telegrams, 
petition-, orders and correspondence with reference to the removal of the post office from North Lake 
to Blake Point, Prince Edward Island, and to the return of the office to its original location. Pre- 
-ented loth May. 1906.- Ur. McLean, [Queen's] Not printed. 

148. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 18th April. 1906, tor a copy of all report- re 
garding the Riding Mountain timber reserve, since 1st January. 1900, by any officers of the govern- 
ment. Presented loth May. 1900. — Mr. Boehc ( .1/ Not pr 

148a. Supplementary return to No. 148. Presented 22nd May, 1906 Not printed. 

149. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th April, 1906, for a copy of the contract with 
the Chicoutimi Pulp Company regarding the building, maintenance and operation of the piers and 

boomsals' imi, on the Saguenay River ; also a copy of the reports fi i tl of the 

government under which it was decided to build these works, and of all correspondence relating 
thereto. Presented 15th May, 1906.— Mr. Ptrlcg Not pr 

150« Return to an order "f the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing the amounts voted 
and the amount- expended, under their proper heading, each year since 30th dune. 1896, on Port 
llruce harbour : the date ,,f such payments, to whom the payments were made, and the amount paid 

23 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 190G 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

% 

to each person ; the amount paid for actual labour performed ; the amount paid for material not 
used, and when, and the amount paid for material used ; quantity and kind of material purchased, 
and the price, and from whom purchased ; the present actual condition of the harbour ; a copy of 
the estimated cost of the harbour, including dredging and breakwater ; also copies of all advertise- 
ments calling for tenders, as well as all tenders and contracts and correspondence on the subject. 
The names of all dredges employed since 30th June, 1S96, and their owners : also copies of all tele- 
grams, letters, reports, petitions, documents, correspondence, investigations and communications of 
every description in connection with said harbour works ; also a copy of the pay-roll for each year 
since 30tn June. 1890. the names of all foremen, superintendents and inspectors, with their length of 
service a& such, and by whom recommended, and all correspondence in connection with their ap- 
pointment, the names of all civil engineers employed on the works, and by whom recommended, and 
all correspondence in connection therewith ; also the name of the person or persons who paid the re- 
spective amounts at Port Bruce for material furnished and labour performed. Presented 15th May. 
1906.— Mr. Ingram ' Not printed. 

151. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 6th March, 1905, showing the names of resi- 
dents of the Northwest Territories, not entitled to a second homestead, for whom the sanction of the 
department has been given, allowing them to purchase additional quarter sections, subject to ordin- 
ary cultivation conditions : the dates upon which such sanctions were given, the lands which have 
been purchased by such settlers in consequence of this authority, with the price agreed upon, and 
the sum paid down ; also the form in which the authority to make the sale was made known to the 
local agents of Dominion lands. Presented 17th May, 1906. — Mr. Lake Not printed. 

152. Return ti i an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th May,1906,showing the number of Indian agents 
in the employ of the government ; the number of Indians in the Yukon ; the number of Indian 

chools in the Yukon ; the number of officials of the Indian department in the employ of the govern - 
nt in the Yukon ; the number of Indian reserves in the Yukon : the number of Indians in British 
Columbia : the number of Indian schools in British, Columbia : the number of officials of the Indian 
department in the employ of the government in British Columbia ; the numoer of medical officials 
who have received remuneration of any kind out of the Indian department, and the total amount 
thus paid by the government in each province ; the amount of the Indian reserve land disposed of 
1896, and the price per acre received in each case ; the total amount expended in the year 1906 
on the following reserves, respectively : Kettle Point. Stony Point, and Sarnia Reserve, and tie- 
population on each reset ve, and the number of schools and teachers ; the amount of salary paid^to 
the Indian agents in the Yukon and British Columbia; the average Indian population in the re- 
serves in each province of the Dominion ; the number of reserves in the Dominion having a popula- 
tion of less than each respective number given, viz. : 100,75,50,30,20, 10. .">. 3. in tin year 1905; 
tin- total amount paid to Indian department officials of this government in each province of tin' 
Dominion. Presented 17th May, 1906. —Mr. Armstrong Nut printed. 

153. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 17th July, 1905. for copies of all correspondence, 

memorials, reports of inspectors, and all papers whatsoever, relating to the cloemOjpf Lake 

Manitoba from summer fishing. Presented 17th May, 1906. — Mr Crawford Nut pn, 

l.'.l. Return to address of the Senate, dated 14th March, 1906, for all correspondence between the 

oners, the secretary of tie- board of pilot commissioners, or any of Is of that 

. i. at Sydney, Cape Breton, and the department of marine and fisheries, or any of the officials of 
tla- said department, -bowing : 1st. The amount paid into tie- pilots' retiring fund in each year, from 
31st December, 1896, to 31sl December, 1905, repetitively. 2nd. The amount paid into the pilots' 
widow-' and orphans' relief fund from 31st December, 1896, to 31sl I 1 
3rd. Thedispot of the said funds i r during the above-mentioned period; the 

it on hand on Slsl December, L90B m; where it i- deposited; the security 

for its safety for tin benefit of tin- widows and the orphans of the pilots. 4th. Tin' amount on hand 
in these funds, respectively, on 31st December, 1896 ; also all othei co if any, bearing 

m this in • • l'i nted 17th May, 1906. — Hon, Mr. McDonald (Cap: /■ ■ Not t 

155. Return 1 >l thi House of Commons, dated 18th of April, 1906, showing all coal lands 

lorothi ed of during each year from 1896 to 1905, inclusive, giving the area 

dispo vhom, the consideration therefor, thi assignments made, if any, and the 

i '-■ l'i -- nted L'L'nd May, 1 ; . H I 

inted 

24 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

156. Correspondence, &e., relative to the mining rights underlying the surface of the lands as may lie 
required for the right of way, station grounds, &c, of the Western Division of the Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railway. Presented 22nd May, 1906, by Hon. F. Oliver Nat printed. 

157. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 30th April, 1906, for a copy of all correspon- 
dence, letters, papers, lease or leases, relative to the leasing of the Blood Indian Reserve, in the 
province of Alberta, to the McEwan Cattle Company, of Brandon, or any other person or persons. 
Presented 23rd May, 1906.— Mr. SprouU Notprinted. 

15 8. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated ISth April, 1906, for a copy of an order in 
council passed ou or about the 27th .July, 1900, re certain lands in Alberta and Arthabasca. referred 
to in a question asked the government by Mr. Lefurgey on 9th April, instant, together with official 
plan or map showing lands referred to, and all other correspondence and papers in reference th< i 
between the government or any person acting on its behalf, and others, up to the present time. 
Presented 23rd May, 1306.— Mr. Lefurgey Not pn 

159. Record of accidents and casualties investigated by the Board of Railway Commissioners, for the 
year ending 30th June, 1905. Presented 28th May, 1906, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Not pr 

160. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th May, 1906, showing the freight rate- in 
force last year on the Prince Edward Island Railway, and the tariff in force on 1st April, 1906, for 
local traffic ; also a statement of the proportion of through freight rates on the Intercolonial Railway 
carloads of grain for export from Montreal to St. John, New Brunswick, Halifax. Nova Scotia, and 
Sydney. Cape Breton, giving the several distances and the through freight rates charged on grain in 
carloads from Tignish, Prince Edward Island, to St. John. New Brunswick, Halifax, Nova S, 
and Sydney, Cape Breton, by Prince Edward Island Railway, government winter boats and Inter- 
colonial Railway, showing the several distances. Presented 29th May. 1906.— Mr. Lefu 

Not printed. 

161. Report of the commissioners appointed to hold an investigation and report upon the accident which 
occurred on the 5th April, 1906, by the collapse of part of the tower on the west block extension of 
the departmental buildings. Presented 29th May, 1906, by Hon. C. S. Hyman. 

Printed for both distribution rind sessional papers. 

161". The evidence taken before the commissioners appointed to hold an investigation and report upon 
the accident which occurred on the 5th April. 1906, by the collapse of part of the tower on the west 
block extension of the departmental buildings. Presented 19th June, 1906. by Hon. C. S. Hyman. 

Not printed. 

161b. Correspondence in relation to the west block extension and the collapse of the tower. Presented 
22nd June, l'.«i6. by Hon. C. S. Hyman Not pr 

[62. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th May, 1906, showing the total number of 
land patents issued, together with the acreage covered thereby, in and ior the territory included 
within the limits of the present provinces of Manitoba. Saskatchewan and Alberta, between the 1st 
of July, 1901, and the 31st of December, 1905, under each of the following forms of grant : (a i ■ 
mutation grants, (b) homest. ads, (i I Manitoba Act grants, (d) military bounty grants. (<) N'ort 1 
half-breed grants, (/) parish sales, (j) quit claim special grants, i h) railways, (i) sales of mining. 
farming, ranching. &c. I.i) school land sales, (i) special grants, (<) and all others. Presented 29th 
May, 1906. Mi I Notprinted. 

163. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April, 1906. showing what information is 
in po-se--ic rn "f the department of the interior, or any department or member of the government, 
regarding alleged irregular or improper dealings, acts, charges, payments, or account dicer, 

agent or other person in Great Britain or Ireland, or in Europe, in connection with immigration to 
Canada ; what period is covered thereby ; also what communications, if any. upon or in relati 
such matters have been had from or with the High Commissioner for Canada, the commissioner of 
immigration or others, in writing or otherwise ; also a copy of all correspondence, reports and papers, 
if any, relating to such matters. Presented 29th May, 1906.— Mr. Barker Ncjt pr 

16-1. Return to an address .if the Senate, dated loth May. 1906, calling for a statement showing : 1-t. The 
amount paid for the railway known as the Canada Eastern in Xew Brunswick, and the name "f the 
person or persons to whom the purchase money was paid. 2nd. The amount of money expended on 
said rail v government to the 1st of April, 1906, on buildings, repairs, 

25 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTEXTS I >F VOLUME 14— Continued. 

grading, culverts, bridges, ties, rails, and all other expenditures incurred in the improvement of said 
railway. 3rd. The total amount earn..! and received from the passengers, and for freights, separ- 
ately, t.. the Isl of April, L906. 4th. The Dotal expenditure for operating said mad, as a branch of 
the Inten olonial, from the date of purchase to Che 1st of April. 1906. Presented 2'.«tli May, 1906. — 
Hr Not printed. 

165. Return to an address of the Senate, dated 8th May, 1906, for a statement showing : 1. What amount 
lias been paid out annualhj during the last five years for salaries and expenses of the staff chargeable 
with the inspection duties of the life insurance branch of the finance department. 2. Did sueh staff 
perform any duties other than those pertaining to inspection. 3. Names of the officers of such staff. 
4. Salaries paid each such officer. 5. Amounts collected annually from all life insurance companies 
doing business in Canada during the last five years for inspection charges or maintenance charges of 
such branch, or for such other charges incident thereto. 6. On what basis have such charges been 
made and collected. 7. The names of all companies and amounts faid < i h yeai bj nnies. 
Presented 29th May, 1906. — Hon. Mr. Lougheed Not 

166. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 20th February, 1905, showing the number of 
miles of land in the Northwest Territories surveyed m block outlines, and the cost per mile; the 
number of miles of ti wnship outlines, and tl eosl pi i mil : the number of acres subdivided, and 
the- the proportion of open prairie to the whole of the land surveyed ; the contract 
sui ■-. ii.il.' of section line in open prairie: the rate of pay of surveyors employed by the 
day, for the years 1880, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1SI03; th< average for the first four yi 
and the average for the latter four years. Presented 13th June, l'.ut;. — Mr. Ra . i ette). 

Not j 

167. Return to an address of the Senate, dated 16th May. 1906, for cop es i f the North Sydney Harbour 
Commissioners' Report for tic ■calendar years ls'.i7. 1899, 1901 ami I'JOf", showing collections and dis- 
bursements of the said harbour commissioners during these year : also correspondence, if any, res- 
pecting purchase of land for harbour commissioners 5 purposes, with plan d land and har- 
bour. Presented 29th May, 1906. — Hon. Mr. McDonald ,v 

l»;s. Return to an address of the Senate, dated 8th May, 1906, for a statement relating to the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company <>t New York, showing : 1. The amount of life insurance in force in the 
Domini. >u on 31st December, 1905. 2. The amount of security deposit! .1 with the Dominion govern- 
t mem. 3. The nature of the security. 4. If in gold, how much. •">. If in bonds, how much. (i. 
Who are the issuers of the bonds. 7. Are the bonds given in security taken at par or face value, "r 
at the supposed market value S. How is the market value ascertained. 9. What means are rak.-u 
t.. know it the makers or issuers "f bonde taken as security are solvent from year t.> year. 10. In ths 
due of bnn.ls falling below that at which they are taken as security, how would the 
deficiency in the security necessary to be he',.] be made up 11. Has the security deposited by the 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of Ne« York fallen in value at any time below thai necesi 
deposited according to law. Presented 29th May, 1906. — Mr. Maca I Vot printed 

l(ii». !'■ i chapter 16, 4 Edward VII, intituled : ' An Act respecting an arbitration between 
His Majestj and the Grand Trunk Company of Canada.' Presented 29th May, 1906, by the Hon. 
R. W. Scotl -V../ printed. 

1 7(>. \ Report of the Commith f the Honourable the Privy Council, approved by His Excel- 
lency the G G neral on the 14th March. 1906, relating to the extension of thecontraot with 
the American Bunk Note < lompany for a further period of five years ; and correspondence relating 
thereto. Pn i May, 1906, by Hon. W. S. Fielding Wot printed. 

171. R< II if Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing the tmn 

i , nded, under their proper headings, each year since 30th June, 1896, on Port 

Stanlej harbour; the date of such payments, to whom payments wen made, and the amount paid 
to i i ; the amount paid tor actual labour performed; the amount paid for material not 

ntity and kind of material purchased, with the price, and from whom purchased ; the 
pri i ion of the harbour. V, copy of the estimated cost of the harbour, the statement 

in ii el md the bi tkwatei Iso copies of all advertisement i tenders, as well 

dl tenders i leno on the subject; the names of all dredges employed 

on the work uinci -'.11111 June, 1896, and their owners : also copies of all telegrams, letters, reports, 
petition orrespondence, investigations an.l communications ol everj description in 

26 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

connection with said harbour works : also a copy of the pay-roll for each year since 30th June, 1896; 
the names of all foremen, superintendents and inspectors, their length of service as such, and by 
whom recommended, giving all correspond.-na- in connection with their appointment ; and if dis- 
missed or resigned, state reason for paid dismissal or resignation; the names of all civil engineers 
employed on the works, and by whom recommended, and all correspondence in connection there- 
with : also the name of the person or persons who paid the respective amounts at Port Stanley for 
material furnished and labour performed. Presented 31st May, 1900. — Mr. Ingram . .. .Not printed. 

172. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th May, 19T6, for a cop}- of the instructions 
issued; o each grade of civil engineers on the survey of the Montreal, Ottawa and Georgian Bay 
Ship Canal ; also the names of each of the engineers engaged in the several grades, respects 
including transit men. levellers, rod men, and chain men, and the salaries of each. Pres 

May, 1906.— Mr. Taylor Not pr 

173. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 30th April, 1906, for a copy of all papers, 

vouchers and statements in connection with the expenditure oi 31 . 138 o4 on Miminegash harbo 
per Auditor General's Report. 1905, giving names and amounts paid severally for labourers, name-. 
prices and amounts for supplies of stone, brick, poles, plank, and small payments, &c. Presented 
31st May, 1906.— Mr. Lefitrgey Notpri 

174. Copy of an agreement of Charles M. Hatfield to increase the natural rainfall in any locality in the 
Yukon Territory. Presented 31st May. 1906, by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Printed for both distribution and ipers. 

1 75. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 26th March, 1906, for copies of all correspon- 
dence pertaining to complaints received by the government protesting agaiast quarantine from hog 
plague, in Kent County, Ontario. Presented 4th June, 1906. Mr. Not prim 

176. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 25th April, 1906, for a copy of all rep 
evidence. correspondence, documents and papers relating to charges against any of the customs 
officials at Emers in, in the province of Manitoba, during the past two years. Presented 4th June, 
1906. — Mr. Soch( VCa tetU Not printed. 

177. Return to an order of the H immons, dated 18th April, 1906, for a copy of all applications 
from C. F. Caldwell for himself, or by C. 1". Caldwell on behalf of any clients, together with their 
names, or by any other persi in or persons, together with copies of all correspondence or other pa] 

in connection with permission to purchase coal n ining lands in the pwn ince of Alberta. Presented 
4th June, 1906.— Mr. /,' ic X 

178. Return to an order ol of Commons, dated, 23rd April. 1906, for a copy of all corres] 
dence, memi -rand a. reports and telegrams in possession of the government or any member or official 
thereof, in reference to the construction of a new steamer for the winter navigation of th»- Straits of 
Northumberland, including Mr. Duguid's report or recommendations, and those of others co-operat- 
ing with him. and the expenses connected therewith, and to whom paid. Presented 5th June, 

— Mr Ma ' ■ ) A 

179. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April, 190S, for a copy of the plans and 
specifications of the new steamer now being constructed in England. Presented 5th June. 1906. 
— Mr. McLean (Queen't) Not printed. 

180. Return to an address of thi - lated 31st May, 1901 ertificate obtained by 
Commander Spain in the month of February, 1903. Presented 1st June, 1906. — Hon. Mr. Lai 

rinted. 

181. Return to an order ol theHi ns< of Commons, dated 9th May, 1906 tatement showing 
wages paid in different departments of the Prince Edward Island Railway, in the sain'- manni 
published in the Auditor's General's Report with reference to the Intercolonial Railway. Presented 
13th June, 1906. Mr. Lefurgey Votprimtcd. 

182. Return to an order of the House of ( !ommons, dated 14th May, morial re- 

■'I from the Dominion Mai i tig the attenti f the Government to di 

consequent upon the carrying out of the contract with M. I'. Davis or the St. Lawrence I 1 

< ' impany for the hauling of vessels by electrical power in and out of the locks of the Cornwall Canal. 

Presented 13th June, 1906. Mr. Ames .... .\ 

•27 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

183. Return to an order of the House ot Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing the amounts voted 
and the amounts expended, under their proper headings, each year since 30th June, 1896, on Port 
Burwell harbour; the dote of such payments ; to whom the payments were made, and the amount 
paid to each person ; the amount paid for actual labour performed ; the amount paid for material 
not used, and when ; the amount paid for material used ; the quantity and kind of material pur- 
chased, and the price, and from whom purchased ; the present actual condition of the harbour. A 
copy of the estimated cost of the harbour, and a statement showing how much it will cost to finish 
said harbour: the above statement ti i include breakwater and dredging. Also copies of all adver- 
tisements calling for tenders, as well as all tenders and contracts, and correspondence on the sub- 
ject ; tin names < if all dredges employed on the works since 30th June, 1906, and their o\\ nets. And 
copies of all telegrams, letters, reports, petitions, documents, correspondence and communications 
of every description in connection with the said harbour works. Also a copy of the pay-roll for each 
year since 30th June. 1906 ; the names of all foremen, superintendents and inspectors ; their length 
of service as such, and by whom recommended ; with all correspondence in connection with their 
appointment : and if dismissed or resigned, the reason for said dismissal or resignation ; the names 
of all civil engineers win . are or have been employed on the works, and by whom recommended : the 
said return to include Mr. John H. Teall, resident engineer, the date of appointment, dismissal or 
resignation, as the case may be, and the reason for same ; and all correspondence, petitions, tele- 
grams, letters and communications connected therewith. Presented 15th June, 1906. — Mr. Ingram. 

Not printed. 

184. The King's regulations and orders for the militia of Canada, 1904, 1905 and 1906. Presented 19th 
June, 1906, by Sir Frederick Borden If ot printed. 

18 In. Regulations respecting pay. allowances, &c, to the Canadian militia. Presented 19th June, 1906, 
■ by Sir Frederick Borden . . ." Sot printed. 

185. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th May. 1901), showing : In respect of any or 
all ties purchased by the department of railways and canals dining the years 1903-4 and 1904-5, 
from each of the fallowing : D. J. and J. D. Buckley, of Rogersville; John Mahony, of Rog 
ville ; and Jude I.i rallant, of Rogersville : (n) the classes and quantities of ties ; (i) prices paid 

the places of delivery ; (</i the number rejected ; (<■) the name of the inspectors who represented the 
Mini, nt ; (J) the quantity and value of the ties in store at Rogersville at the time of stuck taking 
for the fiscal year 1904 5; (g) a co;iy "f all correspondence, orders or papers of any nature in the 
possession of tin- department of railways and canals, in any official thereof, relating to the ordering, 
purchasing, receiving, checking, inspecting, or refusing of any of said ties. Presented 19th June, 
1 '/. I. Not printed. 

186. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th May, 1906, showing the number of mail 

contracts in Elgin County, ^ivin;; location, number of miles, names of couriers, and prices paid : 
also date of commencement, date of expiration, and names of bondsmen : a No particulars of tenders, 
if any were called for; the name of each preceding contractor, with the name of courier, and the 
price paid. Presented 19th June, 1908. Mr. Ingram Not print' >t. 

I S7 Return to an order of the H mis. of ( 'ominous, dated I lib May, 1906. -bowing : (1) What aid has 
i:i". the Dominion government to the governments of the various provinces of iheDo- 
n. inn m since confederation, for or inward- the building of pio\ incial railways, eithei bj original aid 
or by ultimately of the cost of such undertakings. (2) What railway subsidies or aids 

reed to be granted, by the provinces respectively, have been ultimately paid 
Dominion in aid of such railways during such period. (3) Whal moneys have bees 
paid by the Dominion to the several provinces, respectively, during each such period for or in re- 
spect of such railways or the stool oi bonds thereof, respectively, purchased, acquired or taken over 

in v . „ ,,. Presented 21st June, 1906.- M* . MacdoneU. 

/'■ nt* d For u si •' \ 

188 Return ' mi derof the Hou i ons, dated 14th May, 1906, showing what lands have been 
Canadian Northern Railway Company, in accordance with the order incounoilof 
Hull August, 1903, in ton n !0, both included, in ranges 9, 10, 11 and 12, west of 1st meri 
.bin. \i-i. an ai by the Canadian Northern Railway Company, in the 
bove, that may have reverted to the government bj reason ol the -ai.l company 
ising its right of selection thereto befori Slsl December, 1906, in ace ith the pro- 

visions of ..i.l.i in council ..f lb.' 10th August, 1903. Presented 22nd June, 1906, Mr. S 
( Ma I Not pi 



5 Edw. VII. List of Sessional Papsrs. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

ISSa. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th May, 1906, showing all lands selected by 
the Canadian Northern Railway Company from that portion of the lands reserved for selection by 
the said company, in townships 15 to 20, both included, in ranges 9. 10, 11 and 12, west of 1st meri 
dian. Also a return of all lands patented to the nominees of the Canadian Northern Railway Com- 
pany in the territoryiabove-mentioned, and the names of the patentees, since 29th .Tune, 1905. Pre- 
sented 22nd June, 1906. — Mr. Roche (Marquette) Not printed. 

189. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 21st May, 1906. for a copy of all petitions and 
papers of every kind concerning the claims of certain retired servants of the Hudson's Bay Company, 
under a deed of sale by the said company to Lord Selkirk in 1811. Presented 22nd June, 1906. — 
Mr. McCranep Not printed, 

1 S9a. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 17th July, 1905, for copies of all correspondence, 
documents, and memorials between the government or any member thereof, and the Rev. James 
Taylor, or any other person, on behalf of the retired servants of the Hudson's Bay Company, in 
reference to their claim to a portion of the estate of the late Lord Selkirk. Presented 27th June, 
1906. — ill")-. Lamont Not pn 

190. Return in part to an address of the Senate, dated 27th April, 1906, for a statement of all accidents 
that occurred on the Intercolonial Railway during the years 1897, 1898, 1899, 1900, 1901, 1902, 1903 
1904 and 1905, specifying each accident, whether by collision, derailing, fire or otherwise, and the 
amount of damages of each such accident, mentioning the localities where such accidents occurred. 
Also the amount of losses each year, by theft or otherwise, of goods or freight, in transit, on the 
Intercolonial Railway, for each year as above. Presented 22nd June, 1906 — Hon. Mr. McDonald 
(Cape Breton) Not printed . 

191. Return showing : 1. Wuat sums have been paid Messrs. Ahearn & Soper of Ottawa, in each year 
since 1896. 2. For what supplies or services were these payments made. Presented 25th June. 
1906, by Hon. C. S. Hyman Not printed. 

1 92. Return showing the total sums that have been paid by the government to the Manitoba Free Press 
and Der Nordvtetter Publishing Companies, for all services, for each of the financial year-, commenc- 
ing 1st July, 1900, and ending 30th June, 1905. Presented 25th June, 1901), by Sir Wilfrid Laurier. 

Not p 

193. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 9th May. 1906, for a copy of all correspondence, 
inquiries with officials, engineers, solicitors, contractors and others, bearing upon the accident to the 
wharf at Sorel, together with all documents in connection with the same. Presented 25th June, 1906. 
— Mr. Bla in Not pr> 

194. Return to an address of the Senate, dated 19th June, 1906, calling for a statement since 1st March, 
1904, showing : 1. Which are, more particularly at Quebec, Montreal and Ottawa, the newspapers, or 
the printing companies or firms, which publish advertisements or printed documents on account of 
the commissioners of the Transcontinental Railway. 2. How much has each of these newspapers 
or of these companies or firms received, and what is the date of each payment. 3. For what kind of 
services, advertisements, printing or puffs, and how much for each kind, have these newspapers or 
these companies or firms been paid. Presented 25th June, 1906. —Hon. Mr. Landrn. Not pn 

195. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April, 1906, for a copy of all letters, cor- 
respondence, papers, reports and accounts relating to the construction of a fish ladder at Cowie's 
Ham, lower pulp mill, Milton, Queen's County, N.S, and of the accounts showing the cost of con- 
struction of the said ladder, the amount paid for labour and material, and to whom paid. Presented 
30th June, 1906.— Mr Crocket Not printed. 

196. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 30th April, 1906, shewing, by townships, all 
Indian lands sold or disposed of within the boundaries of the present electoral district of East and 
West Algoma, during the years 1896 to 1905, both inclusive, with the names and addresses of 
purchasers or lessees, and the prices paid or agreed to be paid, for such lands, by way of rental or 
purchase money ; also showing, by townships, when the said purchases were completed, or when the 
final payments were made and the total amount paid for such lands ; also showing, by townships, 
what agreements for sale are in default, and for what period the same have been in default : also 
showing what agreements for sale or lease, by townships, have been cancelled for non-payment of 
purchase money or non-performance of conditions. Presented 3rd July, 19013. — Mr. B 

Not printed 

29 



5 Edw. VII. List of Ses i..nal Paper?. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Continued. 

196n. Return to an order of the House of Common?, dated 30th April, 1906, fur a copy of all the returns 
and reports madi by Indian agents or other officials in the employment of the government, having 

charge of Indian lands in the territory now included within the boundaries of the present electoral 
district- - f East and West Algi ana, showing all sales, transactions and cancellations of lands in such 
territory, from the 1st July. 1896, to the 1st April, 1906. Presented 3rd July, 1906.— Mr. B< 

Not printed, 

197. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 28th May, 1906, for a copy all correspondence 
between Joseph Rirm and the government in reference to the surface right for coal on the northeast 
1 of section 26, township 1, range 6, west ^.f the 2nd meridian. Also a copy of all Utter,, papers and 
telegrams, from any other party or parties in reference to the same. Presented 5th July, 1906. — Mr. 

, Kljt printed. 

liis. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 19;0, for copies of all letters, tele- 
grams, reports or other communications which, between the 1st of July, 191 4, and the 31st December, 
d between the Minister of the Interior, or any official of his department, on the one hand, 
he Canadian Northern Railway Company ;(&) the Manitoba and Southeastern Railway Com- 
pany ; if) the Qu'Appelle, Long Lake and Saskatchewan Railway Company, or any company to 
whom any of said companies shall have transferred its land rights, in regard to the area in which 
any of said companies were to be permitted to select land due by way of subsidy. Presented 5th 
July, 1906.- Mr. Ames Notprinted. 

199. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 21st March, li)06. showing : 1. The description 
of all lands in Manitoba and the Northwest, formerly reserved for timber or hay purposes, to which 
homestead entrii - have been granted since 1st January. 1905. 2. The dat ;of decisions to open such 
reservations for settlement. 3. The nan es of applicants, in order of application, on 'he books of the 
vai i' - and sub-agencies, for each quarter section, at the date when the entry was granted. 
Presented 5th July, 1906.— Mr. Lake A 

•200. Return to an order to the House of Commons, dated 21st March, 1906, showing the number of 

applications for inspection received at the several land agencies in Manitoba and the Northwest for 

h month of the years 1904 and 1005, from honn steaders desiring to secure their patents. Si. The 

number of inspections made monthly from each agency. 3. The number of applications for inspec 

tion on file 1st January. 1006, at each agency. Presented 5th July, 1906. Mr. Laki .Notprh 

201. Return to an address of the Bouse of Commons, dated 2nd April, lOOii. for copies of all correspond- 
ence betv the pilotage commissioners, the s< en tary of thi Board of Pilot Commission' re, or any 

bhe officials of that board, at Sidney, Cape Breton, and the department of marine and fisheries, 

ifficials of the said department, and all orders in council, regulations, memoranda, 

books, documents and papers, bowing : (1) the amount paid into the pilots' retiring fund in each 

year from the 31st Decembei 1896, to 31st December, 1905, respectively; (2) the ai mt paid into 

the pilots' widows' and orphan.-' relief fund from 31st December, 1896, to 31st December, 1906, 
respectively; (3) the disposition made of the said funds in each year during the above-i 
period ; the amount on hand on the 31s t December, loo5 : the interest it bears; where it is deposit- 
ed ; the security for its safety for the benefit of the vi idowsand orphans of the pilots ; ill the amount 
n tle>r funds, respectively, on 31st December, L896. Alsoall other correspondence, if any, 
m this matter. Presented 6th July, 1006. - Mr. Boya Not pr 

2t>2. Return to an order of the Hon f Common-, dated lliii March. 1906, showing (a) how many 

wrecks occurred in the river and gulf of St. Lawrence during the season of 1906; [b) the names. 

tonn ' so wrecked ; (c) whether suoh wreel i i, total loss of the 

ship. oid thei in an] and what ea.-i - ; I'll to what causes each of said wrecks were 

ributable ; (e) whether any inquiry was held in any and wha cast opy of all reports, 

pondence, documents and paper.-, relating t ■ connected with the said wrecks, the 

oid the loss thereby occasioned. Presented 5th July, 1906.— Mr. 
/.' A 

202a, Ret i on to an addie— of t in Senate, dated 16th March, L906, foi a copy of all the instructions given, 

of all tl videnoe heard, of the judgment rendered, and of all communications exchanged on the 

subject ol the wreck of the teamer Bavarian last autumn upon the Wye locks, and of the inquiry 

held thereinto, as well as ol Bpondenoe exchanged between the department of marine and 

fishi my person v ^rding the choice of the judge holding the inquiry and of his 

, looo. // >>. Mr. l.untti'i 2yol printed. 

30 



5 Echv. VII. List of Sessional Papers. A. 1906 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME 14— Concluded. 

203. Return to an order of the House of Commons, 'lit.- 1 28th May. 1906, forcopies of all correspondence 

een any minister of any department and the company of the port of Chicoutimi or any other 
company or person regarding the dredging of the Saguenay down to the present year. Presented 
7th J Mr.Girard Not printed. 

204. Return to an address of the House of Commoi -'3rd April, 1906, for a copy of all orders in 
council, reports, letters, telegrams, communications, documents and papers of every kind, relating 
to the establishment, acquisition, construction, enlargement and maintenance of a hospital for 
trachoma patients at or near Halifax, N.S., including a statement of all sums of money expended in 
connection therewith, whether for establishment, acquisition, construction, enlargement or main- 
tenance ; also a statement of the person or persons to whom such moneys were paid, the amount 
paid in each instance, as well as the date of payment, and generally all particulars concerning the 
said hospital from the time when it was first established. Presented 7th July. 1906. — Mr. II" 
(Lennox and Addington) Not printed. 

205. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 14th March, 1906, showing in the case of every 
homestead against which, during the year 1904 and 1905 a report of non-compliance with the law, 
or a demand for cancellation has been received by the Dominion land office or offices : giving (a) the 
location of said quarter section range, township and meridian ; (6) the name and address of the party 
by whom the original entry was made : (c) the name and address of the party or parties (if there 
haie been several) who endeavoured to lodge cancellations : ('<) the reason alleged by complaints why 
cancellation of entry should be allowed ; (c) whether warning of threatened cancellation was served 
upon the alleged delinquent ; (/) the action taken by the department in each case. Presented 9th 
July, 1906.— Mr. Ama » 

200. Return to an order of the House of Commons, dated 30th April, 1906, showing in detail for each year 
from 1 S '-<1 to 1895, inclusive : 1. A statement of all goods supplied to Mr. Speaker's apartments, and 
the amount paid therefor. 2. An inventory of all goods in the apartments taken on the vacation of 
the office of Speaker, by Mr. Bain, Mr. BrodeurandMr. Belcourt and any reports of the Clerk of the 
Bouse, the Serjeant-at-Arms, or other officer, with reference to the inventories, the goods supplied. 
their condition and the care and disposition of the same. 3. A copy of all corresjxjndence had by 
the Speak mber of the Internal Economy Commission, the Clerk of the House, the Audi- 

tor General, or any of the other officers of the House of Commons, in reference to the purchase, pay- 
ment, cheeking, distribution, replenishing, disposal or care of the same. 4. A copy of all res 

ied by the Internal Economy Commission in reference to the above matters. Presented 9th July. 
1906.— Mr. Lancaster A 

207. Return to an address of the House of Commons, dated 23rd April. 1906, for copies of all correspon- 
dence since 1N% between the Government of Canada, or any member thereof, and the German or 
British Governments, or any person . i persons officially or otherwise representing those govern- 
ments : and copies of all documents and papers in possession of the government, respecting the 
tariffs of Germany and Canada, in relation to each othei r - .red 11th July. 1906.— Mr. 
strong Wi 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 A. 1906 



(33) 

REPORT OF THE JOINT LIBRARIANS OF PARLIAMENT FOR 1905. 

To the Honourable the Speaker of the Senate: 

To (he Honourable the Speaker of the House of Commons: 

The Joint Librarians of Parliament have the honour to report as follows for the 
year 1905 : — 

The course of public discussion during the year has been followed with some care, 
and members will find the shelves and the card catalogues ready to respond to all de- 
mands made upon them for information on current questions. 

The necessity of keeping the legal section, especially that devoted to the legisla- 
tion of the United States and the various States of the Union, up to date, has com- 
pelled a reduction in the expenditure for general literature. 

During the recesss the French part of the political economy and social science 
catalogue has been remodelled so as to bring it up to the most modern classification of 
science. These changes have been made both in the catalogue by subjects and in the 
card system. 

The card catalogue of the Canadian section of History and Literature has also 
been completed. 

At the last session a sum of $100,000 was voted by parliament for repairs and ad- 
ditions to the parliamentary building. The Librarians understand that out of the 
said amount a sum of $80,000 has been set aside to provide increased accommodation to 
the Library. That larger space is needed in this department, the shelving which the 
Librarians have been compelled to crowd on the floor of the Library, only too evidently 
shows. 

It is to be hoped that when parliament meets again, this long-felt want will have 
been supplied. According to the plans of the Chief Architect of the Public Works 
Department, the proposed additions will provide space for 180,000 volumes. 

Among the donations of the year may be specially noted a valuable collection of 
the publications of the Chicago University, presented by the president, the late Dr. 
Harper, who paid the Library a prolonged visit and exhibited the deepest interest in 
its contents and management. 

The annual list of accessions is in the hands of the King's Printer, and will be 
available for distribution at an early date. 

The list of donations is, as usual, annexed. 

The whole is respectfully submitted. 

A. D. DeCELLES, G.L. 
MARTIN J. GRIFFIN, P.L. 

Library of Parliament, 
March 8, 1906. 



33—1 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIASS 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

From Mrs. E. Stevens, Brooklyn, N.T.: 

Stevens Genealogy. Descendants of the Fitz-Stephen Family in England 
and New England, 1904. 

From W. W. White, Esq., Mayor of St. John, N.B.: 

St. John Corporation Accounts, 1903. 
From the Author, Sir Wm. Willcocks, Cairo: 

The Nile in 1904 (its hydrology ). 

From the Author, Bev. B. Ph. Sylvain, Bimouski: 
Sfgr. Langevin, sa mort. 
Le College industriel de Rimouski. 

From the American Exchange National Bank: 
The Clearing House of New York City. 

From the American Historical Association: 
Eeport for 1903. Vol. 2. 

From the Baltimore Board of Trade: 
Report for 1904. 

From the Baltimore Chamber of Commerce: 
Report for 1904. 

From the City of Birmingham. England: 

General and Financial Statement, 1904-5. 

From the Boston Chamber of Commerce: 
Report for 1904. 

From Canadian Manufacturers Association, Toronto: 

Official Souvenir. Account of Manufacturers Visit to Great Britain in 1905. 

From the Chicago University: 

Decennial Publications, 1st series, 10 vols. 
" " 2nd scries, 16 vols. 

Howard. History of Matrimonial Institutions. 3 vols. 

From the Chicago Board of Trade: 
Report for 1904. 

From the Chicago Great Western "Railway Co.: 
Report for 1905. 

From the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Bail way Co.: 
Report for 1905. 

From the Co-operative Wholesale Societies, Manchester: 
Ann i'.'05. 

From the Delaware, Lackawana and Western Railway Co.: 
Report for 1904. 

From the Duhilh Hoard of Trade: 
Report for 1903. 

From the Hartford Board of Trade: 
Report for 1905. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIANS 3 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 

From the Institute of Civil Engineers, London: 
Minutes of Proceedings. Vol. 15. 

From the Insurance Institute of Toronto: 
Proceedings, 1904-5. 

From the U.S. Library of Congress: 

Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789. Edited from Original 

Records. Vol. 1, 1774. 8vo. Washington, 1904. 
Livingstone, E., Expose d'un systeme de Legislation criminelle. 

From Louisiana Purchase Exposition Co.: 

Congress of Arts and Science of St. Louis Exposition, 1904: Philosophy and 
Mathematics, Vol. 1. 

From the IIcGill University, Montreal: 

Papers on Engineering : Geology : Zoology : Chemistry and Mineralogy, 1901. 

From the Melbourne Chamber of Commerce: 
Report for 1904-5. 

From the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce: 
Report for 1904. 

From the Montreal Board of Trade: 
Report for 1904. 

From the New York Chamber of Commerce: 
Report for 1904-5. 

From the New York Produce Exchange: 
Report for 1904-5. 
Statistical Report for 1904. 

From the Northern Pacific Railway Co.: 
Report for 1904-5. 

From the Royal Military College Club, Kingston: 
Poceedings, 1S99, 1901-1904. 

From the Royal Humane Society: 
Report for 1904. 

From St. Louis Trade and Commerce Association: 
Report for 1904. 

From the San Francisco Board of Trade: 
Report for 1905. 

From the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce: 
Report for 1905. 

From Toronto University : 

Papers on History: Economics: Biology and Chemistry, 1905. 

From Vancouver Board of Trade: 
Report for 1904-5. 

From Victoria Board of Trade: 
Report for 1904. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIANS 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

From the Librarian of West Point Academy: 

History of the Battle Monument at West Point. 
From the Winnipeg Board of Trade: 

Keport for 1904. 
From the Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange: 

Reports for 1903-5. 
From the Government of the Territory of Arizona: 

Revised Statutes, to 1901- 

Annual Laws, 1903-1905. 

From the Government of the Australian Commonwealth: 
Parliamentary Debates, Vols. 18-24. 

Papers, 1904, Vols. 2-3. 
Votes and Proceedings of the House, 1904, Vol. 1. 
Senate Journals and Special Papers, 1904, Vol. 1. 
House Standing Orders. 

m the Government of the Bahamas: 
Laws, 1904. 

From the Government of Barbados: 
Laws, 1904-5. 
Blue Book, 1904-5. 

From the Government of Brazil: 
Annuario Commercial, 1904. 

From the Government of British Columbia: 

Statutes, 1905. 
Assembly Journals, 1903-4. 
Sessional Papers, 1903-4. 
Official Gazette, 1905. 

From the Government of British Honduras: 

Blue Book, 1904. 
From the Government of the State of California: 

Statutes, 1899, 1903, 1905. 
Fom the Government of the Cape of Good Hope: 

Acts, 1905. 

Votes and Proceedings of Assembly, 1905. 
Amu \tures to Votes and Proceedings, 1905. 
Council Minutes and Annextures, 1905. 

Committees, Reports, 1905. 
Assembly Committees, Reports, 1905. 
Statistical Kegister, 1903. 
Civil Service List, 1905. 
Theal's Record of the Colony, Vols. 25-27. 

From the Government nf the State of Colorado: 
Laws for 1905. 

until of lli,- SI, ile of Connecticut: 
\-i-. 1905. 



REPORT OF THE I.I nil Mil 1 .\ S 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



Public Documents, 1903-4. 

Labour Report, 1904. 

Historical Society Collections, Vol. 10. 

Register and Manual, 1905. 

Geological and Natural History Suryev Bulletin, Vols. 3-5. 

Miscellaneous Pamphlets, 1903-5. 

From' the Government of Germany: 

Parliamentary Papers, 1903-5, 11 vols. 

From the Government of Grenada: 
Blue Book, 1904. 
Ordinances, 1901-5. 

From the Government of India: 

Bengal Code, 3rd Ed., 1905. 2 vols. 
Ajmer Code, 1905. 
Central Provinces Code, 1904. 
Indian Articles of war, 1904. 

From the Government of the State of Indiana: 

Senate Journal, 1905. 

House Journal, 1905. 

Documentary Journal Reports, 1903, 1904. 

Auditor's, Fisheries, Agriculture, Geological and Statistical Reports. 1903-4. 

Miscellaneous Reports, 1903-1904. 14 vols. 

From the Government of Jamaica: 

Hand Book, 1905. 

From the Government of the State of Kansas: 

Laws, 1905. 

Law Repots. Vols. 68, 69. 
Public Documents, 1903-4. 
Senate Journal, 1905. 
House Journal, 1905. 

From the Government of the State of Maine: 

Laws, 1905. 

Public Documents, 1905. 4 vols. 

Law Reports. Vol. 99. 

Senate Documents, 1905. 

House Documents, 1905. 

Manual, 1905. 

Report of Industrial and Labour Statistics, 1904. 

York Deeds. Vol. 13. 

From the Government of Malta: 
Ordinances, 1886-1888. 

From the Government of Manitoba: 

Laws, 1905. 

Journals and Sessional Papers, 1905. 

Official Gazette, 1905. 

From the Government of the State of Massachusetts- 

Acts, 1905. 

Senate House Journals, 1905. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIANS 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Law Eeports. Vols. 186, 187, 188. 
Public Documents, 1903. 12 vols. 
Labour Statistics. Eeport, 1904. 

From the Government of Mauritius: 

Debates of tbe Council, 1903-4. 
Government Notifications, 1904. 
Blue Book, 1904. 

From the Government of Mexico: 
Blue Books, 1902-1904. 

From the Government of the State of Michigan: 
• Laws, 1S99, I 

From the Government of the State of Minnesota: 
Laws, 1905. 
Law Eeports. Vols. 91-93. 

From tht Government of the State of Montana: 
Law-. 1897, 1899, 1901, 1903, 1905. 

From the Government of the State of Nebraska: 
Documents, 1901-2. 4 vols. 
Lindsay's Supreme Court Cases. Vol. 4. 

From the Government of New Brunswick: 

Laws, 1905. 

Assembly Journals, 1905. 

Official Gazette, 1905. 

From the Government of Newfoundland: 
Crown Lands Act, 1903. 
Mineral Beport, 1902-3. 

(cultural Commissions Beport, 1898. 
Minerals and Mining Beport, 1904. 
Customs Beturns, 1903-4. 

■i the Government of the State of Ntw Hampshire: 

Laws, 1905. 

Law Beports, 1903-4. 

Annual Eeports, 1903-4. 

From rnment of the State of New Jersey: 

ira, 1905. 
Legislative Documents, 1904. 
Senate Journal, 1904. 
A~-.i-inl.lv Journal, 1904. 
tve Manual, 1905. 
litj K. port-. Vols. 65, 66. 
I Vols. 70, 71. 

Statistical Report, 1905. 
St;> Report, 1904. 

[ndea to Laws, L663-1908. 

Sout) 
Statutes, 1904. 
Pari r ■ Papers, 1904. 4 \ 



REPORT <)F THE LIHRART.W* 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



Assembly Votes and Proceedings, 1904. 2 vols. 

Debates.' Vols. 15-17. 

Statistical Register, 1903. 

Coghlan's Statistical Account of Australia and New Zealand, I'm.'. ( 

Year Book, 1905. 

From the Government of the State of New York: 

Senate Documents, 1902. 12 vols. 
1903. 16 vols. 
" Journals, 1903-1901. 1 vols. 
Assembly Documents, 1901. 5 vols. 
" " 1902. 20 vols. 

1903. 17 vols. 
" Journals, 1903-1904. 6 vols. 
State University Museum Reports, 1902. 4 vols. 
College Reports, 1903. 
" " Documents, 1904-5. 4 vols. 

" Library Report, 1903. 
" " Bulletin, 1903-4. 

Supreme Court Reports. Vols. 94-96. 
Tear Book of Legislation, 1903. 
Legislative Manual, 1905. 
Clinton's Public Papers. Vol. 7. 
New York and the War with Spain. 

From the Government of New Zealand: 
Laws, 1905. 

Appendix to Journals, 1904. 
Debates. Vols. 130-131. 
Report on Minerals and Mining, 1905. 

From the Government of the North-west Territories: 

Ordinances, 1904. 
Official Gazette, 1905. 

From the Government of Nova Scotia: 

Laws, 1905. 

Council Journals, 1905. 
Assembly Journals, 1905. 
Official Gazette, 1905. 

From the Government of the State of Ohio: 
Executive Documents, 1903. 
Senate Journal, 1904. 
House Journal, 1904. 
Departmental Reports, 1903-4. 8 vols. 

From the Government of the State of Oklahoma: 
Law Reports. Vol. 14. 

From the Government of Ontario: 
Laws, 1904. 

Assembly Journals, 1905. 
Sessional Papers, 1904. 10 vols. 
" " 1905. 12 vols. 

Official Gazette, 1905. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAXS 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
From the Government of the Orange River: 

Consolidated Laws, 1901. 
Ordinances, 1902-1903. 
Proclamations to 1902. 
Council Debates, 1903-1904. 
" Minutes, 1903. 

From the Government of the State of Pennsylvania : 

Laws, 1905. 

Statutes at Large. Vol. 10. 
Legislative Hand-book, 1905. 
Supreme Court Eeports. Vols. 25-27. 
Law Eeports. Vols. 209-211. 

From the Government of Prince Edward Island: 

Laws, 1905. 

Assembly Journals, 1904. 

Official Gazette, 1905. 

From the Government of Quebec: 
■ Laws, 1905. 

Si ssional Papers (French and English), 1904-1905. 
Council Journals, 1905. 
Assembly Journals, 1905. 
Official Gazette, 1905. 
Library Catalogue, 1903. 

From the Government of Queensland: 

Acts, 1904-5. 
Debates. Vols. 93-94. 

From the Government of St. Lucia: 
Administration Eeports, 1903. 

From the Government of South Australia: 

Acts, 1904. 

Debates, 1904. 

Proceedings of Parliament, 1904. 

From the Government of Tasmania: 
Acts, 1905. 
Journals and Papers of Parliament, 1904. 2 vols. 

From the Gove nun, nt of the Transvaal: 

imates, Revenue and Expenditure, 1906. 

m the Government of Trinidad and Tobago: 
Blue Book, 1004-5. 

From tli- -nent of the United States: 

Senate Documents, 1903-4. 38 vols. 

1904-5. 14 vols. 

Eeports. 1903-4. 7 vols. 

1904-5. 2 vols. 

House 1 1 -. 1903-4. 120 vols. 

rts, L903-4. 9 vols. 

" Doc iments, 1904 6. 66 vols. 

" 1904-6. 3 vols. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN'S 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 33 



Senate House Journals, 1904-5. 
Congessional Record (Debates). Vol. 39, 5 parts. 
Report Census Benevolent Institutions. 
Mines ami Quarries. 
" '• Philippine Islands. 

Consular Service. Vols. 75-79. 
Court of Claims. Vol. 40. 
" Fish Commission, 1903. 

Bulletin of Fisheries. Vol. 24. 
" Foreign Commerce and Navigation, 1904. 
" Immigration, 1904. 
" Interior Dept., 1904. 
Labour, 1904. 
Handbook of Submarine Cables. U.S. Army, 1905. 
Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789. 

Manual of Electrical Instruments and Telephones, U.S. Army, j.905. 
Public Lands Decisions. Vol. 33. 
Treasury Decisions, 1904-5. 
Statistical Abstract, 1904. 
From the Government of Victoria : 
Statutes, 1904. 
Debates. Vols. 107-109. 

From the Government of the Slate of Vermont: 

Laws, 1904. 

Law Reports. Vols. 76, 77. 

Senate Journal, 1904. 

House Journal, 1904. 

State Officers Reports, 1903-4. 

Legislative Directory, 1904. 

Insurance, Finance, Railroad and Health Reports, 1902-4. 

Miscellaneous Reports in Pamphlet form. 

From the Government of the State of Washington: 

Laws, 1905. 
From the Government of Western Australia: 

Laws, Consolidated, 1896-1900. 
" 1903-4. 
" Index to, 1832-1894. 

Proceedings of Parliament. 

Debates. Vols. 23, 24. 

Statistical Register, 1896-1897. 

Blue Book, 1S98, 1899. 

Year Book, 1893-4. 1896-7, 1898-9. 

From the Government of the State of Wisconsin: 

Laws, 1903-1905. 

From the Government of the Vukon Territory: 

Ordinaries, 1903, 1904, 1905. 



33—2 



5-6 EDWARD VII 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



A. 1906 



REPORT 



OF THE 



MINISTER. OF JUSTICE 



PENITENTIARIES OP CANADA 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDED JUNE 80 



1 9 5 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST 

EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1906 

[No. 31—1906.] 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER N 9 . 14 A. 1908 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable Sir Albert Henry George, Earl Grey, Viscount 
Howick, Baron Grey of Howick, in the County of Northumberland, in the Peerage 
of the United Kingdom and a Baronet; Knight Grand Cross of Our Most Dis- 
tinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George. &c, £c. Governor General 
of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Excellency, the 
Annual Report of the Inspectors of Penitentiaries for the Year ended June 30. 1905. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

C. FITZPATEICK, 

Minister of Justice. 

Department of Justice, 

Ottawa, January 6, 1906. 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



CONTENTS 

Inspector's Report 1 — 11 

Appendix A. — Dominion Parole Officer's Report 15 — 22 

B.— Wardens' Reports 23 — 41 

C. — Surgeons' Reports 43 — 57 

" D.— Chaplains' Reports 59 — 69 

E. — School Instructors' Reports 71 — 78 

F. — Matrons' Reports 79 — 82 

G. — Crime Statistics S3 — 125 

H.— Labour Statistics 127 — 131 

" I.— Cost per capita 133 — 136 

J. — Revenue Statements 137 — 140 

K. — Expenditure Statements 141 — 173 

" L.— List of Officers 175 — 183 

" M— Farm Reports 185 — 195 

" N. — Regina Jail Reports 197 — 209 

O.— Prince Albert Jail Reports 211—225 

P.— Yukon Penitentiaries Reports 227 — 239 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



INSPECTORS' REPORT 



Ml 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF PENITENTIARIES 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR 1904-5 



To the Honourable Charles Fitzpatrick, K.C., 

Minister of Justice. 

Sir, — We have the honour to submit herewith reports and statistics in connection 
with the penitentiaries and territorial jails of Canada for the fiscal year ended June 
30, 1905. 

The report of the Inspector of Penitentiaries for the Yukon Territory will be 
found in ' Appendix P.' 

The following tabulated statistics refer to the penitentiaries under our supervision 
only, and do not include the statistics of the Yukon penitentiaries or of the territorial 
jails. 

POPULATION. 

The average population of the penitentiaries for the past ten years has been as 
follows : — 

1895-6 1,314 

1896-7 1,353 

1897-8 1,415 

1898-9 1,447 

1899-0 1,430 

1900-1 1,405 

1901-2 1,294 

1902-3 1,224 

1903-4 1,286 

1904-5 1,359 

The increase as compared with the previous fiscal year is equal to 5 7 i>er <-c-nium. 
34—1 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



MOVEMENTS OF CONVICTS. 















l": 




o 

— 
>> 


Received. 






Released. 














>-> 






Penitentiary. 


3 

1-5 

>-> 




oji 




§ 










QD 
Q 




1 


>, 




■0 

DQ 


"3 

?, 


1 


"J" 

4) 


"3 


'3. 

X 


c 
o 
■n 


C 


C 
m 








°t 

OJ o 


•0 

o 

-*» 
3 




a 

— < 


o 


>> 


C 


— 


- 
- 


ci 


7- 


'-" ■- — 


£ c'~ 


B 




s 


e h 


H 


W 


P- 


- 


H 


O H 


H 




448 
365 


134 




587 

501 


S6 15 


29 2 


6 1 


1 




448 


St. Vincent de Paul 


135 1 


S7 1S 


33 


3 


2 




357 




250 
156 
109 


101 1 2 
104 


354 
261 
168 


67 5 
40 11 

17 1 


43 
14 

7 


1 
1 








5 

1 


233 




2 
1 


1 

2 


*2 


190 




59 




139 




........ 


•' 






1,328 


533 7 


3 


1,873 


297 50 


126 


7 


11 


4 


3 6 


1,367 



*1 recaptured. 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF PAROLES, PARDONS, DEATHS AND ESCAPES. 



Paroles 



Pardons. 



Deaths. 



Escapes. 



1898-9 . 
1899-0 . 
1900-1 . 
1901-2 . 
1902-3 . 
1903-4 . 
1904-5 . 



71 
122 
157 
113 
122 
126 



80 
70 
36 
43 
35 
31 
50 



17 
22 
25 
14 
16 
23 
11 



1 
*3 



*1 recaptured. 

The record of escapes is unsatisfactory. In each case the escape was due to care- 
lessness, or lack of alertness, on the part of the subordinate officer in charge of the 
gang. 

The parole system has been operated successfully, and the report of the officer in 
charge of that work will be found in ' Appendix A.' The results shown are a very 
complete vindication of the system and of the discretion exercised in its administra- 
tion. The previous experience of Mr. Archibald, as an officer of the Salvation Army 
in charge of prison gate work, enabled him to take up the work of supervising 
paroled convicts with a degree of intelligence that has ensured greater success than 
otherwise would have been possible. 

AGE. 



Years. 


1901-2 


1902-3. 


1903^1. 


1904-5. 


20 


134 
493 
29S 
174 
73 
42 


156 
504 

17ii 
68 
46 


161 
538 
342 
189 
66 
32 


169 


From 20 to 3d 


595 


30 to 40 


334 


From 40 to 50 


170 


From 50 to 60 


64 


Over 80 


35 




1.214 


1,250 


1,328 


1 .3(17 



REPORT OF INSPECTORS OF PEXITEXT! ARIES 3 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

It will be observed that those under twenty years of age constitute one-eighth of 
the entire prison population. 

The facilities afforded for acquiring mechanical trades may be of value to lads 
whose manual training has been neglected, but it should not be overlooked that asso- 
ciation with experienced criminals enables these lads to acquire evil habits and ten- 
dences that greatly outweigh the benefits to be obtained. 

The penitentiary is adapted to those whose criminal habits have been formed, and 
who therefore require reformation in the full sense of that expression. It is a very 
undesirable place for those whose habits are unformed and whose character is yet in 
the plastic or formative condition. 

Duration of Sentences — 

Under 2 years (military prisoner) 1 

2 years 234 

Over 2 years and under 3 years 37 

3 years 318 

Over 3 years and under 4 years 15 

4 years 136 

Over 4 years and under 5 years 7 

5 years 217 

Over 5 and under 6 7 

6 years 27 

7 years 116 

8 years 21 

9 years 9 

10 years 82 

12 years 20 

14 years 20 

15 years 24 

16 to 18 years 4 

20 years 13 

21 to 25 years 6 

Life 53 

1,367 

Racial — 

White 1,244 

Coloured 55 

Indian 27 

Indian half-breed 27 

^Mongolian 14 

1,367 
34—1 1 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
NATIONALITY. 

British — 

Canada 875 

England 150 

Ireland 46 

Scotland 27 

Newfoundland 4 

Australia 6 

West Indies 3 

1,111 

Foreign — 

United States 121 

Italy 23 

Austria 22 

Germany 19 

France 12 

Russia 12 

China 11 

Denmark 10 

Norway and Sweden 9 

Mexico 4 

Belgium 3 > 

Syria 3 

Japan 3 

Greece 2 

Portugal 1 

Switzerland 1 

256 

1.367 
Civil Condition — 

Single -913 

Married 411 

Widowed 43 

1,367 
Social Habits — 

Abstainers 197 

Temperate 654 

Intemperate 516 

1,367 

Education — 

( !annot read '>r write 213 

Can read only 106 

Can read and write 1,048 

1,367 



REPORT OF INSPECTORS OF PEXITEXTIARIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Creed — 

Roman Catholic 672 

Church of England 274 

Methodist 148 

Presbyterian 132 

Baptist 69 

Lutheran 30 

Buddhist 14 

Mormon 6 

Jewish 4 

Adventist. . . . : 3 

Unitarian 2 

Congregationalist 2 

Salvation Army 2 

Greek Catholic 2 

TJniversalist 1 

Quaker 1 

No creed 5 



1,367 



COMPARISON ON PERCENTAGE BASIS. 



Number 

of 
Convicts. 



Percentage 
of prison popu- 
lation. 



Number to 

each 10.000 of 

population, 

a-s per last 

census. 



Buddhist 

Church of England 

Lutheran 

Roman Catholic. . . 

Jewish 

Baptist 

Salvation Army. . 

Methodist 

Presbyterian. 

Greek Catholic . . . 
Congregation:ili-T . . 



14 

274 

30 

672 

4 

69 

2 

149 

132 



1.02 

20.04 

2.12 

49.16 

.29 

5. 

. 15 

Hi s:; 

9 . 66 

.15 

l.-, 



13.5 
4. 
3.2 
3. 
2.4 
2.1 
1.9 
1.6 
1.6 
1.3 
.7 



FINANCIAL, 



Penitent iarv. 



Gross 
Expenditure. 



Revenue. 



Net 
Expenditure. 



cts. 



Kingston 

St. Vincent de Paul 

Dorchester 

Manitoba 

British Columbia.. . 



cts. 



$ cts. 



146,447 50 

104,014 37 

59,693 35 

69.10S 03 
.50.274 38 


12 BOO 71 
4,158 1 3 
2,407 IS 
4,601 73 
1,798 76 


103,646 79 
99,855 94 

57.286 17 
64,506 30 

1^ 175 62 


429,537 63 


55,766 81 


373.770 82 



DEPARTUEST OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF COST PEE CAPITA. 



Kingston. 



St. Vincent 
de Paul. 



Dorchester. 



Manitoba. 



British 

Columbia. 



Staff 

Maintenance of convicts 
Discharge expenses . . . . 

Working expenses 

Industries 

Lands, buildings, &c. . . 
Miscellaneous 

Deduct revenue 

Net per capita 



S cts. 

147 11 

47 59 

6 5S 

29 75 

41 96 

29 60 

3 4s 



306 07 
96 62 



209 45 



S cts. 

159 89 

46 96 

5 29 

4s 28 

16 77 

3 S5 

2 55 



S cts. 

Ill) 73 

42 50 

7 37 
29 26 

8 57 
7 <is 
1 33 



283 59 

11 39 



272 2ii 



237 74 
9 59 



22s 1.-, 



S cts. 



17s 


2'.' 


56 


12 


9 


97 


48 


(17 


15 


96 


69 


i i 


4 


79 


382 


-7 


26 


00 






S cts. 



196 


77 


57 


13 


o 


li. 


46 


93 


37 


29 


80 


95 


1 


S3 


426 


06 


14 


62 



411 44 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NET OUTLAY PER CAPITA FOR PAST SIX YEARS. 



Penitentiary. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904 


1905 




233 84 

227 73 
236 51 
394 09 
440 40 


% cts. 

252 11 
234 90 
247 69 
474 95 
442 til 


t ;.- 

307 97 
290 92 

263 56 
452 47 
418 45 


S cts. 

240 07 
335 06 
269 9S 
377 64 
508 69 


S cts. 

L86 15 

288 'is 
231 97 
347 56 
462 49 


1 




272 20 




228 15 




350 97 




411 44 







COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NET OUTLAY FOR PAST SEX YEARS. 



Penitentiary. 



1S99-00 , 1900-1. 



1901-2. 



1902-3. 



1903-4. 



Average dail 



S cts. 



$ cts. 






S cts. 



1904-5. 



S .ts. 



ton 

i nt de Paul 97,763 91 

Dorchester : . . 51,714 22 

Manitoba 44,341 7s 

British Columbia 38,763 00 



116,569 48 157,681 72 89,228 92 151 100,090 54 



105,858 34 114.431 19 106.934 65 98,99 

51,450 65 51,861 69 55,430 56 55,617 85 

47.1152 94 IT.nt, 1 75 I 1,401 st 51 8 

40,557 us 10,635 13 45,114 57 42,636 57 



5 94 
36 17 

t8,475 62 



349,152 39 402,53* 63 343,218 68 109,434 64 349,166 58 373,771 



1,430 



1.405 



1 ,29 l 



1 ,224 



1 ,286 



1,359 



REPORT OF INSPECTORS OF PENITENTIARIES 

SESSIONAL PAFER No. 34 

Actual Cost — 

Value of supplies on hand, July 1, 1904 $141,952 

Grdss expenditure, 1904-05 429,537 

£571 4S9 
Deduct — 

Supplies on hand June 30, 1904 $161,011 

Approximate value of prison labour employed in 

production of revenue and capital 75,000 

236,611 

Net actual cost 334,878 

Cost per caput 

Cost per caput, per diem 0.67 



SUMMARY. 



iv 



1900-1 . 



1901-2. 



1902-3. 



1903-4. 



1904-5. 



Gross expenditure 

Net expenditure 

Actual cost 

Cost per caput 

Cost per caput, per diem. 



% cts. 






% cts. 



S cts. 



S cts. 



09 17 433.927 88 417,355 21 450,859 02 422,661 00 429,537 63 



348,152 39 402,5 

355,486 00 329,980 00 

24s .59 234 86 

68 64 



343,218 68 409,434 r,4 349.166 00 373,770 82 

394.970 00 333,300 00 327.217 00 334,878 00 

30.1 23 272 30 254 44 246 41 

75 69 67 



PRISON LABOUR. 

In several of the penitentiaries there is not adequate labour available, and the 
question of providing additional work i.s therefore urgent. The suggestion that 
prison labour must not come in competition with free labour is self-evident absurdity. 
So long as our laws require that hard labour shall be a portion of each penalty it must 
necessarily follow that the work performed in compliance with the sentence will dis- 
place that amount of free labour. The work involved in cooking, cleaning, repairing 
and in the construction of buildings within the prison walls could all be done by free 
labour, and, therefore, every day's work performed by a convict displaces labour that 
would otherwise be available to ordinary labourers. The sentence of the court and the 
statute upon which it is based impose labour upon a convict, and it becomes the im- 
perative duty of the government to furnish facilities for carrying out the sentence. 
That convicts must labour is imperative and that such labour will displace that of free 
citizens is unavoidable. These are matters of obligation and not merely questions of 
policy. It may not be desirable to employ prison labour in the manufacture of articles 
that will compete with the production of free labour in the open markets of commerce, 
but in order to avoid doing so it is necessary that the government should, so far as 
possible, utilize the labour of its wards in supplying its own requirements. It is not 



B 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

unreasonable to expect that the government will utilize the labour of its wards in 
supplying its own wants, especially when the labour is imposed by statutory obligation. 

In several of the neighbouring States legislation on these lines has been enacted 
with satisfactory results. 

The principle has been embodied in the constitution of the State of New York, 
and after several years' experience there is no complaint of injustice to any citizen. 

The following excerpts show the character of the legislation referred to : — 

' No person in any such prison, penitentiary, jail .or reformatory, shall be required 
or allowed to work, while under sentence thereto, at any trade, industry or occupation, 
wherein or whereby his work, or the product or profit of his work, shall be farmed out, 
contracted, given or sold to any person, firm, association or corporation. This section 
shall not be construed to prevent the legislature from providing that the convicts may 
work for, and that the products of their labour may be disposed of, or for or to any 
public institution owned or managed and controlled by the state, or any political 
division thereof; * * * * * in productive industries for the benefit of the state, or the 
political divisions thereof, which shall be under rules and regulations for the distribu- 
tion and diversification thereof, to be established by the State Commission of Prisons. 

' Articles so manufactured shall not be purchased from any other source, for the 
state or public institutions of the state, or the political divisions thereof, unless the 
State Commission of Prisons shall certify that the same cannot be furnished upon 
such requisition, and no claim therefor shall be audited or paid without such certificate.' 

The propriety of adopting similar legislation in Canada is respectfully submitted 
for your consideration. 

TERRITORIAL JAILS. 

REGI.VA JAIL. 





Average daily 

population. 


expenditure. 


( lost per capita 

per annum. 




1895 6 


22 ■"> 
21 5 
20 75 
1 5 7"> 
23 
20 
20 
17 S 

s 


s 

9,055 

8,151 

7,576 

7,722 

8,279 

8,633 

8,625 

1 1,061 

11,769 

1 1,492 




S 

41)'.' 


1896 7 


279 


1897-8. . 


375 


1898-9 


477 


lN'I'l (1 


:;7^ 


1900 1 . 


4. Yt 






1902 3 


7S9 


1903-4 


4"7 


1904-5 


334 



REPORT OF INSPECTORS OF PENITENTIARIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

PRINCE ALBERT JAIL. 



Average daily 
population. 



Gross 
Expenditure. 



Cost per capita 
per annum. 



1898-9 
1899-0 

L! 1 

190] 2 
1902-3 

1903 4 

1904 ."■ 



3 


5,587 

6,000 
6 sv. 

: 156 

,1 ■ 


1 .635 


3.1 


1,216 


::::::: , e.s 


713 


6.4 


955 


6.3 


] 4 192 


14 


543 


21 


533 


1 





MATERIAL CONDITION. 

The buildings, machinery and equipment are maintained in good condition. New 
buildings are being erected where required. The reconstructed east wing of the King- 
ston penitentiary will be ready for occupation in a few months. It contains one 
hundred and fifty-two cells. At the St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary fair progress has 
been made with the new workshops. At the Dorchester penitentiary work has been 
continued on the second section of the workshops. A cut-stone reservoir, of one hun- 
dred and twenty thousand gallons capacity, has been erected near the springs from 
which the water supply of the penitentiary is drawn. It will be kept full, ready for 
instant use in case of fire. An extension of the cell wing at Manitoba penitentiary 
was begun last spring. It is designed to contain one hundred and twenty-eight cells. 
The new cell wing at the British Columbia penitentiary has been completed and is now 
occupied. Permanent workshops will be erected next, and then, it is hoped, the walls 
can be commenced. The cell wing at the Prince Albert jail has been enlarged by the 
erection of an addition containing twenty-eight cells and a work room. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DOUGLAS STEWART, 

G. W. DAWSON, 

Inspectors. 



Ottawa, December 6, 1905. 



10 DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



APPENDIX. 

Paper Prepared for the National Prison Congress, October 1905, by Douglas Stewart, 
Chairman of the Committee on Prison Discipline. 

Subject.— Prison Discipline; its objects and obstacles. 

The term discipline, as it applies to prisons, has been misunderstood by many of 
those engaged in its enforcement, by those subject to its operation and by the public 
generally. In speaking of strict discipline one is apt to conjure up ideas of punish- 
ment, restriction of liberty, unnatural restraint and other matters that have no con- 
nection with it or its object. Discipline is merely the enforcement of method — and 
method is merely the natural law of order. The methods adopted to enforce propriety 
of conduct in the household, in the school, in the church, in the workshop, in the 
counting house, in public institutions and in the army differ according as the require- 
ments demand; but method and order are necessary in all places and at all times, if 
chaos is to be avoided. If each individual were guided only by his own will 
and his individual ideas of right and wrong, his presence would become intolerable in 
any association of individuals. Respect for, and compliance with, constituted author- 
ity is the basis" of congregate existence. It begins in the home and is equally appli- 
cable to any position or condition of life in which one comes in contact with his fel- 
lowmen. 

The boy who disregards parental authority has laid the foundation of a criminal 
career, and it will be the accident of environment if he fails to become a criminal. 
He may never be convicted of crime, but his resentment of authority will, nevertheless, 
guide him in his contact with his fellows. 

The discipline of military bodies is necessarily more exacting than that of the 
family for the reason that greater, numbers have to be controlled in obedience to one 
authority and within restricted limits. The enforcement of discipline in the army 
prevents discord, ensures harmony of action, and enables intricate manoeuvres to be 
carried out without friction. It does not restrict real freedom. On the contrary, it 
enables the greatest freedom of really necessary action without friction. In the same 
way and for the same reason institutions composed of individuals, gathered from the 
various strata of society, of various degrees of intelligence, various temperament and 
diverse inclinations require to be placed under strict discipline until they shall have 
become habituated to method and order in their contact with their fellowmen. A lack 
of respect for authority has been, in most cases, the reason of their downfall, and the 
inculcation of the lacking principle is therefore the first essential in their uplifting. 
A just and rigid enforcement of authority, until the habit of prompt obedience shall 
have been acquired, is essential in laying the foundation of good citizenship. 

The obstacles to prison discipline are numerous, and it is necessary to call atten- 
tion to them, without prejudice, and with the assurance that no personal reference is 
intended. 

The first is, in many cases, the warden. He is frequently selected from some other 
profession or calling, has vague, theoretical ideas of criminal character and is with- 
out experience in the methods necessary for the control of the heterogeneous masses of 
which a penal institution is composed. He has never had his safe rifled, his house 
burned, or any member of his family dishonoured as the result of the caprice of 
human villany, and usually assumes that his wards are merely unfortunates who, under 
Btress of circumstances, have been led astray. He is apt to suppose that all previous 
difficulties in the administration of the prison were due to unreasonable rules and 



REPORT OF INSPECTORS OF PENITENTIARIES 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No 34 

restrictions, the object of, and necessity for. which do not yet occur to him. He is 
unwittingly a revolutionary. If a convict comes before him with a plausible requ 
he is ready to grant it, without thought of the difficulties which the precedent may 
create. It delights his heart to meet the seemingly harmless demands of his wards, 
and he congratulates himself on the ease with which an institution can be adminis- 
tered when new methods are adopted. It is only after a few months of experience that 
he realizes that every special privilege granted by him has been abused, that the abuse 
has been established by his authority and cannot be eliminated without admission of his 
previous incompetence. If he be superior to his own weakness, he will admit his error 
and by self stultification endeavour to bring back discipline to the point where he 
found it; but in doing so he is apt to incur the antagonism as well as the contempt of 
his wards. This has been the experience of many wardens. The exceptions but prove 
the rule. 

A second obstacle to discipline is the egotism of inexperienced guards. They 
are willing to concede the necessity of discipline for convicts, but regard the rules gov- 
ernng their own acts with disdain. They have a false conception of the object of the 
regulations, and they think thai they should be permitted to exercise their individual 
judgment without restraint or limitation. In familiar interviews with convicts, they 
are apt to express sympathy regarding ihe vexations restrictions imposi d by regulation, 
hoping thereby to gain the admiration of those whom they are expected to control and 
not to coddle. With, the experience of criminal character comes a reaction, and gen- 
erally an experienced guard is a strong advocate of rigid discipline-. It i- easier in his 
case to reverse his tactics than it is for a warden or other superior officer to do so. 
His direct contact with the convicts enables him to realize the reversal to be a neces- 
sity. No other course is open to him. The guard who firmly enforces discipline may 
evoke the resentment and the direful threats of convicts during their incarceration, but 
he is tin- officer of whom they speak with greatest respect after their release. 

Another obstacle is the journajjstic 'muck-rake' or fake reporter. In an attempt 
to fill space in his paper he interviews or rather 'pumps' dismissed and disgruntled 
subordinate-, and even publishes as facts the lurid statements of discharged convicts. 
The statements emanating from these sources are almost invariably without founda- 
tion, but they cause annoyance to the prison management and tend to demoralize dis- 
cipline. The irresponsibility of the sources of information and of the papers that 
descend to that depth of fake journalism render both immune from the provisions of 
the law. Fortunately but few journals all<>w their columns to be thus debased by pub- 
lishing as facts the fictions of known criminals. 

Another obstacle (which can more properly be termed a nuisance) is the visitor 
who is merely 'sight seeing.' It is difficult to appreciate the morbid curiosity that 
leads such persons to our prisons, and it is equally difficult to convince them of the 
demoralizing effect of their interference with the routine of the institution, or ol the 
fact that criminals pre not caged for exhibition purposes. 

Still'another obstacle requires notice, namely, The self-appointed evangelist. In 
this case the difficulty is rendered more acute because the motive-- cannot be impugned. 

In his opinion he confers a favour on the institution. He is always g 1. but seldom 

reasonable. He usually arrives unannounced and claims the right to proclaim his 
evangel without reference to industrial or disciplinary necessities. Why should con- 
victs be deprived of his eloquence by such sordid reasons as the making . brooms 
and binder twine' The convicts desire to hear him. Of course they do, although for 
the same reason they would prefer ; i minstrel troupe. Anything to relieve the monotony 
of the prison routine. 

The lady evangelist, lady visitor and tract distributor are philanthropists, also, who 

do not realize the fact that their visits are no1 conducive to g I discipline. They 

seem to be under Ihe delusion thai the moral needs of prisoners are absolutely 
neglected, and thai no provision is made for their physical comfort. In some of the 
hovels which they passed on their way to the prison could have been found the wi 



12 DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

and children of the prisoners whom they have come to visit. The wives struggling 
\t ith toil and temptation in order that the home may be kept intact and inviolate pend- 
ing the return of the wretch who disgraced it. The ration which he receives daily, at 
public expense, would be considered a feast by his wife and family. If our visitors 

a convict in the scanty rags that his family are obliged to wear, or supplied with 
such food as they are compelled to subsist on, the country would ring with denuncia- 
tions, and the spirits of humanity and civilization would be invoked to join in the 
general chorus of indignation. It is not necessary that the sunshine of the philan- 
thropist's presence should be securely bottled and labelled ' for criminals only.' It is 
useless to ask them to confine their attention to the female ward. That would not afford 
the sphere of influence that their ambition aspires to. It is useless to explain that the 
te has already provided a chaplain whose sole duty is to look after the spiritual needs 
of the prisoners — that he understands criminal character and has made a special study 
of the methods of instruction likely to be most effective — that the state has also pro- 
vided a specially selected and ample library with a view to interest, instruct and reform 
the inmates. It is equally of no avail to point out that in order to afford them the 
privilege of interviewing the convicts it will be necessary to stop the industrial works 
I derange the daily routine of discipline. The warden has either to grant the request 
or incur the future antagonism of sincerely good but misguided philanthropists. If the 
' glad hand ' had been extended to the men before their hands were soiled by crime or 
adorned with hand-cuffs the benefits would have been tenfold greater. 

The obstacles are numerous but the list would be incomplete without reference 
to the ' professional prison reformer.' He is not to be confused with the genuine 
reformer who. before suggesting changes, makes a thorough investigation of dis- 
ciplinary requirements and judiciously presses his opinions upon those entrusted with 

prison management. His methods are too slow for the ' professional reformer,' 
who deems it his duty to agitate, in and out of season, in the press and on the platform, 
for the abolition of everything that in his alleged mind degrades the abnormally acute 
self-respect of the convicts. 

He objects to the lock-step by which convicts are kept in proper control when 

marching to and from their work. The system by which men are compelled to keep 

step is all right when applied to our soldiers, but by some unknown law it becomes 

I rading to super-sensitive moral degenerates. The ' go as you please ' system that 

enables the convict to escape the eye and control of the officer shoidd be adopted. The 

professional reformer urges it because the convict prefers it. The convicts prefer it 

because it affords them bettor opportunities for evading surveillance. The cadets at 

■ military colleges are trained in the lock-step as an illustration of the most com- 

t form of congregate movement. The reformer who would dare to intimate to the 

hat the exercise is degrading would be wiser before his initiation w-as completed. 

The reformer objects to a distinctive dress. It is true that our athletic clubs adopt 
variegated costumes, some of which are similar to the convict garb. In their simplicity 
the boys do not realize that this will sap them of their self-respect and their manhood. 
They are not aware that the researches of professional reformers has resulted in the 
discovery that dia dress is degrading — that it sterilizes self-respect and anni- 

hilates manhood. If the reformers will but for a season turn their attention to the 
enlightenment of the athletic clubs, the results will be beneficial — to the prisons. The 
military o- semi-military dress is supposed to ennoble the convict and build up bis 
moral tissue; but how about the gallant soldier who is compelled to 6gh1 our battles in 
convict garb? Is he supposed to be devoid of feelings and sentiment : Hoes the adop- 
tion of similar dress ennoble the convict or merely degrade the soldier I l^et reformers 
explain. 

The professional reformer also imagines that convicts, like Samson, it' shorn of 
their locks are shorn of their manhood. He boasts of his descent from the 'croppies' 
of old England who purchased the freedom of their country with their blood. He in- 
sists, however, that such a reasonable and general sanitary precaution as hair clipping 



REPORT OF INSPECTORS OF PENITENTIARIES 13 

SESSIONAL FAPER No. 34 

in public institutions is degrading. If it be degrading because it is obligatory, the 
laws of our land are degrading, for the same reason. 

The manhood and self respect of the convict received a jar when he committed 
the crime. It was sorely strained when he was marched to the police cells under public 
gaze. It must have received a serious twist when sentence was pronounced in open 
court, and the continuous click of the lock that deprives him of liberty would 
seem to be the ' last straw.' With those more important incidents occupying his mind, 
it is hardly reasonable to suppose that the length of his hair, the colour of his dress, or 
the enforcement of a uniform and regular step is likely to disturb his dreams or incite 
him to further villany. The average criminal is neither a child nor an imbecile, and 
those who would treat him as such arc liable to experience a rude awakening. 

The pre-requisites of good discipline arc: — 

i 1 ! A concise and ' clean cut ' code of regulations, in which the duties of officers 
and the rights of convicts are clearly defined. 

(2) A warden who has the intelligence, to appreciate the necessity of enforcing 
his authority through and by the regulations, and not otherwise. The regulations are 
to the warden what the statutory laws are to he judge on the bench. He may question 
their wisdom, but he has no right to waive their provisions or ignore their existence. 

(3) A staff of officers, every one of whom has been approved by the warden before 
appointment. An officer who is appointed independently of the warden is a perpetual 
menace to discipline. He naturally supposes that if he can obtain his position with- 
out the warden's approval, he can retain it notwithstanding the warden's disapproval, 
and he governs his actions accordingly. The previous approval of the warden insures 
loyalty and esprit de corps, and centralizes the responsibility of the management in 
the head of the institution, who can then be held responsible for results. 

(4) Cells and workshops that are sanitary and comfortable at all seasons. The 
irritability resulting from bad sanitary conditions has brought many a convict to the 
warden's court. The sleeplessness caused by bad ventilation has caused many a plot to 
be planned and subsequently executed. Fresh air is the God-given right of every 
being that breathes. 

(5) Dietary of wholesome, well-cooked and cleanly served food. The animal bulks 
largely in the composition of the criminal, and his temper is more liable to le aroused 
by improper food than by defective rhetoric in a sermon. He has a keener apprecia- 
tion of the defective point. 

In the maintenance of discipline the following points are essential: — 

(a) Respect for authority.— Convicts who are not taught to approach and address 
their officers in a respectful manner cannot be expected to respect or obey them. 
' Familiarity breeds contempt,' anil many an officer has earned and obtained the con- 
tempt of convicts by his own contempt for what he deems 'useless formality.' Dis- 
cipline consists of details. Where the details are omitted, discipline does not exist. 

(b) Prompt and implicit obedience. — The officer who invites or permits a discus- 
sion of his order by a convict, is not fit to control convicts. If the convict rightly or 
wrongly imagines that the order is improper or unreasonable he can, subsequently, lay 
his grievance before the superior officers; bu1 when an order is given it must be obeyed 
promptly. The institution is a prison, not a debating club. 

(c) The avoidance by officers of an irritating manner. — Convicts are not infre- 
quently incited to insubordination by the manner in which an order is given. Officers 
should cultivate a quiet, firm and self-restrained demeanour. Self-restraint on the part 
of the officer induces self-restraint on the part of the convict. Harsh and boisterous 
commands produce irritation and resentment. The officer who coddles and *li> • fCv er 
who cudgels are ,:like incompetent. 



14 DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

(d) Neatness, cleanliness and thrift should be encouraged. — In view of the ante- 
cedents and previous environment of the average convict, it is of special importance 
that he should be trained and encouraged in habits of neatness in his dress, his cell and 
his workroom. Personal cleanliness should be rigidly enforced. Habits of waste as 
to clothing, food or working materials should be strictly checked, and the value of 
property inculcated as an essential to future success in life. Discipline on these points 
will do more to foster self-respect and real manhood than a thousand maudlin expres- 
sions of sympathy unaccompanied by the practical enforcement of the elementary 
principles of civilized life. 

(e) Realization of their immortality. — While disciplinary officers have no official 
responsibility as spiritual guides, it must be remembered that their official obligations 
do not deprive them of the right to impress upon their wards the fact that each pos- 
sesses an immortal soul that is not confined by prison bars and is not fettered by 
statute obligations or prison regulations. If they be taught to realize that the really 
important element of their being is free and untrammelled, the questions of prison 
regulations and discipline are relieved of much of the terror that usually attaches to 
them. 

Prison discipline, by the inculcation of method, order and civilized habits of life, 
lays the foundation of real manhood, and those entrusted with its enforcement should 
realize that, day by day, they are laying foundation stones upon which, in the future, 
human lives and immortal souls will depend for support. 



.5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX A. 



DOMINION PAROLE OFFICERS REPORT. 



L5 



5-6 EDWARD V|l. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



A. 1906 



Hon. Charles Fitzpatrick, K.C., 

Minister of Justice. 

Sir, — I beg to submit my report on the parole system for the fiscal year ended 
June 30. 1905. On May 1, 1905, I assumed the active duties of the Dominion Parole 
Officer. Previously I had rendered the government voluntary service as an officer of 
the Salvation Army, in connection with the Prison Gate movement. On my appoint- 
ment as Dominion Parole Officer and consequent withdrawal from the staff of the 
Salvation Army and the oversight of the Prison Gate movement, Lt.-Col. Pugmire was 
appointed to take up this special branch of work. I have reason to believe that many 
of the convicts discharged from our penitentiaries will find in him a true friend, who 
will, when necessary, administer to the\r temporal needs, as well as render them good 
advice in the struggle to rehabilitate themselves on their discharge from our prisons. 

Since my appointment as parole officer I have had the hearty co-operation of all 
the societies engaged in the uplifting of the criminal population of our Canadian 
penal institutions. The work accomplished and the small expenditure in connection 
with extending' a practical helping hand when needed to the paroled or discharged 
convict, in my opinion, warrant the government in continuing its efforts for the re- 
habilitation of those released from our penal institutions. 

The following statement of results has been compiled from figures obtained from 
the Commissioner of Dominion Police, and I submit it for your consideration : — 



Convicts paroled. 


1899-O.l 


1900-1 . 


1901-2. 


1902-3. 


1903-4. 


1904-5. 


Total. 




71 
1 


122 
53 


157 
89 


113 
65 


122 
67 


127 
95 


712 


" prisons', jails and reforma- 
tories 


370 


Total 


72 


175 


246 


178 


189 


222 


1,082 


Licensee cancelled for non-com- 
pliance with conditions 

Licenses forfeited by subsequent 
convictions 

Sentences completed on parole . . . 

Sentences not yet terminated . . . 


5 

7 
59 

1 


9 

8 

141 

17 


19 

6 

189 

32 


11 

2 
124 

41 


16 

96 

77 


16 

1 

48 

157 


76 

24 
657 
325 


I otal 


72 


175 


246 


178 


189 


222 


1,082 





Tlie wisdom of the parole system, and the discretion exercised in its admin 
can be judged by results. From the adoption of the system in 1899 until the close of 
the last fiscal year there were 1,082 paroles granted. Of this number of prisoners 
paroled 657, or about sixty-one per cent, have completed their sentences, under 
without violation of the conditions imposed: while 325, or thirty per cent, additioi 
have thus far respected the conditions of their licenses which are still operative. Those 
who have forfeited their licenses by subsequent conviction, and who may be thought 
to represent the criminal element of those under license, number 24, or but a lit 
over two per cent. The remaining seven per cent have been re-committed for non- 
compliance with the conditions of thi bul without charge of criminality agai 
them during the period they were at large. 

It cost the state $254 per capita for the maintenance of convicts of our peniten- 
tiaries during the past year. The 222 men released on parole this past year. 

34—2 17 



18 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

proved themselves satisfactory cases, have turned producers. The state has not only 
been relieved of the cost of their keeping in the penitentiary, but these men working out- 
side at labourers' wages ($1.50 per day) produce in the year over one hundred thousand 
dollars to the support of their families and themselves. I know many of these men 
who are earning three or four dollars per day, having good positions as capable 
mechanics, &c, in various cities of the Dominion. 

During the year I have twice visited the penitentiaries and jails in the west, in- 
terviewing the major portion of the men and seeking employment for the paroled and 
discharged prisoners. 

Dorchester, N.B., and St. Vincent de Paul have had four visits during the year. 
To Kingston seven visits have been made in the interests of the men and the working 
cut of the parole system. 

A number of patrons have been secured in the cities and towns of the Dominion, 
who are, on my recommendation, prepared to give employment to the paroled or dis- 
charged convicts. We have provided a number with transportation, when such assist- 
ance has been deemed advantageous, and have otherwise assisted specially deserving 
oi needy cases. At the request of their parents, five wayward boys were located in the 
penitentiaries, in which they had been incarcerated unknown to their parents, and 
were returned to them on their discharge. Several cases of reconciliation between 
husbands and their wives and families have also been made, and, where homes have 
been broken up through the criminality of the parents, these homes have been restored 
and their children when in the custody of charitable societies or friends, have been 
returned to their parents. 

During the year I have been able to find employment for 286 men on their dis- 
charge from the federal institutions, apart from the paroled convicts. 

The fundamental principle of the parole law is reconstruction; everything else 
connected with its operation is subsidiary matter. Society will always cry, ' punish 
the evil doer.' The parole system answers, ' let us fit him for citizenship.' 

If a man has been in prison for a term of five years, more or less, it is a moment- 
ous instant for him when the guard slips the bolt and he steps out a free man. But if 
this man was a criminal five minutes before he was discharged from prison, so he is, 
in principle, five minutes after ; moving the bolt only re-shapes his circumstances 
without doing anything to change the man. Change of circumstances is no index of 
change of character. Constructive work in connection with the parole system has first 
of all to be put into the personality of the man before he leaves the prison; then there 
must be the effort on his part to reform and a determination to do better, before the 
system can help him. 

In the operation of the parole system we get to know the man from every stand- 
point before a movement is made to help him. Then a patron is sought out who will 
give the man employment and also take a Special i ! t and en- 

courage him in his endeavour to be law-abiding. Through industry and the new found 
social environments a delinquent is made to feel the possibility of his regaining a 
social status and becoming a good citizen. Should he relapse into Ins old ways of living, 
the license is revoked and the man is returned to prison. 

All new systems need perfecting, and in the future there may be intricate ques- 
tions to solve in connection with the parole system; in its operation we eann.'t push 
to a solution in advance of the present situation, any more than blossoms can be 
discovered on trees until they come out as evolution from the tree's inward life. 

From the results of this movement I am confident all complex questions will settle 
■ Ives if we keep faithfully at work on the general principles now operating the 

Q. 

T would respectfully refer to the facl thai sine, the inception of the system, six 

years ago, little over two per cent of the entire number of men have been returned to 

oitentiaries convioted of crimes committed while on parole. This fact refleets 

great credit on the authorities whose duty it is to consider the applications Eor parol.-. 



PAROLE OFFICERS REPORT 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

If such results can be accomplished from the initial operation of this law, may we not 
hope for and expect still greater results with the increased knowledge and experience 
of its operation? 

We are safe in assuming this movement to be now past the experimental stage. 
While a single case may be cited occasionally by the press, or those critically inclined, 
let me point out that delinquent cases are most exceptional, and, from the tabulated 
statement of the Commissioner of Police, the record shows a number of men, having 
earned their full liberty through the parole system, and now law-abiding citizens. 

The best system for the elimination of crime is prevention. For if the cure is the 
voice of the past, and to suppress is the command of temporary physical force, to 
prevent must be the divine whisper of spiritual power. Prevention did not begin soon 
enough to entirely prevent crime. To prevent crime, as in preventing ill health, we 
should begin at least a century before the criminal is born. We are just beginning to 
approach an ideal by insisting upon better homes for the poor and vicious; by child- 
placing in well selected homes; and by the provisions of the juvenile court. While 
even these excellent agencies cannot affect those whose early life is not touched by 
their beneficent influence, yet preventive measures may be applied to them at any 
point of their progress downward, and keep them from drifting farther. 

My experience of years has proven that many young men, especially first offenders, 
bave, by the parole system, been kept from drifting into confirmed criminality. To 
furnish better opportunities for all young men, before, during and after imprisonment 
for crime, is our practical object. 

Some little comment has been made in connection with the administrative opera- 
tion of the Canadian parole system in comparison with the parole laws of the United 
States and elsewhere, emanating from sources not in touch with the results given from 
the States where the parole system is in vogue. In looking up the different reports 
let me give you the tabulated statements of two of the leading institutions showing 
the best percentage of work accomplished under the American system. 

The records of the state prison at Michigan City show from April 1, 1897, to 
April 1, 1904, 909 men released on parole. Twenty per cent proved delinquent, and of 
this number 99 were returned to prison for crimes committed while on parole. Of 69 
the maximum of the term for which they were sentenced expired while they were on 
parole, and they received their discharge; 491 earned their discharge by good conduct 
while on parole, 17 died, and 148 continue to make the reports required by the 
authorities. 

From the Indiana Reformatory, of the same dates, 1.011 men were released on 
parole, and of thesr 847 have been discharged after having made satisfactory reports 
for such time as was required. Of the whole number paroled, 348, or about 23-5 per 
cent, failed to comply with the conditions. The majority of these having committed 
offences were returned to the institution. Of 144 the maximum sentence expired and 
they received their discharge. One was pardoned by the governor, 36 died, and 172 
continued to make their reports. 

The amount of wages earned by the paroled men of both institutions is estimated 
at $587,711. 

In conclusion let me quote an argument of Dr. Wines in one of his late essays 
on the 'New Criminology': — 

' It is strange that the disbelief in the possibility of amendment on the pat 
the criminal should be so deepseated and universal. Men and women equally puilty 
before law. human and divine, but who have not bei n exposed to the eo 
and shame of prison life, have abandoned their evil courses in response to influences 
exerted upon them in free life. 'I here have been many signal instances of trans- 
formation of character and conduct occurring in i>risnn. It would be foolish to esti- 
mate the exact percentage of corrigible and incorrigible convicts, or to shut our eyes 
to the persistence of the criminal type of character, or to expect from the average 

34r-2J 



20 DEPA.Rliir.yi OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

prisoner anything more than that he shall cease to be a lawbreaker and become a law- 
abiding citizen. Religion encourages this hope. So does science, as I shall now pro- 
ceed to show. 

' The methods and achievements of science have profoundly modified metaphysical 
thought, so that a new word, psycho-physics, has been admitted to the dictionary. In 
the physchovphysical study < if human nature, there is a constant recognition of the vital 
relations between mental experiences 'in the operations of the brain and of the nerv. - 
system in man, of their inierdependence and reciprocal relations and influence. The 
researches of physiologists have shed light on much that was formerly obscure in the 
anatomical structure and functions of the body. We have learned that every mental 
impression and perception, every act of memory, of the imagination, of the ju Igment, 
of the will, every passing thought or emotion, is accomplished in this life, the only life 
of which we have experimental knowledge, by molecular changes in nerve tissue, by 
nervous activity and emotion. The paths followed in the accumulation and discharge 
of nerve force have been partially traced. By the aid of vivisection, scientific proof of 
their existence has been secured, and the functional utility of certain tracts of the 
brain has been demonstrated, enabling us to localize, to a limited extent, cerebri 
and to inspire the hope that further prosecution of the investigations now in progress 
may dispel some portion at least, of the mystery which enshrouds our present dual 
existence. The correspondence between the ord r of succession of nervous phen- mena 
and the phenomena of thought, feeling and volition, and the fact that certain of them 
are demonstrably simultaneous, have given definiteness and precision to met pi ysical 
speculation with reference to purely mental operations, if such there are : and they 
have given us an intelligible theory of the formation of habits, which, physio'ogically 
speaking, are neither more nor reflex nervous discharges rendered 

by their repeated occurrence, until the paths worn in the brain have become, so to s 
broad and smooth. The current of nervous energy accordingly takes the line of le -t 
stance. This parallelism exr - -ness enables us to follow it. and 

no doubt it is still deeper and more far-reachiug. It partially explains, perhaps, the 
well-known and familiar fact that bodily states, experiences and habits affect the mind, 
while mental states, experiences and habits equally affect the body. 

' It will not answer, therefore, to contend that because criminals in the care and 
custody of an unskilled warden, with untrained and incompetent subordinates, have 
i ;■' - ed, the same individuals might not have I rm id if they had 

been subjected to treatment at the hands of an expert. Expert treatment is the ideal 
of the new criminology. The new criminology aims at nothing Less than the suppres- 
sion of evil habits and replacing them by their opposites; in other words, the wearing 
of paths in the brain which shall offer less resistance than the old, familiar paths; the 
creation of new habits of thought, speech and action, with or without the consent of 
the convict himself. This k of tremi ifficulty. It is a revolution by 

in the i'i> • the word ; tin 

tion of all the prisoner's faculties, physical, mental and moral, on a well-consid< r 
mded plai lifferenl lated to m 

the conditions and net h individual case. Kindness must be blended with 

i . pon and enforced, and ah 

all the good will and • >very. Difficult 

but time al for it.- Lshment. 

How long nee. Hence the 

necessity So surer method can 

r, than to.maki 
atii" own submission and exertions. The tendency of the indeter- 

rnini ■ of the prison. The convict, when his 

i . comes to it as the 

aboil, of bop • do ''''■ Sooner ir later, he recognizes in the warden a friend. 



PAROLE OFFICER'S REPORT 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

whose strongest wish is to lift him out of the degradation into which he has fallen. 
When lie begins to perceive that it is himself who made war upon society and that 
society is not his enemy, as he had blindly imagined, the reformation is begun. When 
he learns the meaning and intention of the law, and becomes reconciled to it, like a 
wild animal tamed, his reformation is achieved. Affirmatively, therefore, as well as ne- 
gatively, the indeterminate sentence is shown to have a rational basis. The indeter- 
minate sentence and a reformatory discipline pre- !f ch the other as its essential 
complement. The maintenance of any reformatory system of treatment which shall 
prove in the highest degree effective, without the aid of the indeterminate sentence, is 
impossible. The imposition of an indeterminate sentence to a prison in which skilful 
and curative treatment is not supplied, is a judicial wrong. 

"Let no one think that thi - tions are the language of a sentimentalist or a 

visionary. Their truth has been verified by experience. If the American reformatory 
prisons have not yet fully met the reasonable expectations of their authors and 
supporters, this is because the new codes under which they are operated have been 
faultily drawn, or because the courts are not all of them in sympathy with the new 
legislation, or because the right men have not been assigned to the charge of these 
prisons, or because sufficient time has not yet been allowed for the realization of the 
higher and timer ideals set forth in this address. The positions taken, the views ad- 
vanc ssentially correct; and their general, if not universal, acceptance may he 

safely predicted, so soon as they are comprehended by that portion of the community 
which at all concerns itself with the prison question." 

In the ordinary affair- of life, men everywhere seek the causes which prod 
effects. Men are called into being, live their lives and pass away in obedience to natu- 
ral laws which are as immutable as the movement of the tid s. In the evolution of 
prison administration the defect of the born cripple, the idiot, the insane, is no longer 
charged to the poor victim who, unhampered by the world, still has a burden as heavy 
.as should be given any mortal man to bear. It is not very long ago that a wo 
about as intelligent as our own believed that disease, deformity and crime came from 
the same cause — some sort of an evil spirit or genius that found his abode in man. 
Tli. way t<> destroy the evil spirit was to destroy the man. But systems have under- 
gone a tremendous change. We surely advance in our methods as science and religion 
shed their light on a fallen humanity. It is gratifying to know that the needs of the 
unfortunate and erring of our fair Dominion are being met in a most practical and 
helpful way. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. P. ARCHIBALD, 

Dominion Parole Officer. 
Dominion Parole Offi< l. 

Ottawa. September Jo. 1905. 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX B. 



WARDENS' REPORTS. 



23 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



Kingston, November 1, 1905. 
To the Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sms, — I have the honour to present my seventh annual report (with appendices), 
and to transmit statistical tables and returns from the various departments of the 
Kingston Penitentiary for the year 1904-05. 

The total appropriation granted was $177,600. Of this amount there was 
expended $14.6,447.50, leaving a balance unexpended of $31,152.50. 

Briefly stated, the expenditure under the various heads was as follows : — 

Staff, including salaries, r< tiring allowances, uniforms 

and mess $66,093 33 

Maintenance of convicts (food, clothing and medicine) . 17,987 19 

D .-charge expenses (.freedom ?uits and allowances, 

transfers to other prisons and interments) 2.>00 80 

Working expenses: heat, light, water, maintenance of 
buildings and machinery, chapels, school, library 
and office expenses 13,460 14 

Industrie- : farm, trade shops, binder twine 36,070 I 8 

Prison equipment: machinery, utensils, furnishings and 

vehicles, lands, buildings and walls 8,493 86 

Miscellaneous: advertising and travel 1,542 in 

Total $146,447 50 



The total expenditure for the year was less than the total expenditure for 1903-04 
by $17,563.98. Accounts amounting to $21,184 were contracted toward the close of the 
year, which amount has been paid from current year's appropriation. Our total 
revenue amounted to $42,800. Net expenditure for the fiscal year, $103,047.50. Net 
cost per c ipita. $209.45. 

Population and movements. — We began the year with 44S convicts and closed with 
exactly the same number. Released during the year, 139: by expiration of sentence, 
86 ; by pardon, 15 ; ticket of leave, 29 ; death, 6 ; transfer to other prisons, 1 ; transfer 
to insane asylums, 2; total, 139. Eeceived during the year, from jails. 134: from 
other penitentiaries, 5; total, 139. Average daily population, 443. 

Female convicts. — -I desire to direct your attention to the fact that, at the close 
of the year covered by this report, we had but 7 female convicts in charge. The gradual 
but persistent annual decrease in this class of prison population is ominous and points 
to a time, in the near future, when the question of further maintenance, of a full 
penitentiary establishment for female convicts will demand consideration. On June 
30, 1897, we had 28 female convicts ; June 30, 1898, we had 26 ; June 30, 1899, we had 
19 ; June 30, 1900, we had 11 ; June 30, 1901, we had 15 ; June 30, 1902, 15 ; June 
80, 1903, 13; June 30, 1904, 11; June 30, 1905, 7. And, it is well to note, this includes 
the entire female penitentiary population for Quebec, Ontario. Manitoba, the Terri- 
tories, and British Columbia! For this little family of delinquents we. at Kingston 
penitentiary, are keeping up a prison establishment of 32 cells, with matron and assist- 
ant matron, kitchen, work-rooms, wash-rooms, &c, &c. — an establishment built for the 

25 



26 DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

accommodation of 40 convicts. Infinitely better and much cheaper to separate the 
remnant of this once formidable colony from the penitentiary. Unoccupied cells in 
this department are useless as they are so situated that they cannot be used for male 

convicts. 

Discipline. — The number of reports and punishments for the year is exceptionally 
large, but a majority of such reports were for trivial offences for which convicts were 
simply admonished or deprived of a few days' remission. The increase in number of 
reports is due to a continued persistent effort on the part of the officials to reduce to a 
minimum the use of tobacco and other contraband articles. These efforts, though not 
eminently successful so far as tobacco is concerned, have resulted in a much better 
state of discipline generally. No other of the latter day restrictions is so keenly felt 
and so fiercely resented by convicts as the deprivation of tobacco. Despite our utmost 
vigilance tobacco is still here, in less quantity than formerly, but the lessening of the 
supply seems to increase the demand and intensify the craze for it. We can, and do, 
restrict its use, but we cannot eliminate it. 

In November last a desperate attempt to escape was made by four convicts who 
overpowered the guards, secured their arms and made off at rapid pace across the 
fields. They were soon overtaken by officers of the prison and returned to custody. 
The convicts were taken out for trial for the offence, convicted and all four sentenced 
to 2i years additional servitude in the penitentiary. In the pursuit and capture of the 
fugitive convicts the officers generally showed zeal and activity, but Mr. W. S. Hughes, 
accountant, and Mr. T. W. Bowie, storekeeper, are deserving of special mention. 

The farm. — Our last season's crop of hay, cereals, roots and vegetables fully met 
our expectations, being as large as any ever taken from the prison farm. Potatoes, 
which we consider of great importance, proved a failure. We had a fairly large acreage 
and the growth was all that could be desired, but, in common with other sections, here- 
abouts, we were visited by both early and late potato blight and lost, from rot, fully 
two-thirds of our crop. The same conditions have returned this season and the result 
is likely to be equally disastrous. With the heaviest of clay land to cultivate, a super- 
abundance of rain during the summer, and the prevalence of blight we cannot reason- 
ably expect to succeed with this important crop. Counting labour worth something, 
the potatoes we have grown during the last three seasons have cost us fully $1 per 
bushel. It is a question whether or not we should buy all the potatoes we require and 
use our land for some more profitable crop. 

Improvement of our land by tiling and ditch-draining will increase our chances 
of success in the future and furnish healthful and profitable employment. Last fall 
we hoped to be able to secure a stock of cattle for winter feeding, but delays in reach- 
ing a decision on the matter led us to abandon the project for the season. Our piggery ■ 
enterprise proved profitable, and by charging market prices for produce furnished the 
prison we are able to close the year with a balance on the right side of the ledger. 

The quarry. — The completion of stonework of our new cell wing has lessened tbe 
demand upon our quarry very perceptibly, still we have kept up the work of stripping, 
and are now prepared to take out such stones as may be required with comparative ease. 
Our quarry is still a valuable asset, but the question as to the propriety of continuing 
the industry the year round, is forcing itself upon us. The use of concrete is lessening 
the demand for dressed stones. Our requirements for the future will be very light 
unless we build another wing. The amount paid for supervision of quarry gang 
would pay for the cement and sand required to make concrete blocks. These blocks 
can lie made inside the walls and police supervision made easier. I think the matter 
worthy of serious consideration. 

Industries generally. — Our blacksmiths and machinists have fair prospects for 
future employment. The completion of barriers for our new wing and the large orders 



WARDENS' REPORTS 27 

SESSIONAl PAPER No. 34 

for similar work from western prisons in course of construction will serve to keep them 
tusy for some time to come. The mason gang also have plenty of work before them. 
They will be busy at new wing till next spring. Then the south wing windows are to 
be changed. After that we will, of necessity, have to repair and point all the prison 
walls, which work will keep them employed for a year. Our plumbers and pipe gang 
are never out of work. For the carpenters, shoemakers and tailors there is not much 
in prospect, but they need not fear enforced idleness for some months at least. 

New cell wing. — This structure containing 152 cells is approaching completion 
and will, in all probability, be occupied before next annual report reaches you. The 
cell block is completed except installation of fixtures and the plastering of a few cells. 
Windows have been changed, roof has been renewed and we expect the mason work to 
be completed early next spring. Blacksmiths are behind with cell barriers on account 
of the large orders for similar work for western prisons. When this cell-wing is com- 
pleted and occupied, the prison of isolation will be empty — except the part occupied 
by penal class convicts — unless our general prison population increases. How. best to 
utilize the parts of that fine building soon to be vacant, will require consideration. 
Shall our insane patients be moved thither? Shall boy-convicts under 20 years of age 
be placed there, so as to keep them, as much as possible, from contact with older 
criminals '. Or, shall the entire structure be so changed as to make it a prison of 
isolation in reality? 

Binder-twine. — The binder-twine season begins about May 1, and terminates about 
October 1. There has been no change in our method of disposing of the product of 
our factory : we still sell ' to farmers only,' terms ' cash with order.' We employ no 
agents. Those who send us ' club orders ' are the agents of the farmers for whom 
they act. 

In conclusion I desire to express my thanks to yourselves for prompt assistance 
and advice rendered upon every occasion of difficulty, and to the officers who have 
loyally assisted me in the performance of my arduous duties. 

Yours sincerely, 

J. M. PLATT, 

Warden. 



[Appendix to Warden's Report.] 

Kingston, June 30, 1905. 
Memorandum, for the Warden. 

I have the honour to submit the following- report on the building and other indus- 
;rial work for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. 

East wing. — The rebuilding of the cells in this wing has been the principal work 
performed during the year, and the work has progressed satisfactorily. Masons, black- 
smiths, carpenters and stonecutters have been fully employed. The division and back 
walls for 104 out of 152 cells were built with the bricks taken out of the old cells, the 
remainder (48 c -lis) were built with cement blocks in division walls, and cement con- 
crete for back walls. 

About 6,000 cement blocks 6-inch by 13-inch by 15-inch were made to complete 
the walls between cells. The floors of all cells were finished as the building progressed; 
the floors were made of 3-inch cinder concrete, reinforced with i xpanded metal and 



28 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

1 inch granite concrete on top. The extension of wing was completed and the roof put 
on and covered with galvanized iron early last fall. 

The small windows with flat iron barriers, were taken out, the stone work 
cul away and new jambs built up; this makes the wing lighted by 18 windows, 
each 28 feet long, protected by barriers made with lj-inch diameter iron for vertical 
bars and |-inch by 3-inch cross bars. The new frames and sashes will be completed 
and put in place before the cold weather sets in. I would suggest that the windows in 
the south wing be enlarged in like manner as soon as convenient. Compared with the 
cast and west wings, the south wing is very dark and gloomy and the old frames and 
sashes are in such a dilapidated condition that they will have to be renewed in the near 
future. 

Farm buildings. — The stone partition walls in basement of drive shed were taken 
down and the joists supported on beams and stone piers, mangers built for feeding 
cattle, and the building painted outside. A number of the pen floors of piggery were 
renewed or repaired. 

Protestant chapel. — The partition between chapel and schoolroom has been rebuilt 
and plastered. 

Dock. — About 150 feet of the dock was rebuilt during the winter; this completes 
the docks on the west boundary of the prison property. 

Boads. — Union street west from Palace street to the boundary of the prison pro- 
perty has been graded. 

Buildings. — The buildings generally have received necessary npirs. Barriers, 
frames and sashes of most of the buildings have been repainted. Temporary wood 
partitions were put up in some of the cells in prison of isolation building, and a por- 
tion of the tile floor of kitchen was removed and a cement floor laid. 

Fences. — The fences generally are in good repair. A few short sections still 
remain to be repaired or renewed. 

Prisons in the northwest. — Six cell door barriers have been made for Regina jail, 
42 polished steel barriers for Edmonton jail, 28 barriers and 9 wove wire beds for 
Prince Albert jail, and 116 wove wire beds for British Columbia penitentiary. 

Tailors and shoemakers have been employed in making uniforms, discharge and 
prison clothing, and clothing for the Indians in the Northwest. 

The usual repairs to buildings and equipment have kept the shops all employed 
during the year. 

E. J. BURNS, 

Chief Trade Instructor. 



WARDENS' REPORTS 29 

SESSIONAL P<aPER No. 34 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 

St. Vincent de Paul. July 1, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaric -s. 
Ottawa. 

Sms, — I have the honour to present you my second annual report, and at the sanv= 
time submit to you the different reports showing what has been accomplished at the 
St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary during the fiscal year 1904-1905. 

The population at the end of the fiscal year 1903-1904 was. 365 
Received during the year 136 

501 

Discharged by expiration of sentence -7 

pardon 18 

parole 3:: 

transfer '! 

death 2 

escape 1 

144 

Convicts remaining June 30, 1905 £57 

The expenditure for the fiscal year 1904-05 was $104,226. as follows : — 

Staff (salaries, retiring allowances, uniforms and mess) $ 58,S4n '■', 

Maintenance of convicts (rations, clothing and medi- 
cines) 14.414 84 ■ 

Discharge expense; (freed m suits, allowances, trans- 
fers anrl iii! I 81 

Working expenses (heat, light, water, maintenance of 
buildings, machinery, chapels, schools and libraiy 
and office expenses) 15,213 54 

Industries (farm and trade shops) 6,364 72 

Prison equipment (machinery, furnishing, prison uten- 
sils, vehicles, building and walls) 6.280 84 

Miscellaneous (advertising and travel) 1.053 52 

Total $104,226 on 



nds in f ntiary. — It is now some yeai work 

nienced for the im a ' of the ground in ' the peni 

the genera] work of the institution was low of its completion. The 

lling of the ground amo : considerable work, when one considers the - 

of the soil, which is in a great i dl ied of solid rock, renderii i 

difficult villi his well 

known ability, 11 difficulties in the grading which <\- 

: Length of 500 i'< i I by 75 feet. The whole of thi a now put down in 

ly laid out, offering the besl bowing up 

j< . We havi added, from the public road to thi is in 

two places, one giving acce^- to the penitentiary, and the other 
residence. On eai - there is a coping 2 feet wide. Vehicles havi 



30 DEPARTilEXT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

longer access, as formerly, over the penitentiary ground, so that it will be easy to keep 
up and preserve the lawn on the terrace. The work which has been done this summer 
affects only the western part of the facade of the penitentiary. Next year the eastern 
part will be finished in the same style. The work once finished, we will plant flowers 
in different places, in order to complete the ornamentation of the grounds. 

New buildings. — We are continuing, this summer, the work on the new cut stone 
building which is intended for different departments. This building measures 286 
feet by 39 feet. The blacksmiths, engineers, tinsmiths and stone breakers will be 
housed here. This building is the continuation of the stonecutters' shop which was 
finished in the autumn of 1904, making in all a building of 406 feet by 39 feet. It 
will be easy for us to give work in this building to 140 to 150 men in different depart- 
ments, with all the comfort desirable. 

There is a competent instructor in each shop, to direct the work and see that it is 
properly executed, and to instruct those convicts who desire to learn a trade. There 
are found in each department prisoners who are workmen of considerable competence. 
This renders instruction easier for those who want to learn, as it gives the instructors 
more time to devote to convicts who are mere apprentices. The instruction given is of 
great advantage to men who have to serve long sentences, and who have yet within 
them the love of work. 

Farm. — The instructor of the farm, Mr. Ed. Kenny, having on the advice of the 
surgeon of the institution, resigned on March 1, 1905, I have since that date taken 
charge of the farm, and the work has been carried out according to orders and under 
the surveillance of the chief keeper. This officer being a farmer of experience, the 
work has been done in a manner that leaves nothing to be desired. The weather being 
favourable I have reason to believe that, if nothing unforeseen occurs, the harvest of 
this year will be much more abundant than for past years, and that the products will 
be more than sufficient for the needs of the institution. If I take into consideration 
the great quantity of grain sown, as well as the quantity of vegetables planted, all in 
ground well prepared, I have no doubt about the result. 

The harvest of 1904 was not what it might have been. The appearance in the 
spring was satisfactory, but unfortunately the autumnal rains were such that we lost 
even on the field a great part of the harvest. It is for that cause we were obliged during 
the year to purchase considerably for the needs of the institution. 

Kitchen. — We have just replaced the copper boilers which have been used for 
cooking for from 25 to 30 years, and which had become so old and burnt that it was 
impossible to repair them. It was found necessary to replace them with steel plate 
boilers, one with a capacity of 160 gallons, and the three others of 100 gallons each. 
Each boiler has been covered in J-inch asbestos, in order to prevent heat radiation, and 
the asbestos has been covered with sheet brass, with bands above and below, making 
the whole perfectly solid. 

The kitchen has been painted anew, and leaves nothing now to be desired, either 
for comfort or cleanliness. 

Brickyard. — On account of the of officers, caused in part by resignation. 

and by reason of different outside works which we had to finish, and considering the 
number of bricks yet "ii hand, we have thought fit to only make a small quantity of 50 
to 60 thousand. This will suffice for the needs of the institution. The machinery. 
. and all apparatus necessary in the making of bricks being in perfect order and 
ready to go ahead at any time, the months of August and September will allow of us 
completing all that will be necessary for our needs for the present. 

New lodge.— We have just finished the last details of this building. The electric 
light has been installed and connections made with the heating apparatus. We are 



WARDENS' REP0R1 8 31 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

now ready to take possession of the new offices and stores, the whole perfectly finished, 
and offering plenty of space for its needs. In order to give access from the inside, it 
was necessary to do a considerable amount of excavation, to bring the yard to the same 
grade with the entrance of the gate. The ground excavated extends 100 feet by 40, 
almost all in solid rock, similar to all works effected inside the penitentiary. The 
whole, however, is not yet finished, although we have easy access to the stores. These 
improvements are of the highest importance for the general administration of the 
institution. 

Water works and electric light. — Tne pumps, engines and electric motors of the 
water system work admirably, and give entire satisfaction. Our electric light plant 
is also as perfect as possible, and gives the best of service. 

Quarry. — The work of excavating the yard leading to the north lodge having been 
done by the quarry gang, has been the cause of a certain amount of delay in the work- 
ing of the quarry. 

Work there has been resumed and will be actively pursued. I am of opinion that 
from now to the end of autumn, when we finish for the winter working at the quarry, 
we shall have sufficient stone in the penitentiary yard to furnish work to the stone- 
cutters during the entire winter. 

Engineers' and blacksmiths department. — During the year which has just ter- 
minated, beyond other considerable work done for the institution, we have done for the 
penitentiaries of Manitoba, British Columbia and Alberta 184 cell barrier doors, as 
well as necessary apparatus for locking. This work represents an amount of $8,000 to 
$10,000, which has been done during the year by the convicts working in these two 
departments. The total amount for all this work will be placed by the Department of 
.Justice to the credit of the institution, and will serve to lessen the expense of the ad- 
ministration generally. 

Goal shed. — Considering that the construction of the shop building will be 
minated during the course of the fall, I would suggest the erection of a coal shed near 
the siding. We receive every year over (2,000) two thousand tons of coal, which is 
placed in the yard of the penitentiary. Outside of the embarrassment and dirt of that 
deposit, it is a loss for the institution, according to the experience of an expert in this 
line, who informed me lately that coal looses as much as :> p r cent of its value by being 
exposed to an open temperature of wind and rain, instead of being protected by a 
shelter: and. on the quantity we receive, this percentage represents a considerable loss. 
1 have then the honour of drawing the attention of the department to this important 
question, and to state that in my opinion a shed for coal should be built as soon as 
possible. 

School. — The reports of the school instructor shows that the attendance at school 
has been frequently interrupted during the year. This is explained by the * we 

have been short of officers, due to the illness of some, the retirement of others, and the 
various works under way. 

Conclusion. — It is gratifying to me to state that harmonj pervades the staff of the 
penitentiary. All officers sympathize with and help each other, endeavouring to lessen 
the burden of their duty, and yet make it as effective as possible. Thus discipline in 
general is as perfect as it can be. It is especially agreeable to acknow I ex- 

cellent service of my deputy, who is a man very intelligent, an indefatiL ker. 

and of marked devotion to duty. Since March 7. 1904, this gentleman has filled two 
i harpres. those of deputy warden and chief trade instructor, the duties of the two 
offices being carried on in nn entirely satisfactory manner, notwithstanding the im- 
portance of each. I equally owe you, as inspectors, thanks for the support and assist- 



32 DEPART HEM OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

ance you have given me in the discharge of my duties, and for the good advice you 
have given me during the year. 

Tours respectfully, 

OSCAR BEATTCHAMP, 

Warden. 



[Appendix to the Warden's Report.] 

St. Vincent he Pal i.. July 1, 1905. 
Memorandum for the Warden: 

I have the honour to submit the following report of the building and other 
industrial operation? at this institution for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. 

New workshops. — The now shop buildings consisting of stoire breakers, machine, 
blacksmiths; tinsmiths shops and host- house, kc. which were commenced last year, 
have been continued, and the progress of the work satisfactory. The building will be 
400 feet long, 39 feet wide and two stories high. These shops will add much needed 
and modern accommodation to the prison equipment, and permit of the last of the old 
wooden and decayed structures to be removed from the inclosure. The ground floor 
' will be used for the shops mentioned, and the other for ad granaries . - 

quired. The blacksmiths, machine and tinsmiths shop will, at least, be completed this 
fall. 

Grading front grounds. — The unsightly appearance of the grounds, in front of 
the prison has always been a feet to an otherwise imposing pile of buildings. 

The grading of the entire frontage from the south side of the deputy warden's quarters 
to the government block of houses has been undertaken, the rock excavated, and all 
rubbis! 1 to a sufficient depth to permit of a covering of earth to be put on. 

Avenues of tine gravel have been laid out where required, and the balance of the entire 
ge sodded down to an even grade. Cut stone steps have been erected in front of 
the main entrance to the penitentiary and entrance to the deputy warden's house. The 
grading will be continued south from deputy warden's house to the limit of the peui- 
rty, and a side-walk laid. The work already accomplished has a 
marked effect on the appearance of the buildings, showing them up to advantage, and 
presenting a bright and attl ach to the institution. 

Steel work. — The manufacture of ■ Tier doors, locking bars, and other 

. for British Columbia, Stony .Mountain and Alberta penitentiaries, com- 

One carload of barriers and lock- 
ing ba! hipped to Alberta, one carload to Stony Mountain, and two carloads 
to British Columbia. This work is being continued. Thi tor what has already 

, appear in this year's records, as it has been found 
lile to hold back the presentation of accounts until each order in itself is fully 

completed. 

» 

I'u, '. — The road leading pi warden's 

pump house, which • ir to lay new water mains could not be re-graded 

I irk has b tr and the ground around the pump house 

1. The "Id pump ! i pulled down. Those improvements add greatlj 

to thi of that part of the property. 



WARDENS' REPORTS J 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Warden's house. — It was found that the timbers supporting the verandah at the 
back of the warden's house wqre rotted away in many places, rendering it unsafe. This 
has been repaired and made serviceable for at least a few. years longer. The entire 
exterior of the house has received a much needed coat of paint. 

Yard grading. — A very large amount of work has been done during the year 
excavating and clearing refuse out of the yard, which is, by continued attention, 
gradually assuming a better appearance, and rendering observation and oversight easier. 

Kitchen. — The old copper cooking kettles in the convicts' kitchen, which through 
long use had become unserviceable, have been discarded, and a new set of steel kettles 
installed. The elevated platform and railings supporting the old boilers, which shut 
out the light from the front windows, have been removed, and a new set placed on the 
main floor. This change makes a great improvement in the cooking of the convicts' 
food, and imparts brightness and neatness to the kitchen. 

General work. — In addition to the works enumerated there has been a very large 
amount of general repairs to the buildings, including the warden's and accountant's 
offices which have been thoroughly renovated. The warden's offices, in particular, 
needed attention, it being many years since any repairs had been done. The 
number of requisitions passed on the various shops during the year amount to over 
five thousand, thus keeping the shops very busy. The large number of men required 
on the farm, quarry, and grading gangs, and the large number employed on work for 
other penitentiaries, has rendered it difficult to keep the other gangs fully manned. 

It must be remembered that a large percentage of our population are physically 
weak on entering, and unfit to perform an ordinary day's labour. This renders it 
difficult to carry out every detail of labour to advantage and with dispatch. 

It is also noticeable to all that the character of our population has undergone a 
remarkable change within the past few years. There is no longer the supply of clerks 
and mechanics that were to be found in every department a few years ago, the excep- 
tion to-day is to see a clerk or trained mechanic coming in. Thus we have the crude 
element left to mould to our needs to the best advantage of the institution and the 
unfortunate concerned, enabling him the better to earn an honest living on his dis- 
charge. 

In conclusion, I have to thank the officers in general for the willingness with which 
they have responded to many calls for extra attention to work. 

I am much indebted to you for courteous and ready attention to all matters put 
before you. 

I am also deeply grateful to the chief keeper for the ready and loyal assistance he 
has rendered me during the year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEO. A. PRATT, 

D. W. & C. T. I. 



34—3 



34 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



DORCHESTER. 

Dorchester, September 11, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Gentlemen, — I have the honour to submit my annual report comprising the usual 
statistical tables and reports of officers of the various departments of Dorchester peni- 
tentiary for the year 1904-05. 

We began the year with 250 convicts and closed with 233, a decrease of 17. The 
average during the year was 250 -7, against 244 last year. 

There were received from common jails 88 males and 4 females, 9 from military 
prisons, 1 from other penitentiaries, and 2 who had forfeited parole, a total of 104. 

There were discharged by expiration of sentence 65 males and 2 females. Five 
males were pardoned; 40 males and 3 females released on parole; 5 removed by order 
of court, and one sent to Kingston penitentiary, a total of 121. 

There was one unsuccessful attempt to escape during the year. 

There were no deaths, and there has been no serious sickness during the year, and 
the general health of the convicts has been good. There have been no accidents of a 
serious nature. Owing to a very dry season the hay crop was short and pastures were 
poor, resulting in our stock of cattle coming to stables in rather thin condition — those 
intended for beef being scarcely fit for the butcher; our finding it necessary to winter 
over a heavier stock than our fodder warranted, and the consequent purchase of ten tons 
hay to bring it through, an unusual occurrence at this institution. Vegetables and 
cereals were a fairly good crop. 

The second section of the new stone workshops, commenced last autumn, is 
rapidly rising towards completion. We hope to have this section of 250 feet finished 
by the time winter sets in, and be prepared to commence on the third section on the 
opening of spring. 

We have commenced the construction of the new stone reservoir which is to take 
the place of the old wooden tank which had become leaky and useless. This one, 
which is to be 90 feet by 20 feet and 12 feet high, will with the other reservoir now in 
use, be sufficient for all time. We hope to have it finished this autumn, a large portion 
of the stone required having been prepared during the winter. 

The discipline of the prison has been well maintained, and the officers continue to 
perform their duties faithfully according to their best abilities. 
I have the honour to be, gentlemen, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. A. KIRK, 

Warden. 



WARDEXS' REPORTS 35 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



MANITOBA. 

Stony Mountain, September 16, 1905. 
The Inspector of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sms, — I have the honour to submit my annual report, together with crime statis- 
tics and other reports in connection with this penitentiary for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1905. 

Remaining at midnight, June 30, 1904 156 

Received since — 

From common jails (including 1 female) 104 

One female convict transferred from Kingston peni- 
tentiary to Selkirk asylum 1 

105 

261 

Discharged since — 

By expiration of sentence 40 

" pardon 11 

" parole 14 

" death 2 

" escape 2 

" transfer to lunatic asylum (Selkirk) 1 

'" transfer to Kingston penitentiary (female).. .. 1 

71 

Remaining at midnight, June 30, 1905 190 

The daily average for the year was 177, as against 144 for the previous year. 

The chief trade instructor's report attached shows what work has been done in the 
different departments during the fiscal year. 

At the time I am writing, the walls of the prison extension wing are up, and, had 
it not been for the delay we were put to in not receiving lumber and other material 
required from Winnipeg to carry on the work, we could easily have had the roof on by 
this time, which would have enabled us to work at the inside during the winter; how- 
ever, I think we can put on a temporary roof, and this will allow us to do so. Notwith- 
standing the delay in receiving the lumber, I am still of opinion that the building will 
be ready for occupation during the winter of 1906-7. 

We have this summer up to the present date made about 750,000 bricks. They are 
all of good quality. 

The first building of the row of new shops was completed last autumn and fitted 
up as a temporary prison to relieve the overcrowded state of the main building. It 
accommodates sixty-four convicts and is bright and airy. 

Our bakery and kitchen are altogether too small for our present population and 
should be enlarged as soon as possible. 

We should carry on farming more extensively than we do, but this cannot be done 
until a farm stable is built to accommodate the stock required to work the farm. 

The convicts have been kept busy all the summer making brick, quarrying, dress- 
ing stone, building, farm work, blacksmith and carpenters' work, besides tailoring, 

34—34 



36 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

shoemaking, bake shop, kitchen, &c. They have worked well throughout the year, and 
their conduct, with a few exceptions, has been very good. 

We had two escapes during the last fiscal year, one was recaptured, the other is 
still at large — these escapes occurred through gross carelessness on the part of the 
officers in charge. 

All convicts are now, on admission to the penitentiary, photographed and measured 
under the Bertillion system. 

As I have stated in a previous report, a serious question that has always existed 
in all penal institutions is the danger run by the unavoidable association of young 
prisoners, first offenders, or men of comparatively good character, with hardened and 
habitual criminals. As long as these different classes have to be confined under one 
roof this difficulty is practically insurmountable. A system that would allow of classi- 
fication of prisons, whereby prisoners, for whom there was still hope of reformation 
could be confined in one institution, and hopeless recidivists in another, altogether 
separate, would be of immense value in this respect. The threat of removal from 
the first place of confinement to the more severe would act as a deterrent, 
the mere fact that the stigma attaching to serving a sentence in the former of 
these two classes would be less disgraceful than a similar sentence in the latter would 
serve as an inducement to good conduct generally. There must necessarily be in such 
an institution as this, prisoners whose crimes are caused perhaps by hasty temper, or 
committed under the influence of intoxication. Where intoxication is not habitual,, 
these men under proper influence and separated from evil association might reasonably 
be expected to become good citizens, while the criminals who are, and always will be a' 
danger to society at large, might be placed in confinement elsewhere in some prison 
. where confinement — apart from reformation — was a prime consideration. 

As I have often reported, too much care cannot be taken in the selection of officers 
for penitentiary service. General Sir Edmund F. Du Cane has observed: — 

' The importance of selecting good officers for prison duties cannot be overrated. 
The officer who is in charge of prisoners has such power, for good or evil, over his 
fellow men, that I do not think there are many positions more responsible than that 
which he occupies, nor, on the whole, are there, I think, many in which the officer is 
exposed to more temptation to neglect his duty, or abuse his trust.' 

There has been an improvement in the staff of this penitentiary lately, but it will 
be difficult to keep it up to a proper standard at the present rate of pay — men in such 
responsible positions should be better paid. 

I am fortunate in having in Mr. Mitchell a most excellent chief trade instructor, 
and his influence for good with the convicts under his charge is most noticeable. 

I was also fortunate last summer in securing the services of Mr. Stenhouse, a 
good builder, one who thoroughly understands his work. To him, in a great measure, 
is due the credit for the large amount of work done this summer on the new cell wing 
extension. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. G. IRVINE, 

Warden. 



WARDENS' REPORTS 37 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



[Appendix. 
Memo, for Warden. 

In compliance with your request, I have the honour to submit my report on the 
works completed and under construction during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. 

1. New shops. — A portion of this building, measuring 84 feet in length, has been 
erected, and is now being used as a temporary prison, affording accommodation 
for 64 convicts. It has been fitted up in as substantial a manner as possible, 
end while the interior appointments are of only a temporary nature, it has been our 
endeavour to combine the qualities of durability and security with as much neatness 
and compactness as possible. The building is heated in winter by four large stoves, 
and while economy has been studied in the interior decorations, it presents a bright 
and cheerful appearance. A large range has been placed in position for the use of the 
steward's department, and the building is connected by telephone with the main hall. 

2. Water supply. — During the year it was found necessary to increase the water 
supply, and consequently a large cement tank, with a capacity of 12,000 gallons, was 
built in the attic of the prison. A well was bored and a wind mill erected, which, to- 
gether with the previous existing plant, is now capable of providing a sufficient flow 
of water to meet all requirements and afford considerable protection in case of fire. 

3. New fence. — In order to reduce the opportunities of escape to a minimum under 
existing circumstances, a 12-foot fence of 2-inch planks was built to inclose the south- 
ern and eastern boundaries of the prison compound; access to which is obtained by a 
gate placed at the south-west corner, which is worked from a guard house built above. 
This guard house was erected, not only with a view to operating the gate, but also of 
affording additional security, as it commands a view of the brick yard and surround- 
ings. 

4. Lamp room.— As it was necessary to pull down the lamp room at the north 
end of the prison, on account of it occupying part of the space on which the prison 
extension is in course of erection, a new one was built and occupies a position in the 
compound, formed by an angle in the wall of passage leading from the prison into 
the hospital. The building is fire proof, being constructed of brick, and having a 
cement floor and roof. 

5. Boundary wall. — The work of building this wall is being carried on as fast as 
opportunity affords, but as the mason's department has been fully occupied with the 
erection of the prison extension and other minor works, neither much time nor labour 
could be spared to bring this work to a completion. It has, however, been levelled o*E 
at the north-east corner, and partly extended on the western side. Temporary shelters 
have been erected on the north-west and north-east corners, at each of which points a 
E-inch plank and iron railed patrol walk has been laid down to a distance of about 
100 feet, which permits the officers on guard an uninterrupted view of the inclosure 
and surroundings. 

6. Prison extension. — The work of excavation for the foundations of this building 
iwas only commenced last fall and finished in the spring of this year, and in conse- 
quence there is not much to report on the work at present. However, the foundations 
are laid, and the brick work is being pushed forward with all despatch. The moulds 
for cement blocks, together with the window frames and sashes, are being made in the 



38 DEPARTMENT OF JLHTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

carpenter shop, while all the stone work is being cut by the mason's department. All 
of the stone used has been taken from the prison quarry, with the exception of that 
required for the lintels over the windows. The brick yard is supplying all the bricks 
required. The engineer's department is busy making barriers for the windows, and 
I trust that the outside and a considerable portion of the inside walls will be com- 
pleted before the cold weather sets in. 

7. General. — All the industrial departments have been kept busy during the year. 

(a) The carpenter shop, besides executing all the repairs incidental to an institu- 
tion of this description, have made all the wood work necessary for the new shops, and 
are at present very busy with the work of the prison extension. 

(b) The engineers' and blacksmiths' department have also been fully occupied 
in preparing the barriers and other iron work necessary in the new shops and prison 
extension, besides fitting up the wind mill, ironing moulds for cement blocks, horse 
shoeing and other general work. 

In connection with this department, I would venture to remark that the accom- 
modation provided is altogether inadequate for the amount of work to be done, and, 
therefore, the number of convicts employed is insufficient to handle the increasing 
quantity of work which has to be undertaken. 

(c) Masons and brick yard. — The work of these departments is being carried on 
in a satisfactory manner, considering the large quantity of unskilled labour employed. 
During the year the brick yard turned out about 750,000 bricks, which, as they did not 
commence active operations until late in the season, and had to close up entirely dur- 
ing the winter, is to my mind very satisfactory. The masons have been very busy with 
repairs, the various buildings completed and those in course of construction at present. 

(d) The tailors' shop has also been kept well employed, and has supplied all the 
clothing required by officers and convicts, not only in this institution, but also for the 
jails at Regina and Prince Albert. 

(e) The shoe shop, besides executing all repairs, has made all boots, shoes, mocca- 
sins, &c, needful for the staff and convicts here, besides filling all the orders received 
from the two jails previously mentioned. 

A. R. MITCHELL, 

Chief Trades Instructor. 



WARDENS' REPORTS 39 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

New Westminster, October 10, 1905. 
Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 

Ottawa. , 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit my annual report, accompanied by statistical 
and financial statements, for the year 1904-5. 

The expenditure of this institution for the year was $50,274.38. 

The following tabular statement shows the movement of convicts for the year 
just closed: — 

Received — 

Remaining at midnight June 30, 1904 109 

From common jails 59 

168 

Discharged — 

By expiration of sentence 17 

" pardon 1 

" parole 7 

" death 1 

" returned to provincial jail 2 

" removed by order of court 1 

29 



139 
I expected to be able to report that we had occupied our new wing by this time, 
but owing to the unfortunate delays in the delivery of barriers and material the 
occupation has been delayed at least six months. When occupied we will have cell 
accommodation for 212. 

Judging by the increase of convicts in British Columbia, I think it advisable to 
start as soon as possible the building of another wing, which not only will be necessary 
soon, but will give employment to a large number of men. 

The chief trade instructor's memorandum goes fully into the season's work, and 
the officers continue to do their duty faithfully and well. 
I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. C. WHYTE, 

Warden. 



40 DEPARTMENT OF J VSTIOE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



[Appendix.] 

Memo, for the Warden. 

I have the honour to submit the following report on building and other industrial 
work carried on for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. 

New Wing. — Good progress has been made with the building, the whole of the 
brick and concrete work being finished, with the exception of the pressed brick lining 
on the inside face of the walls and the granolithic floors in the basement. The pressed 
brick should have been made last summer, but our brick instructor being employed at 
the Manitoba penitentiary and not returning until too late in the season, we had to 
wait until this year. However, one kiln is nearly ready to burn, so we hope to be able 
to finish the brick work in the near future. The outside of the walls above the granite 
foundation has been finished with a coating of cement and sand laid off into blocks, 
the cornice being turreted, and composed of cement stone blocks — a date stone ' 1904 ' 
being let in on each side of the building. The roof is composed of concrete with ex- 
panded metal embedded in and finished with a coating of Trinidad asphalt, making it 
water-proof as well as fire-proof, the rain being carried off down the soil vent pipes in 
the centre of the building. 

■ Sixty cell barriers were received on June 23. These we hope to have in place 
before long, and will then be ready for the remaining sixty. The water to cells, gives 
us considerable extra work in piping, two distinct services having to be used, on 
account of our spring water supply being insufficient for all purposes ; we have to con- 
nect this for the wash-basins, and use the creek supply from the dam for flushing the 
water closets. Most of the pipes and fittings are at hand and when the pipe cutting 
and threading machine is installed we will be able to carry out the work promptly. 
There is still a great deal of material to be received for the construction, the long 
distance most of it had to be brought, naturally caused us delay, and could the orders 
have been filled more promptly no doubt the building would have been much more 
advanced. 

New building. — An addition to the coal store house on wharf, 16 x 26, was erected 
during the winter, for the storage of anthracite coal. 

Brick yard. — The brick makers were busy last fall and this spring, and have nearly 
completed a kiln containing about 45 M. pressed and 200 M. common bricks. This 
department gives employment to about 38 convicts. 

Stone shed. — The cement blocks for new wing were all finished by November 13 
last, after which considerable granite was prepared for the foundation of the new wing 
extension. A dressed granite crossing for the side walk at the front gate containing 
448 sq. feet was prepared and put down and is doing good service. Spare men were 
employed breaking granite for macadam. 

Reservoir No. 2. — This work was finished and put into commission on October 17, 
its capacity being 65,937 gallons. It has been in constant use since and given every 
satisfaction. On examination recently not a flaw could be found in it. This reflects 
great credit on the carrying out of this work. The collecting tank above the stable 
was found to be leaking at the bottom. This was remedied by putting in five inches of 
concrete, and the cover was given a coat of tar and gravel. 



WARDENS' REPORTS 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Retaining Wall. — The round end of the retaining wall at the warden's quarters 
was finished by us. It is joined to the wall (erected by the provincial government) at 
one end, the other end is finished by a pier. Two more piers are provided for the iron 
gates and finished with cement caps. The body of this wall was built of brick, and 
faced with cement and sand, the piers being of concrete. Iron railings and gates are 
fixed in position and give a very pleasing effect to this entrance. 

Boundary fence. — During February nearly 400 feet was blown down, in four 
different places. This was all replaced. 

Ice. — About 40 tons of ice was stored in February. So far this has kept in fair 
condition, although no proper ice-house is available. 

Repairs to buildings. — General repairs have been carried out where necessary, 
but a great deal will have to be done before long. 

Shops. — The shops have all been fully employed, and handicapped as they are for 
room, have done well both in the quality and quantity of work turned out. 

H. DISNEY, 

Chief Trade Instructor. 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX C. 



SURGEONS' REPORTS. 



43 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



KINGSTON, 

To Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour herewith, as required by statute, to submit my annual 
report of the medical department of this penitentiary for the year ended June 30, 
1905. 

The general sanitation has been all that could be expected, and the cleanliness of 
the prison and the prisoners has been up to the usual standard. The ventilation in 
the dormitories and the workshops and other buildings has given every satisfaction, 
and the heating arrangements in the different parts were carried out with much care, 
and deserve special mention. 

There was considerable sickness amongst the prisoners throughout the year, and 
besides a large number continually in the hospital, the number of dispensary 
patients for whom special prescriptions were provided was very large. In the carry- 
ing out of my directions as regards treatment, care and diet, for the well being of 
those under our charge, the hospital overseer and his assistant discharged their dntits 
well and faithfully both during the day as well as the night service. The sick dietary 
under the charge of the overseers being specially prepared in the diet kitchen devoted 
to that purpose, and from which each one received his food that is indicated by his 
disease and best suited for a speedy recovery. 

Influenza or La Grippe has been, as usual, the cause of the development of many 
of the complaints, for not only is this malady itself very distressing and usually 
attended with prolonged convalescence, but it has an extraordinary aptitude for discov- 
ering the weak points in the system, and for bringing into active prominence latent 
flaws which otherwise might lie dormant. 

The <very few cases of tuberculosis is a feature worthy of remark, and it is not 
known that the disease was ever contracted within the institution; the few suffering 
from it came into prison with it, mostly in the chronic form. We should be more im- 
pressed with the idea, that it is only infectious and communicable where simple sani- 
tary requirements have been neglected. 

As pure water is absolutely essential to the preservation of health, I may say that 
there are few communities in which greater care has been taken for the procuring and 
maintaining a pure, wholesome and sufficient water supply. An examination of it made 
several times during the year proved to my satisfaction that for drinking purposes a 
high degree of potability was being secured. 

We are coming to understand more and more every day the germ theory, and to 
appreciate that a great deal of disease is preventable, because its cause may be eradi- 
cated by the proper and vigorous employment of disinfectant agents, the properties of 
which are now fully studied to meet the existing conditions of scientific advancement. 

In consideration of the great amount of sickness, there were very few deaths, for 
besides the care and treatment all the comprehensive preventative measures, such as 
isolation, vaccination, hygiene, &c, which have conserved human life everywhere to 
figures beyond computation, have been employed. 

In addition the means already outlined by which disease may be combatted and 
prevented, and the health of the prisoners promoted and maintained, may be mentioned 
plenty of pure air. dry and well ventilated clean apartments fnr sleeping and working 
in, perfect cleanliness of person, clothing and bedding; regular food and cleanliness of 
kitchen and dietary utensils, as important sanitary features. 

45 



46 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

As in all prison populations, some are afflicted with syphilis in one of its stages, 
and in dealing with it the obligations of the profession especially expose the surgeon 
in dealing with or operating upon this class. Notwithstanding the fact that it is un- 
fortunately the popular belief that he is singularly immune to contagion of all kinds, 
a- if guarded by a special Providence, every precaution is taken to minimize the risk. 

As usual there was a great deal of sickness amongst the officers, but I am glad 
to be able to report that, though in many cases the diseases assumed a serious charac- 
ter, there were no fatalities. There were 118 cases of sickness among the officers during 
the year. There were no accidents amongst officers or convicts. 

Insane ward. — -The ward has been thoroughly renovated during the year, and is 
always kept scrupulously clean. There have been fewer inmates at the end of the year 
than there have been for years, as a great many being restored to mental health, were 
returned to the general prison where they were permitted to resume their occupation. 
The number of insane at the beginning of the year was 29 ; admitted during the year, 
24; admitted from the prison, 21; transferred to provincial asylum at expiration of 
sentence, 6 ; discharged cured, 17 ; improved to resume work, 3. 

Prison of isolation. — This ward is always in a good sanitary condition, and the 
prisoners appear quite healthy. The cells and corridors are kept clean, indicating the 
careful supervision of those who have charge of this department. Excited and dis- 
turbed prisoners are often restored to perfect health by a term in this ward. 

Female ward. — The inmates who comprise the contingent in this ward were all 
in good health at the end of the year. There was very little sickness amongst them, 
and they were carefully looked after by the matron in matters of health. Cleanliness 
prevails everywhere. 

Prescriptions. — The number of prescriptions dispensed during the year indepen- 
dent of hospital patients amounted to : For officers, 904; prison of isolation. 134; in- 
sane ward, 254 ; female ward, 250 ; dispensary patients, 4,691 ; teeth extracted, 173 ; 
number of days in hospital, 4,476 ; aggregate number of prisoners for whom treatment 
was prescribed during the year, 5,777; number of officers who received treatment, 118; 
prisoners treated in hospital, 452. In the discharge of my professional duties. I wish 
to thank all those who gave me their support. Mr. Gunn, hospital overseer, who 
assiduously carried out my directions, has merited special mention. 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE FOR DRUGS AND MEDICINES. 

Stock on hand June 30, 1904 $ 193 40 

Drugs and medicines purchased 545 81 

$ 739 21 

June 30, 1905, drugs. &c, on hand $ 234 62 

Received for medicines supplied officers 129 17 

363 79 

Net expenditure of drugs $ 375 42 

Per capita cost 84J 

Appended hereto will be found the usual returns. 
I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

DANIEL PHELAN, M.D., 

Surgeon. 



SURGEONS' REPORTS 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 
Annual Return of Sick Treated in Hospital from July 1, 1904, to June 30, 1905. 



Diseases. 


Remained. 


Admitted. 


Total. 


Died. 


Dis- 
charged. 


Remain- 
ing. 






1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

52 

2 

4 

1 

27 

18 

19 

1 

25 

1 

40 

3 

1 

3 

2 

9 

1 

6 

4 

2 

1 

56 

30 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

11 

2 

5 


1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

52 

2 

5 

1 

27 

18 

19 

1 

26 

1 

40 

3 

1 

3 

2 

9 

1 

6 

4 

2 

1 

58 

30 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 




1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
52 
2 
5 






















































1 










1 








27 

18 

18 

1 

24 

1 

40 

3 

1 

3 

2 

7 
























Debility 


1 




2 


























































1 






6 

4 

2 

1 

56 

30 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

10 

2 

5 
























2 




2 




/ ■ • 






































11 
2 
5 
1 

4 
4 
1 
7 
1 
1 




I 




















1 


1 






4 
4 


4 
4 
1 

7 

1 
1 














































2 
2 
6 
8 
32 

27 

3 
1 
3 
3 


2 
2 






1 








6 

8 
32 

27 

3 

1 
3 
3 






1 








1 31 




















































1 










27 








1 










3 
3 








« 






















Wound 


















10 


452 


462 


5 


447 


10 



48 



DEPARTUEyT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

Return of Criminal Insane Convicts in the Insane Ward, from July 1, 1904, to 

June 30, 1905. 



Distribution. 



Male. Total. 



Remained under treatment on JtJne 30, 1904 

Since admitted — 

Kingston penitentiary 

St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary 

Dorchester penitentiary 

Total number under treatment during the above period 

Discharged — 

Cured 

Improved sufficiently to resume work. . 

Transferred to Provincial Asylum on expiration of sentence 

Died 

Remaining under treatment on June 30, 1905 



36 


36 


21 


21 


2 


2 


1 


1 


60 


60 


17 


17 


3 


3 


6 


6 


5 


5 


29 


29 



CONVICTS ADMITTED INTO THE INSANE WARD. 




S URGEOyS' REPORT* 



49 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



OBITUARY. 



Xo. 



Age. 



Kate of Death. 



Duration of insanitv. 



Proximate cause 
of Death. 



Remarks. 



C H42 

D 277 

D 913 

D 602 

D 150 



58 
37 



39 
25 



July 23. 1904. . . 
August 3. 1904 . . . 
November 11. 1904 
February 25. 1905. 
May 20, 1905 



244 days Paresis 

1 year 314 days Paralysis. . . 

28 days Suicide 

jus days Paralysis. . . 

2 rears 209 davs Paresis 



Hanging. 



DANIEL PHELAX, M.D., 

'"0?! and Med. Sup., Insane Asylum. 



ST. YIXCEXT DE PAUL. 



St. Vincent de Paul, July 1, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Gentlemen, — I have the honour to tender you my report for the fiscal year 1904- 
1905. Nothing very particular occurred in my department, though I notice that we 
had during a few months more patients than during the previous year. Twenty-eight 
1 atients were treated in the hospital. Xearly all cases were more or less serious, never- 
theless two convicts died here, one of pulmonary tuberculosis, and the second of 
pneumonia. 

I have to draw your attention to the many cases of tuberculosis in this in- 
stitution. Before a prisoner is sent here he has been detained for weeks, sometimes 
months, in jail. As far as I can learn prisoners who are -simply held or awaiting to be 
transferred to the penitentiary are never examined by any doctor unless in need of 
medical treatment. It is evident that a latent tuberculosis has a great chance to 
develop. 

Moreover if we add the lack of exercise, influence of confinement, we must nol 
wonder to find many convicts sometimes with very active lesions when they have 
entered here seemingly in good health. All these patients should be isolated and be 
given hygienic and dietetic treatment from the very moment they are admitted to thi 
penitentiary. 

We have no isolating cells here and we need them greatly for the above inmates. 
All the blankets, comforters and quilts should be disinfected in proper way so thai 
they might not become the means of spreading infection of tuberculosis. The bucket 
system for receiving the dejecta of the convicts during the night is most anti-hygienic. 
It is deplorable as far as it permits the emanation of odors and gas, and it i- 
deleterious to tin- health of the inmate. The individual closet in the cells with trap 
and cover is certainly to be recommended in place of the bucket system. 

During the fiscal year many old officers "ii the staff had to tender their resignation 
owing to their had health, and I regret to state that one of them, Mr. Gilbert ( !har- 
trand, died :i month after, having .-ewe.] 29 years in this institution. 

()n my report "f lasl year. 1 suggested 'hat r ln- use of razors upon convicts 
abolished. I once more draw your attention to the question, owing- to the danger of 
infection. Since a tew weeks. I have noticed that the convict^ are greatly afieeted bj 

34—4 



50 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

the heat. Could it not be arranged that their suits be of bright colour and more light 
during the summer, principally for those working outside in the sun ? What is said of 
the convicts could be also well applied to the officers. They ought to be given very 
light material for the uniforms, many officers if not all the staff, having to stand in 
the sun with heavy clothes on. The expense by the above change would not be very 
great, and every one would feel more comfortable. 

The general sanitary condition of officers and convicts was fair. Many officers 
had to remain home owing to illness. Twenty-eight convicts were treated in the hos- 
pital and at the end of the year, two patients only are inmates in the ward. 

The only accident worthy to be mentioned, occurred to an officer who shot him-elf 
through the leg by accident with his revolver. He was unfit for duty during 3 months, 
the wound being nearly 6 inches long and 1 inch deep. The patient has completely 
recovered now. 

Accident. — None serious. 

Deaths. — Blondin, J. B., pulmonary tuberculosis; Pominville Olivier, pneumonia. 

Transferred. — Ford, William, insane; Williams, Chas., insane. 

Yours respectfully, 

AD. ALLAIRE, M.D.. 

Surgeon. 



PATIENTS TREATED IN THE HOSPITAL, 1904-05. 

Abscess 1 

Ataxia locomotrice 1 

Bronchitis 2 

Coltitis 1 

Contusion of the abdomen 1 

Depressed 2 

Dysentery 2 

Gastritis 1 

Gastralgia 2 

Heart disease 2 

Indigestion 2 

Lumbago 1 

Optical nivritis 1 

Orchitis 1 

Palpitation 1 

Pneumonia 1 

Piles 1 

Stricture 1 

Tuberculosis 

Tumor 1 

Six thousand one hundred and twenty-nine consultations were given to officers 
and convicts from June 30 L904, to June 30, 100.".. 



SURGEONS' REPORTS 51 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Diseases Treated in the Cells — 

Abscess 12 

Asthma 7 

Amygdalitis 8 

Adenitis 4 

Boils 14 

Bronchitis '. 35 

Bronchial cata. 'h 3 

Balanite 5 

Colds 137 

Constipation 120 

Consumption 11 

Contusion 9 

Cystitis 22 

Cholera morbus 4 

Clap 13 

Diarrhoea 60 

Dyspepsia 17 

Heart disease 5 

Hernia inquinal 1l' 

Hemorrhoid external fi 

Mental alienation 2 

Locomotor ataxia 1 

Lumbago 3 

Neuralgia 8 

Ophthalmia 2 

Palpitation of heart 17 

Phthisis 2 

Pneumonia 1 

Pharingitis : 5 

Rheumatism 11 

Scrofula 4 

Sprains 13 

Tumour (operated) 3 

Orchitis 2 

Tuberculosis (died) 1 

Syphilis 20 

AD. ALLAIRE, M.D., 

Surgeon. 

HOSPITAL OVERSEER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1905. 

Amount of drugs on hand June 30, 1904 $ 107 86 

Amount of drugs purchased from June 30. 1904. 

to June 30, 1905 356 73 

$ 524 59 

I. ESS. 

Amount of drugs on hand June 30, 1905 $ L87 32 

Amount of drugs sold to officers from June 30, 

1904, to June 30, 1905 20 79 

208 11 

Amount of drugs used by convicts from June 30, 1904, 

to June 30, 1905 $ 316 I- 

Cost per capita 

D. O'SHEA, 
July 1, 1905. Hospital ( ' 

34— U 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



DORCHESTER. 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



Dorchester. July 1. 1005. 



Tin Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to >ubmit the statistical reports of my department for 
the year ended June 30, 1905. 

1 have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

E. P. DOHERTY, M.D. 

CASES TREATED IN CELLS. 



Diseases. 




Abscess. 
At iility . 
Asthma. 
Boils . . . 



Bronchitis. 
Burns .... 
Cardialgia. . 
' latarrh. . . . 
( 'ephalagja 
Chills. 
I olds 



Golic . 

( lomedo 

Contusions ... 

I lostiveness 

Cutaneous eruptions 

< '"UtfliS 

Debility 

1 Murrhoea. ... 

Dysentery 

Dyspepsia 

Ghonorrhoea 

Haemoptysis 

Heart disease 

Hernia 

Hemorrhoids , . 
[ncontinence . . . 

Indigestion 

[nfluenza 

1 osomnia 

I .in orrhoea 

Lumbago 

Neuralgia 

i Ophthalmia 

I »titis. . 

Pleurodynia 

Pyrosis - ■ 

Retention 

Rheumatism 

Scrofula 

s. hi' t hn nit . . 

Sprains . 

Stomatitis. 

Stricture 

Syphilis. . 

I eel h extra ted 

I I »nsillitis 

i uberculosis. 
Varico ele 
\\ ounda 
I !pileps3 - . . 



Admitted. 



1 discharged. Remaining. 



7 




45 


4.5 


3 


3 


9 


9 


5 


5 


6 


6 


9 


9 


26 


26 


41 


41 


6 


t 


47 


47 


26 


26 


2 


2 


35 


35 


60 


en 


is 


is 


70 


69 


13 


13 


9 


s 


."> 


5 


■> 


2 


3 


3 


4 


1 


15 


15 


12 


12 


:i!i 


38 

l 


l 
16 


l 
16 


40 


in 


■)■» 


22 


12 


II 


3 


3 


1 


l 






26 


25 


•> 


3 


44 


44 


13 


13 


211 


26 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1U7 


IH7 


21 


■>l 


3 


•j 



SI RGKOXS- REPORTS 



53 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



CASES TREATED IN HOSPITAL. 



I liaeasea 



Remained. 



Admitted. 



Discharged. Remaining. 



Amputation of forearm . 

Debility 

Fracture of arm 

Heart disease 

Hemorrhoids 

Incontinence 

Insanity 

Rheumatism 

Syphilis (tertiary) 

Tuberculosis 



13 



11 



Statement of expenditure for drags and medicine — 

Stock on hand June 30, 1904 $287 27 

Drugs and sundries purchased 165 34 

462 61 

Less: Drags on hand June 30, 1905 $312 23 

Received for medicines supplied officers. . 42 94 

355 17 

Net expenditure for drags $97 44 

Per cupita cost, 39 cents. 

E. P. DOHERTY. ID. 



MAX ITOBA I ' KXITEXTIARY. 



Stony Mountain, August 21. 1905. 



The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs. — 1 have the honour to .>u'>mit my annual report for the year ended June 30, 
1905. 

The general health of the prison has been fairly good. Colds, constipation, diarr- 
hoea, frost bite and eczema have been the most frequent complaints. Ophthalmia 
(granular), or as it is now best known trachoma, has been fairly prevalent here during 
the past year. Without means of isolation on account of the crowded condition of th< 
prison, it became a very troublesome affection. One patient lost his eyesight. 

We have had two deaths during the yrar, one from pneumonia and one from con- 
sumption. One insane convict was transferred to the asylum at Selkirk. 

The health of the officers has been fair. One died from typhoid. Although this 
disease was epidi mic in Winnipeg and surrounding country this was the only case to 
develop here. 



54 



DEPARTMEXT OE JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A ^06 

The number of days lost by officers on account of illness was 347J. 
The usual statements are appended. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

R. W. NEILL, M.D. 

CASES TBEATED IN CELLS. 



Diseases. 



Abscess 

Acne roseaca 

Acne vulgaris 

Alopecia areat a . 
Adenitis tubercular 

Aneurism 

Bilousness 

Blister 

Boils 

Burns 

Bruises 

Bronchitis 

Catarrh nasal .... 
" of ears. . . . 

Carbuncle 

Chilblain 

Cold 

Consumption 

Constipation 

Conjunctivitis . . . . 
Conjestion of liver. 

Corns 

Cough 

Cysts 

Dandruff 

Diarrhoea 

Dropsy 

Dyspepsia 

Endocarditis. ...... 

Enuresis 

Epididymitis 

Epilepsv 

Erysipelas 

Eczema 

Frost bite 

Gleet 

Goitre 

Ghonorrhcca 

Hemorrhoids 

Headache 

Hypochondria . . . . 
Herpes 



Number 

of 

Cases. 



25 
9 
2 
6 

27 
2 
1 
1 

15 
4 

35 
5 

16 

11 
5 
3 
653 
7 
253 
1 
1 
4 

18 

1 

1 

164 

1 

16 
3 
2 
1 
5 

16 
133 

32 
1 

14 
8 

41 

48 
1 
1 



Diseases. 



Number 

of 

Cases. 



Hives 

Hernia 

Indigestion 

Influenza 

Ingrowing toe nails. . . 

Insane 

Insomnia 

Iritis 

Irticaria 

Itch 

Jaundice 

Laryngitis 

Lumbago 

Malaria 

Neuralgia 

Opthalmia 

Otitis media 

Pains, indefinite 

Palpitation of heart . . 

Pediculi 

Pharyngitis 

Psoriasis 

Rheumatism, chronic. 

Sciatica 

Scirrhosis of liver . . . . 

Scrofula 

Scalds. 

Spermatorrhoea. 

Strains . 

Styes. 

Syphilis. 

Teeth extracted. 

Toothache. 

Tonsillitis . 

Tumor of the brain. 

Urticaria. 

Ulcers. 

Vertigo. . . . 

Varicocele. 

Wounds . . 

Worm 



1 

1 

197 

98 

3 

19 

12 

1 

1 

3 

59 

4 

61 

7 

24 

59 

2 

23 

2 

2 

10 

10 

96 

33 

9 

8 

1 

4 

46 

1 

41 

38 

39 

64 

1 

1 

11 

5 

3 

34 

19 



SURGEONS' REPORTS 



55 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



CASES TREATED IN THE HOSPITAL. 



Diseases. 


Remained. 


Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Died. : Remaining. 






1 
1 
1 






1 


Boils 




1 
1 

1 
3 

1 
4 

1 














1 

1 








6 

1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 


1 


3 


























1 




1 

1 
1 
3 






















1 






1 








1 




2 


1 

1 
1 
2 


1 


1 


























4 


30 


23 2 


9 



Statement of expenditure for drugs and medicines. — 

Stock on hand, June 30, 1904 $201 69 

Drugs and sundries purchased 228 11 

432 80 
Drugs on hand, June 30, 1905 226 47 

206 33 

Received for medicine supplied to officers 36 24 

Net expenditure for the year $170 n9 

Per .apita cost, $0.89.5. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



New Westminster. July 1, 1905. 

The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the "honour to submit my annual report as surgeon of the Briti-h 
Columbia penitentiary. 

With few exceptions the health of the convicts has been good, the only death 
(luring the year being that of an Indian who succumbed to uraemia after a short 111 — 
nes-. The other cases treated in hospital were not of a severe nature, and it will be 
noticed that while the number of convicts admitted to hospital is larger than last year, 
the time spent in hospital is much less. 

The number of convicts treated in cells shows an increase over last year, as does 
the nnmbf-r of piescriptinns filled. This increase, as well as the increase in the num- 



56 



DEPARTUEXT OF J I 8TICE 



5-6 EDWARO VII.. A. 1906 

ber of hospital patients, is, I think, to a large extent accounted for by the increase in 
the prison population, which is now very much larger than it has ever been. 

The usual tables are appended, showing the work of my department, and 
I have the honour to be. sirs, 

Your obedient .-erv.int. 

W. A. De WOLF SMITH, 

Surgeon. 

Statement of drugs and medicines, 1901-05 : — 

Value of drugs on hand June 30. 1904 $211 47 

Value of drugs purchased, 1904-05 229 86 

441 33 

Value of drugs on hand. June 30. 1905 209 02 

Received for medicine supplied officers 18 19 

227 21 

Net cost of drags. &c $214 12 



Cost per capita $1.74. 



CASES TREATED IX HOSPITAL. 




Furuncle 
Cut on neck. 
Pain in chest 
Ulcer. 
Conjunctivitis 
Opium fiend 
Blood poisoning 
Uraemia 
Abscess 
Dislocation 
Pain in back 
Rheumatism 



Number of days spent in hospital, 187. 



SURGEOXH- REPORTS 



57 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



CASES TREATED IN CELLS. 




Acne 

Anvrexia. . . 

Abscess 

Burn 

Bruises 

Bilious 

Colic 

Cystitis 

Cough 

Corns 

Cold 

Catarrh 

Constipation. 
Conjunctivitis 

Coryza 

Diarrhoea . . . 

Eczema 

Furuncle. . . . 
Gum boil. . . . 
Gastritis .... 



Haemorrhoids... 

Headache 

Indigestion. . . 

Insomnia 

Neuralgia 

Onychia 

Pain in back . . 
Pain in chest . . . 
Pain in side . . . 
Rheumatism . . 

Sprain 

Spermatorrhoea. 
Swollen glands. 

Tonsillitis 

Toothache . . . . 

Tumor 

Teeth extracted 

Total. 



10' 
18 
83 

4 

1 

1 
61 
11 
16 
45 

1 

1 

3 
11 
24 

1 
36 



821 



Number of prescriptions filled, 1,762. 







DEATH IN HOSPITAL. 


Name. 


Age. 


Disease. 


Date Date Davs 

"f of Nationality. in 

Admission. Death. Hospital. 


Joseph Peel 


24 


T- 

L raenua. . . 


March 4. 1905... March 11, 1905.. Canadian In- 8 

dian. 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX D. 



CHAPLAINS' REPORTS. 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



KINGSTON. 

Portsmouth, July 1. 1905. 

To the Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — Time reminds me that it is my duty to submit to you my annual report for 
the year ended June 30, 1905. 

On that date there were under my charge 281 men and 4 women, making the same 
total as last year's. 

In regard to their religious belief they are thus distributed: — 

Church of England 113 

Methodist 8* 

Presbyterian 48 

Baptist 20 

Unitarian 1 

Congregationalist 1 

Salvation Army 1 

Jewish 1 

Lutheran 12 

2?5 

It gives me much pleasure to say that our choir is in an excellent state of effici- 
ency, and take a deep interest in their duties. We have two very good orgapists who 
assist each other in the choir practices. The services are well rendered. 

I have acted on your thoughtful suggestion in regard to the chapel services, and 
have arranged that they shall consist, from time to time, of song service and special 
music, and accordingly I have invited musicians from the city to take part. We were 
favoured with a visit from the ' MeLster Singers ' last November. They are members 
of the Westminster Abbey choir. Their very beautiful singing was thoroughly enjoyed 
and will never be forgotten. These change- impart much pleasure and instruction, 
and do lasting good. 

We are grateful to those who. at some trouble and expense to themselves, give us 
the benefit of their talents. 

I believe the great majority of the men value the privilege of attending church. 
and their behaviour, with very few exceptions, is exemplary. The week-day clas 
have been very well attended, and the men have thanked me for the instructions given 
to them. This is enci uraging. 

The partition between the chapel and the school has been replaced, and adds much 
to the comfort and appearance of the chapel. It requires to be columned so as to be 
in keeping with the other wall decorations. I venture to hope to see a stained glass 
window in the Norman arch of the doorway in the partition, and a green rep curtain 
instead of a door. These are desirable improvements, and would give a finished If ok 
to the chapel. 

Once again I tender to the warden, deputy warden and the officers generally my 
warmest thanks for the assistance they have so readily and courteously given me in 
the discharge of my duties as chaplain. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedii nt s 'rvant, 

A. W. COOKE 

Pint, stani Chaplain. 
61 



62 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. '906 
Portsmouth, July 1, 1905. 
To the Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Dear Sirs, — The following is my annual report for the past fiscal year. 

Our chapel register has entered on its pages the names of 160 men and 3 women 
who claim to belong to the Catholic faith, making the same total as was regis- 
tered a year ago on our books. 

Four times during the year I was called upon to admister the last sacraments 
and assist at the burial services of convicts Brennan, Beaulieu, Clark and Connolly, 
who had been ailing for many months previous to their deaths. 

The morning and afternoon services on the Sundays and holy days have been 
punctually attended to and nothing has been left undone to make them both interesting 
and instructive for the men. 

As in previous years, the number of communicants has been most satisfactory, and 
in consequence a source of great edification to the congregration on the whole. 

The general conduct of the convicts has been likewise most exemplary during the 
time of morning and afternoon devotions, and hence a source of great edification to me. 

On all occasions the keepers and guards were must assiduous in the p rforman :e 
of their duties, and ever ready to second me in my efforts to facilitate the fulfilment 
of the prison regulations. 

Thanking all the officers for their many acts of kindness. 
I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Tours most respectfully, 

m. Mcdonald, 

Roman Catholic Chaplain. 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 

St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary. August 1, 1905. 

The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Honourable Sirs, — I have the honour to present my annual report for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1905. 

At that date, 294 convicts figured on my list after the following movement during 
the elapsed year : — 
113 arrived. 

1 transferred from the protestant chapel. 
72 discharged. 
9 pardoned. 
28 licensed. 
1 escaped. 

1 sent to Kingston insane ward. 

2 died. 

On June 4 last we were honoured with the visif from Eis Lordship the Archbishop 
of Montreal, Monseigneur Bruchesi, whose Christlike feelings for all the sufferers and 
particularly the prisoners are so well known. 

This favour and the ensuing confirmation of thirteen men bad been happily 
anticipate 1 even at E'*ter time ami caused g neral revival <<( religious practices in 
our Catholic flock. 



CHAPLAIXf REPORTS 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

This was equally helped by the skilful zeal of our organist and chanters, who 
frequently delighted us with remarkable religious performances. 

Have I to add that the men's conduct has improved likewise in the chapel and in 
the use of library books? 

Let me. honourable sirs, express once more my most sincere sentiments of gratitude 
for your kindness and help and subscribe. 

Your humble servant, 

L. O. HAREL, 

Roman Catholic Chap: 



St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, July 1, 1905. 
To the Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Dear Sirs, — I beg herewith to submit my tenth annual report as Protestant chap- 
lain of this penitentiary. 

During the year from June 30, 1904, to June. 30, 1905, there have been in all 91 
prisoners under my care, of whom TO were remaining on June 30, 1904, and 21 have 
since been received. 

Movement of convicts for year ending June 30, 1905 : — 

Discharged 16 

Pardoned 8 

Licensed 5 

Transferred 2 

Remaining June 00, 1905 60 



91 
Place of birth — 

Canada 49 

England 19 

Scotland 4 

Ireland 2 

United States erica 12 

Germany 1 

Sweden 1 

Denmark 1 

Africa 1 

Cuba 1 



91 
Creed — 

Cliu'ch of England 4' 1 . 

Presliyt ri:m • . . . . 2S 

Methodist 

Baptist 

Lutheran 

Mormon 

Adventist 

Oniverea'ist 

Congregationalist 

Unclassed ! 

91 



64 DEPAKTMEST OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 
CHAPEL. 

I am happy to report that the conduct of the men in the chapel continues to be 
good, the exceptions to the rule being rare and trifling. The improved electric system 
of lighting has been a great benefit, and is greatly appreciated at our early morning 
services, and on dark days. The interior of the chapel has been improved and bright- 
ened through the kindness of the warden in having the pews, officers' seats, desks, &c, 
repainted. We are also indebted to Mr.-. Pratt, the wife of our esteemed deputy 
warden, for the donation of flowers for the decoration of the altar. 



SCHOOL. 

Of the men under my care nine have availed themselves of the privilege of attend- 
ing the school. 

LIBRARY. 

The library has been enlarged by tin- addition of a number of carefully selected 
books, and is well patronized by those who are able to read. 



AFTER DISCHARGE. 

As may be supposed, the interest of the chaplain in those committed to his care 
. does not wholly cease upon their release from prison. It is then, as he knows, that the 
severest test of the success of his efforts on their behalf, and of their own good lesolu- 
lutions usually begins. It is, therefore, a source of great comfort to him, as he bids 
good-bye to one of his flock about to return to the world, to know that such an organi- 
zation as the 'Prisoner.-' Aid Association' is waiting to assist, advise and encourage 
the unfortunate one. and to help him, if he will, to walk uprightly, and therefore 
securely. 

During the year I have iiiveii to all those about to be discharged, who desired it. 
the address of the devoted and painstaking vice-president of the Prisoners' Aid Associ- 
ation. In each case prompt and generous action was taken. The total amount ex- 
pended on meal tickets, lodging, railway fares, overcoat-, underwear, board, &c, &o., 
was $113.11. while $14 was given towards defraying the funeral expenses of one 
released a few days before his death. In another case an amount of several dollars of 
back wages was obtained for a released prisoner. The time given in attending to those 
discharged prisoners amounted to about >ix days ,,f twelve hours each. 

The-,- remarks refer onlj to work amongst the convicts discharged during the 
year from this penitentiary, and do not include the association's larger work in con- 
nection with those released from jail. 

Before concluding this report I desire to offer to the warden, deputy warden ;ind 
the officers generally, my sincere thank.- for the aid they have given me in the per- 
formance of the duties of my offiee. 

1 have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your- most obediently, 

JOHN ROLLIT, 

Prott stant Chaplain. 



CHAPLAINS' REPORTS 65 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



DOECHESTEE. 

Dorchester, N.B., July 1, 1905. 
To Douglas Stewart, and 

G. W. Dawson, Esquires, 
H. M. Inspectors. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to present my twenty-second annual report as Protestant 
chaplain of this penitentiary for the year ending June 30, 1905. 

On that day there were under my charge 12Y prisoners, of whom 6 were women, 
as against a total of 138 for the corresponding day of the preceding year. 

The following is the religious distribution : — 

Church of England 50 

Baptists. 33 

ifethodists 14 

Presbyterians 26 

Unitarian • 1 

Deist 1 

Lutherans 1 

Adventist 1 

Total 127 

In presenting this report my feelings are of no common order for it is the last of a 
long series of twenty-two which represent all the activities in the service during an 
equal number of years. 

I need hardly say that it is a sore day in the history of any man's life in which 
he is made to realize that his work is done. 

On the other hand there are consolations arising out of the consciousness that 
amid much that was human and imperfect I tried to throw my conscience into my 
work. 

During that considerable period of time I have had under my charge nearly 1,200 
prisoners, with whom to deal earnestly and faithfully, and yet humanely, has constant- 
ly called into requisition whatever powers it had pleased God to give me. 

And it is with no small pleasure that I am truly able to say that I have always 
received the greatest respect and attention from that large number of prisoners; my 
successive annual reports bear unvarying evidence upon this point. 

Whilst it is quite true that with a«large proportion the chaplain's work appears to 
be love's labour lost ; yet on the other hand I well know of no small proportion of those 
who have been under my caTe, who have ceased to do evil and have learned to do well. 

Of the staff, I have no other word to say than this : that for two and twenty years, 
from every member of the same — past and present — I have received kind and helpful 
consideration. 

As for the department it has been pleased on various occasions to refer in a gra- 
tifying manner to the quality of my work; and this in the coming days will be to me 
no small source of comfort. 

T now say farewell, and beg to remain, gentlemen, 

Your very obedient servant, 

J. EOY CAMPBELL. 

34—6 



66 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
Dorchester, N.B., September 15, 1905. 

The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit to you my annual report as Roman Catholic 
chaplain of this penitentiary for the fiscal year 1904-05. 

On June 30 last, I had figuring on my prison book 101 males, and 5 females, a 
grand total of 106, as against 112 recorded in my last report. 

It is with a high sense of gratification that I have to express my entire satisfac- 
tion as to the good behaviour, and the spirit of submission of the convicts under my 
spiritual charge, in all things pertaining to my office. 

We had not a single incident of an unpleasant character to mar in any way the 
uniform routine life of our prison. t 

In conclusion I must express my appreciation for the courtesy extended to me by 
the entire staff in the discharge of my official duties. 

I have the honour to be, sirs. 

Your humble servant, 

A. D. CORMIER, Pst. 



MANITOBA PENITENTIARY. 

Stony Mountain, August 3, 1905. 

The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 

Ottawa. - 

Dear Sirs, — I have the honour to present my report for the year ending June 30, 
1905 :— 

No. of convicts on register, June 30, 1904 103 

No. received during year 69 

172 

Discharged by expiration of sentence 24 

Discharged by parole 8 

Discharged by pardon , 9 

Transferred to asylum 1 

Died 1 

43 

Total on register, June 30, l505 l-'!> 

CREEDS. 

( 'hurch of England :,s 

Presbyterian -'"> 

Methodist ' " 

Lutheran ,: '> 

Mnrmon 5 

Baptist ;l 

Advent ist 

Quaker ' 

Total 129 



CHAPLAINS' REPORTS 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

The services on Sunday have proved interesting and profitable. The convicts have 
rendered music that would do credit to the churches of our large cities. I have devoted 
much of my time to personal work among the men, and am fully persuaded that the 
seed sown may yet bear fruit. 

I wish again to thank the warden and officers for their courtesy and kind assist- 
ance. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Tours faithfully, 

F. M. YTKN, 

Protestant Chaplain. 



Stony Mountain, August 14, 1905. 

The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit my report for the year 1905. 
Having taken charge of the Roman Catholic chapel since a few weeks only, I have 
nothing unusual to report. 

On June 30, 1905, I had sixty convicts committed to my spiritual care. Their 
behaviour while assisting at divine office has been till now very good and I have all 
reasons to hope that it will be so in the future. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Tours respectfully, 

ARTHUR BELIVEAU, Priest. 

Roman Catholic Chaplain. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

New Westminster, B.C., June 30, 1905. 

The Inspectors of Penitentiaries 
Ottav a. 

Sms, — I have the honour herewith to submit my report, as Protestant chaplain of 
the British Columbia Penitentiary, for the year ending June 30, 1905. 

The subjoined figures will show a decided increase in our numbers over those of 
last year, but in a growing province, where everything is in a formative state, this is 
only to be expected. 

Convicts remaining June 30, 1904 65 

Convicts received during the fiscal year 42 

Total ministered to during the year 107 

Discharged 11 

Paroled 5 

.Pardoned 1 

Transferred to insane asylum 1 

Total 18 

Total under my charge June 30, 1905 89 

34— 5J 



gg DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

Greeds — 

Church of England 24 

Methodist 23 

Presbyterian 15 

Buddhist 14 

Baptist 7 

Lutheran 3 

Zwinglian 1 

Salvation Army". 1 

No creed 1 

Total 89 

Of the 42 received during the year, 31 received early religious training, and 
attended Sunday school — 7 leave the impression that early religious training was 
almost, if not altogether neglected — 4 have no religious knowledge. 

The age of leaving Sunday school varies from 11 to 20 years, while the average age 
of leaving may be stated as 15 years. 

Again referring solely to convicts received during the year, I find that 11 did not 
use liquor in any form ; 30 have used liquor ; 1 used both liquor and opium. 

Of these 31 who have used liquor, 17 acknowledge drink and 1 opium to have been 
the direct cause of their downfall, and surely it is not too much to say that of the 
remaining 13, at least 6 could trace their shame to drink as an indirect cause. 

These figures are full of meaning for any one who cares to give them even the 
smallest consideration. 

Our organist, Mr. H. Disney, resigned at the close of 1904, after many years of 
faithful and efficient service. He has been succeeded by Miss Mackenzie. 

If expression of countenance means anything at all, then I should say that the 
men are deeply interested in the regular Sunday service, while the hearty singing, and 
the excellent order, encourages one to believe that the men actually enjoy the service. 

I would like to speak of results, but I do not think that is possible. Time alone 
will show into what hearts the Holy Spirit of God has gained an entrance. 

It is perhaps superfluous to speak of the value of the library. Every one knows 
the power of a good book. It is to be hoped that none but the best books will ever 
appear on the shelves of our library. 

The excellent work that is being accomplished by Mr. W. J. Carroll, school in- 
structor, is worthy of note. Owing to the large increase in penitentiary population, 
this work has been interfered with, but with the completion of the new wing the good 
work will go on. 

I take this opportunity to thank the warden and his staff of officers for the 
courtesy extended to me in the discharge of my official duties. 
I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

ALBEKT EDWARD VERT, 

Protestant Chaplain. 

New Westminster. B.C., July 19, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 
g IRi5i — i have the honour to submit my annual report as Roman Catholicchaplain 
of this penitentiary for the year ending .Tune 30, 1!'"."'. 

Divine services were regularly held on all Sundays and holidays throughout the 
year. The convicts' behaviour in the chapel and their attention to the instruction have 
been all that could be desired. 



CHAPLAINS' REPORTS 69 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

During the two past years several convicts have received the privilege of the 
ticket-of-leave. As far as I am aware, none have abused this privilege. 

In closing, I beg to thank the warden, deputy warden and all officers for the assist- 
ance given me in the performance of my duties. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

EDM. PEYTAVTN, 

Roman Catholic Chaplain. 



% 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX E. 



SCHOOL INSTRUCTORS' REPORTS. 



71 



5-6 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



A. 1905 



Kingston, July 3, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sms, — I have the honour to submit my tenth annual report of the school in this 
penitentiary for the year ended June 30, 1905. 

The total number enrolled during the year was 79. Of this number 34 passed 
out capable of reading and writing intelligently, and with a fair knowledge of the ele- 
mentary rules of arithmetic. Nine retired owing to expiration of sentence. 
The present attendance is 36. The studies of these are divided as follows: — 

Reading in Part 1 15 

Reading in Part II 10 

Reading in second book and writing 6 

Reading in third book, writing and arithmetic 5 

The school has been been conducted by Mr. Begg, assistant, in a most satisfactory 
manner. The pupils show every desire to profit by the opportunities afforded them of 
improving their minds 

Their conduct while at school is generally all that could be wished for, and they 
are most attentive to the instruction given in their respective cells during the evening. 
I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. A. GUNN, 

School Instructor. 



LIBRARY RETURN". 



Total 

Number of 

Volumes 

in Library. 



Number 

added 

during the 

Year. 



Average 

Number of 

Convicts 

who used 

Works. 



Total 
Number of 

Issues 
during the 

Year. 



General library ... 

Protestant library 

Roman Catholic library. 

Totals. . 



3,248 
350 . . 


112 


440 
75 
40 


22,880 
3,900 


355 


2,080 






3,953 


112 


555 


28,860 



EDUCATION. 





Males. 


Females. 


Total. 






367 
18 
56 


3 

1 
3 


370 




19 




59 








441 


7 


448 



78 



74 DEPARTMEXT OF JUBTWE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 

Saint Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, July 1 1905. 

To the Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Dear Sirs, — I have the honour to submit to you my twenty-third report of the 
school and library of the penitentiary for the year ended June 30, 1905. 

The total number of convicts enrolled during the year was 62, fifty-two French- 
Canadians, nine English and one Jew. The average daily attendance was 20. 

At the close of the year the school register showed an attendance of twenty-three 
classified as follows : — 

Reading, dictation, arithmetic 13 

Spelling, reading writing and tables 10 

Five English pupils were in Fasquelle's French Course, six French-Canadians in 
the third French reader, five in the third English reader, five in the first English 
reader and two in the French primer. 

Sixty-six men were supplied with school books and slates to study in their cells. 
The conduct of the pupils, while in class, was generally good, but the application 
and attendance had, of course, to suffer from the many interruptions of the school. 
The library is in good condition. 

Before concluding, I beg to tender my sincere thanks to the chaplains for their 
valuable help in the discharge of my duties. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 

J. T. DORAIS, 

School Instructor. 



state of education. 

Cannot read 86 

Can read only 50 

Can read and write . 221 

Total 357 



library return. 

Number of volumes in library 3,944 

" added during the year 51 

" convicts who have used books 298 

Total number of issues during the year 30,992 

" outlay for the year $24 93 



SCHOOL INSTRUCTORS' REPORTS 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



75 



DORCHESTER. 

Dorchester, X.B., July 1, 1005. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit my annual report of the school and library in 
this penitentiary for the year ended June 30, 1905. 

At the beginning of the year the school was attended by forty-five pupils. 
The present attendance is thirty-seven, divided as follows : — 

Reading, writing and arithmetic 15 

Reading and writing 10 

Reading only 12 

Five men reading in the fourth English reader, six in the third, ten in the second, 
seven in the first, and nine in the primers. 

The conduct of the pupils and their application were satisfactory. 

I beg to tender my sincere thanks to my superiors for the assistance given me in 
the discharge of my duties. 

T have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

G. B. PAPESTEAU. 

School Instructor. 



LIBRARY RETURNS. 



Total 

Xumber 

of Volumes 

in 

Library. 



Xumber 

added during 

the 

Year. 



General library 595 

Roman Catholic library 278 

Protestant library 103 



976 



20 



20 



Average 

Xumber of 

Convicts 

using Books. 



Total 

Xumber of 

issues during 

the Year. 



ISO 
45 
46 



9.360 
1.170 
1,196 



11,726 



STATE OF EDUCATION. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




Cannot read 


20 

22 

180 


2 

1 
8 


22 


Can read only 


23 


Can read and write 


]ss 








222 


11 


233 



76 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



MANITOBA. 

Stont Mountain, July 1, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit my thirteenth annual report of the school of 
this penitentiary, for the year ended June 30, 1905. 

Thirty-six pupils were enrolled during the year, classified as to nationalities, as 
follows : — English half-breed, 2 ; French half-breed, 5 ; Galician, 9 ; Polish, 5 ; 
German, 4 ; Hungarian, 3 ; Indian, 4 ; French, 2 ; Negro, 1. 

Of' this number, 11 had to learn the alphabet, 7 knew the alphabet only, 8 were 
able to read in the first reader, 6 in the second reader and 4 in the third reader. 

The average daily attendance was a little over 14, and the present one 13, divided 
as follows :— 

First reader, .part first 4 

First reader, part second 6 

Second reader, spelling and arithmetic 3 

Good progress was made during the year, especially by the foreigners who are 
taking a keen interest in their studies, and are very anxious to learn the English 
language. 

I beg to express my thanks to my superiors for the assistance given me in the 
discharge of my duties. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Tour obedient servant, 

J. O. BEATJPRE, 

School Instructor. 



STATE OF EDUCATION. 

Can read and write English 127 

and French 7 

German 3 

Hungarian 2 

Galician 1 

" Danish 3 

Norwegian 2 

German only 3 

French only 3 

Galician only 2 

Polish only 4 

only English 6 

" French 2 

Cannot read or write 25 

Total 190 



SCHOOL INSTRUCTORS' REPORTS 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

LIBRARY RETURNS. 



77 




Number of 
Convicts 

using books. 



Circulation. 



General library 

Protestant librarv 

Roman Catholic librarv 



234 
109 



12,659 
1,472 



BEITISH C0LU1EBIA. 



New Westminster, July 1, 1905. 
Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit my annual report of the school of this peni- 
tentiary for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1905. 

Ten convict? were admitted to the school during: the year, and the average daily 
attendance 21. 

Of the ten convicts admitted to the school 6 were put in the first primer, 4 in the 
third reader. I have in attendance 27 pupils classified as follows: — 

Reader part 2nd 6 

Second reader and spelling 2 

Third reader and spelling 10 

Arithmetic only 3 

Writing only 6 

Seventy-five are supplied with school books and elates, to study in their 
I am pleased to state that good progress was made by pupils attending school, and 
their conduct has been most satisfactory. 

Owing to the crowded state of the prison, I have been unable to hold school for 

part of the year, as the school room had to be used for a dormitory, and is still so 

occupied. I will be able to continue the school as soon as the new wing is completed. 

In conclusion, I thank my superiors for the assistance given me in the discharge 

of my duties. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Tour obedient servant, 

W. J. CAEEOLL, 

School Instructor. 



78 



DEPARTUEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



STATE OF EDUCATION. 



Can read and write in English. . 

Japanese. 

Greek. . . 

French. . 

Chinese. . 

Italian. . 

Slavonic. 

Can read only in English 

" " Greek 

Cannot read or write. 



99 
3 

1 
1 
6 
3 
1 
3 
1 
21 



LIBRARY RETURN. 



139 



Total Number 
of Volumes 
in Library. 



Number of 

Convicts 
using Books. 



Circulation. 



General 1,486 

Protestant 214 

Roman Catholic 181 



12S 
S 
8 



9,132 
35S 
369 



H. McESE, 

Librarian. 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX F. 

MATRONS' REPORTS. 



79 



5-6 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



A. 1906 



Kingston, June 30, 1905. 
Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 

Sirs. — I have the honour to submit my annual report of the female prison for the 
year ending June 30, 1905. There are at present 7 women in this institution. 

There was 1 pardoned, 1 sent to asylum, 2 paroled, 3 discharged and 3 received.- 
The industry of the women has been fairly satisfactory, and their conduct, with 
two exceptions, has been good. 

R. A. FAHEY. 

Matron. 



Return" of Work done in Female Prison for Tear ending June 30. 1905. 



Xumber 

of 
Articles. 




Equal 

to 
Days. 


Rate 
per day. 


Amount. 


Total. 






Work done for Male Prison. 


cts. 


S cts. 


S cts. 


$ eta. 



441 
147 
767 
723 
443 
127 
20 
S4 



[Shirts 

Pairs socks. . . 

Towels 

Handkerchiefs . 
Pillowslips . . . , 

Sheets 

Bed-ticks 

Bandages 



Customers laundry- 



Work for Female Prison. 



Making clothing. &c. . 
Washing, cooking, &c. 



441 
294 
64 
70 
55 
31 
10 
7 



39 

1.474 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



88 20 

58 SO 

12 SO 

14 00 

11 00 

6 20 

2 00 

1 40 




7 80 
294 SO 



194 40 

7S 00 



304 60 



577 00 



DORCHESTER 

Dorchester, July 3, 1905. 
To the Warden. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my annua] report of this department, for the 
year ended June 30, 1905. 

On June 30, 1904, there were 12 female prisoners. Since then; 4 have been r.-ceived, 
2 discharged and 3 paroled, leaving 11 at present in this institution. 

I am pleased to state that the conduct of the female prisoners, generally, was very 
good, and their industry satisfactory. 

Yours respectfully. 

E. Mi \IAI1"N. 

M a I ion. 
34—6 81 



82 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1905 
Keturn'oI" Work done in Female Prison. 




Work done for Male Prison. 



205 Pairs socks 

98 " mittens 

811 " socks repaired 

224 Sheets 

313 Towels : 

12 Pillowslips 

Table linen lor dining hall 

I.inen for chapel . . ., 

Knitting for officials (revenue) . 

Washing for officials (revenue) . 



Work for Female Prison. 



Clothing for female convicts. . . . 

Bedding, &c 

Outfits for discharged prisoners. 
Washing, cooking, *&c 



410 

98 

540 

56 

34 

4 

40 

S 



1 1 . 

60 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
2ii 
20 
20 



$ cts. 

S2 00 

19 60 

108,00 

11 20 

6 SO 

80 

S 00 

1 60 

90 

4 80 



20 


7 SO 


20 


3 20 


20 


12 00 




218 60 







$ cts. 



243 70 



241 60 
485 30 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX G 



CRIME STATISTICS. 



34— I 



f-6 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



A. 1906 



KINGSTON. 

MOVEMENT OF CONVICTS. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 
















437 
136 


11 
3 


448 


Received since — 

" other penitentiaries 


133 
3 


1 
2 


134 
5 


139 


Discharged since — 


s:i 

14 

27 

6 

1 

1 


3 
1 
2 

1 


86 

15 

29 

6 

2 

1 


573 

132 


14 

7 


587 


" pardon 

" death 

" transfer to other penitentiaries. . . . 
" " to asylums, 58 Vic. c. 41. 
62-3 Vic, c. 4S, s. 7. . . 








139 












441 


7 


448 











ST. YIXCEXT DE PAUL. 

MOVEMENT OF CONVICTS. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 














365 

136 






134 

1 


..... 
















135 


1 






87 
is 
33 

I 

2 


1 


501 


Discharged during the year — 


144 










" death ... 








" transfer to Kingston 






143 


1 


144 




357 











35 



86 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



DOKCHESTEE. 

MOVEMENT OF CONVICTS. 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



Male. Female. Total. 



Male. Female. Total. 



Remaining at midnight, June 30, 1904. 
Received since — 

From common jails 

" other penitentiaries 

" forfeiture of license 

" military prison 



Discharged since — 

By expiration of sentence 

" pardon 

" parole 

" transfer to other penitentiaries. 
" order of court 



Remaining at midnight, June 30, 1905. 



23S 

SS 

1 
2 



■ 



40 
1 



12 



250 



92 
1 



(.7 



43 
1 



338 



116 



222 



16 



11 



354 



121 



233 



MANITOBA. 
MOVEMENT OF CONVICTS. 

Remaining at midnight, June 30, 1904 156 

Eeceived since — 

From common jails (including 1 female) 104 

One female convict transferred from Kingston peni- 
tentiary to Selkirk Asylum 1 

105 

261 

Discharged since — 

By expiration of sentence 40 

" pardon 11 

" parole 14 

" death 2 

* " escape 2 

" transfer to lunatic asylum, Selkirk 1 

" transfer to Kingston Penitentiary (female) 1 

71 

Remaining at midnight, June 30. 1905 L90 

• One recaptured. 



CRIME STATISTICS 87 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

MOVEMENT OF CONVICTS. 

In custody at midnight June 30, 1904 109* 

Received since — 

From common jails 59 

168 
Discharged since — 

By expiration of sentence 17* 

" paroled T 

" pardoned 1 

" death 1 

" returned to provincial authorities 2f 

" removed by order of court 1 

29 

Remaining at midnight, June 30, 1905 139 



This includes one convict in provincial Hospital for the Insane. 
f One returned to provincial reformatory. ' 



88 



DEPART11EXT OF JC&TICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



f. 

< 

H 

H 
K 

«! 

Ph- 

- 

o 

33 

H 
U 

M 
> 
55 

o 
o 

o 

H 
55 

w 

g 

> 
o 







Daily 

Aver- 
age. 




s 


1- 


?1 l- c "-2 

3 2 £ w 


r~ 


~. t-~ 1Q i* 




- c 

111 


l«l°X 


btOHiocNOonooao 
?l C — C t- r: 3 -— -r -r -f 
io co o to *o *o »c r 




•apjmaj 


1- -^ Ji - ~ — L- .* ~ — t^ 




•ai^W 


X 3 
— r- 


"y: t~- 10 re 


— l- c t 1 

-- -t re ro ^ 










00 

a 
o 

K 

s 
o 

ID 

5 


- 


•i e: » o x 


— .- r. cc — ri y: r: -. ~ r: 
ri ri — — -■ 




• ajuiuaj 


l~ c c o -~ — l- c l- o t>- 




■>I B M 


~ '- r. — ~ — re i - — — ri 

?> w i- ^r.'zi-T-r?; 




■snmjjCsy 


• apjraaj 










: : : 




■ap3p[ 










• • «r-t 




^jno^ jo japao 
Aq paAOtua^j 


■apK 






N. 




rtrtH • 




sauBijnai 
-ra'aj' jaq^O 


•aiBH 




?l 71 c 


-N«K« 




SadlJJS^ 


3[B W 


n^M;i ■ 








o» paturuay 


0p3 K 
























310JBJ 


■ apjuia j 






• ?> 














S>- 


ap3 K 






I 














SMJBSa 


■ apjuiaj 






a 








M 


■ajBjq 


eoioca-^tocoeotOi-Hcoco 






■snopj«<j 


• aiuuiaj 


CO • -Mr* . -M^C^rt 




■ap3 K 


r. •- ': r :i ■- ■- ioO(S^ 
— -i -i ?i n ri — — — -h 




•aouajuag 

}0 AJldxjf 


• ap3013j[ 


?i c r re i — " ri — -r r; 




a[T! K 


3>OeOCO-4*CQQ00003QG 




X 

Z 



7. 

r 

s 
a 
< 


'l B l°X 


— - 


■ - — c ~ i - i - ? i ■ - ~ 










•ajBuiajj 


— — 




arm. 


r - 
• - 


~ i- ?i ■- s. — - — — 






• 




1 

- 

H 




- 

4 


r 
•i 
X 


1X00-07 

1897-98 

1899-00 


1900-0 J 

[901-02 

190243 

1903-04 

1904-05 



CRIME STATISTICS 



89 



SESSIONAL PAPEP No. 34 



[- T. ?> — ~ '-- -* EC — '" 
33l,J9A\ A]IBQ ;- -- _ _ -r -f ■-_ -- ~- r - 



'JB3^ 

jo pua atp ib Suuiii:m.n{ 



~- ffl DC t~ P3 "X »-* l- Ifl t- 

.-.,,,..- z ~ — — — — ■* n o o 



S 

o 



■IB»°X 



ajBuraj 



SPK 



H 


71 
- 


— 


n 


10 




a 




m 


— 


L- 


- 


re 


- 


- 


^P 


;e> 


« 


N 


— • 


el 


M 


5 


■M 
I- 


LO 


CS 


to 




M 


CO 
-t 



^JIlOQJOJSpJO 

Aq pasea]a}£ 



•■3TBK 



•sauspuai 
-IU0J jaqto 
oj pjajajsuEax 



'sadeosg 



•apjutaj 



CO.*-ti-I^COCO«iH 



■apjjV 



mcotoo.oo'Oi-"'*t~« 



•aiBK 



■SHJB3Q 



'a|OJB,£ 



•paaopjEj 



•aanaju ag 
}0 nOpBJldxy 



a[B W 



3 l E K 



a[E rc 



- 


N 


" 


— 


[»3 


t 


m 


- 


M 


■M 










X 

M 


— 


s. 


z 

n 


PC 




2 


1- 


i" 


N 


h- 


— 


ei 


~ 


'" 


*QC 



'•'I' : K ~ Z Z ^ 



1"WJ. 



"apjjra I 


L~ 


- 


M 


- 


~ 


t 


re 


f 


- 


- 


v, l t: IV 


'" 


£ ' 


^2 


— 


7. 


-£ 


s 


s 


N 


re 



'93UUIJU01 

-i'HH.»|m "'' :iv 

■.Vl.Ui:nu..|.ljj '3pjJ^ 

apsiuaj 



fh m i-i in 



|n:c aotntuoQ 



'" - K — — 1- re t — — 



■aiB M 



'I Alllr 'ApoisnD itr r. /: - — -r c — — re -^ 



- 
r. 


= 


- 


ei 


■-. 


X 

r. 
r 




= 


- 


5. 



90 



DEPARTltEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



a 

r- 
00 
H 
= 
- 
K 

- 





'dStua 


Ay a'iiuh 


— X 1- — 

qo x — re 

« — ci ci 


- - 
CI — 
CI CI 


N 


Cl -T '-CJ 
Cl Cl tN 




>aa iBgaiu|T;in3y 


- l«l°X 


(N oo o t= 

~ - "i ci 

— — Cl O) 


■* o 
c; — 

Cl C-l 


O 


t» = cc 

CO M3 03 
CM tN Cl 


JB3^ JO 


' 3[Bin3 j; 


■* 


lO L- — 


■— s. 


10 


CS c- 


^H 




ap! K 


a 




K - ci 

CS Cl N 
— CM CN 


A Cl 

r: z. 

— Cl 




x a 

CI c 


CM 




"3 


'pn°X 


ii3 O 
10 C" 


— 


re — 

= A. 


^ 


A 


! 


IN 




• apraa.j 






CS 


X 




— i 


r^ 


t-i <N 


"O 




3 I"K 


If 


- 


CS •£ 


:-. z. 
- A 


r. 


IC 00 o 

x en — ■ 

iH 




•S3UCIJ 

-uajraad JaijJO 


•apsM 






Cl 






ri 


X 


fH 




jjnoo jo Japjo 
Aq paAOuiajj 


•3[« K 
















i^ 


IO 


to 


adBDsg 


3[T1 K 




c 










_ 








•tucaa 


• apraa j 












— 






apj W 


! 


- 


,_ 


" 


i- 


A 


: " 


— c 






O 
K 
< 

7 


•noissrrapB no 
'[lEfojpanjinsy 


■aXBK 
























- 
• 


JlOJiy 


• 9]BUI3 4 




















03 


->I' : IV 




■ 






~1 — 


M 


re c 


T 


•nopjBj 


■ ^"R 


- 


« 


c 


1- 


<-. A 


— 


i- 




IO 


aouajnas 

(O Xaidxji 


'0|EUI0J 






c 


M 






■ - 




t> 


M 


■t-k 




3 


IT 


C» 
A 


L" 


X 


= 


- 


c 


U3 
CO 




"5 

.0 


"l B »°X 


J 


X 


A 
c 


— < 


A 


A. 


CO 


: 


r- 


O 


■ • I ' ■' " ' - ' I 


C 


ON 


- 


CM 


C 


:: 


-r 


« 


■-- 


■* 




•a[B K 




- 


5 


A. 

- 


P 


A. 


Cl 


A 

a c 




crj 
Z 


OICUBJ 

jo wtvjrajJOj 


>\'-l\ 










" 


~ 






« 


o 

CO 


SaUBl} 










CI 


— 


' H 


S 




•umjA'sy aansuj 


••M"IV 






: 






— 










•nostjj A.n:ji[i|^ 


■'l'"K 


^ 


i-~ 


"3 

— 


— 


« 


>-"i 


/• 


t 


0> 




•S|ref uoimn. ■ , 


..[■■in., | 


n 





c 

-* 

r 


cc 

- 


c 

A 

1- 


7 


— 


i- 


'- 


— 


■.,|,: K 


- 
i- 


1- 


- 


- 


2 


A 

c 

IO 

M 




>. 
■a . 

c. - 

5 = 


•|' ; I".I. 


X 


c_ 


A 

r 


U3 

CI 

d 


c" 
c 


— 

0) 


oi 


i- 

c 
c 


M 

t> 
* 








- 


■ - 


'C 




"~ 


A. 

Cl 
Cl 


o 

• 


a 

IN 


Cl 

•^ 

A 
01 




Vi 


1 
> 


£ 


r 


CI 


- 
- 
c 


— 






r 


a 

i~ 

s 

A. 


A 


r 
> 


— 


Cl 


r 


- 
5 


I- 

- 

5 





— £ 



CRIME STATISTICS 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



91 







■no;jBindo,j A"[ti!Q 


aSBJBAy 













0! 

c 


c 

Ol 


1" 


1^ 








•juax jo pus in Sumreuiay 


oc 




X 


Ol 









C£> 
LO 







1 UNCHARGES. 


"5 
o 
h 


■jmox 


c 

co 


IN 


1< 

IN 


IN 


■* co 




CO 


a 

0-. 


i^ 




• apsuiaj 




- 






n 


- 




•arejxr 


c 
co 


* 

O) 


— 



-* 


re CO 




CO 

"11 




- 




•m<«a 


-3 I«M 




- 


~ 


~ 


: - 


- 


- 


CO 


01 




•aiojuj 


•arejs 










Ol 


•— 


\D 





-T 




•adeosg; 


■si»K 










IN 






01 


A 




UIU|A-y 

apuan-j oj iaag 


•ai^w 
















~ 




S3U«I1 

-ue4iuaj j9q;o 
04 p.uajsuvjj. 


■ ajBuiaj 










<-« 






01 


— 






■a\v K 






T— 


i-H 


— ' 


.-H 


1- 






Pardon. 


OIBJV 


01 


M 


co 


!C 


00 CO 
• 


t^ 


■* 


a 


~ 




•8au34nog 

jo Ajidxg 


•»i b w 


0) 


Ol 


a 

— 


1- 


<D LO 
— 01 


Ol 


co 


CO 





■< 

m 
o 


Admissions. 


"3 


•pjjox 


t 


0- 


r 


x ** u: 

"!• CO -tf 


>0 
co 


X 






— 


< 


• 3fBtn3jJ 










- 






01 


01 




•'I'M 


t 


if 
p 




-J 


CO 1" 
CO -7 


co 




CO 


CO 




•pajU4dB.)oy 


■•V'K 






^ • -1 






01 




• 

souEi}ua4iua c £ aai[40 






C 


— 


• 
• 






— < 

* 




■S[ref uomuioQ 


■ airauiaj 






— 






Ol 


— 




■*\m 


1 


if 




c 




c 

C 


— If 

co ■<( 


it 


3t 

1^ 




CO 






I A'lrif Xpojsno ui 





c 
a 




■J 

■J 




1- 


*r 


c 


ID 






i 

> 




u 

c 
-J 


t 

: 
j 


1 

c 
j 


z 

1 
z 
J 


7 r 


p 


V 






1 

- 


1 





92 



DE FARTHEST OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



a 
S 
2 
h) 
O 

O 





•a^EjaAy A[iB(j 


tr 2 




5 eo eo co t~ e 


- 01 


oi 






In Custody 

:it end of 
Year. 


•pn°x 


'-lOOiOTfi-.-tiCCl 


© 
rt 






• afBuiaj 


























■ajBH 


•£ Z S. = rt ~ <* iq C5 
OOOOSOOC50SO 

rt -h rH — — — 


05 

rt 






r. 
*> 

O 
7-i 


"1WL 




Oi 
01 






• ap^uia^j 








01 


> ex 












•apjv* 


rtrtTOrtTT^c? 


31 
01 






jjnoj jo JapJO 
Aq paAOUiay 


•ajtijAT 




-i 




— 01 


tH 






sauBpaajraSjj 
iatjjo oj jtios 


• ajBraa j 






01 


01 






•ap: K 






-tf 113 

~H i-H 


01 01 






00 


•a[OjB,j 


■apspj 












c 


a i-O 33 


I*- 




DlSCHARG 


S[lBf (BIjaiAOjy 

oj pananjay 


■apjpj 


















01 

* 




■pad-Basg 


apijv; 






















■um[Aicy oi jims 


•apjjV 


• 


















'l»i : -'(I 


•>1< ; K 


















01 


" 




appmg 


■3JBJ, 










^* 










■nopj.: a a h 


■ apsuia .] 










,H 




- 








a I E J*I 


cs 


- 


C 




-o 


— 


X 


n 


^ 






■aouajuag jo 
lI01}BJ[ilx':[ A([ 


•'l' : K 


r 


— 

rt 


C-l 


-f 


Ol 


f. 

01 








IN 

01 


t~ 






"3 


•.ip:uia.( 


rt 

rt 


rt 




rt 


10 


t 


K 

rt 


X 


5 


c; 


i 


IONS. 






01 














•>1' : K 


rt 
rt 


rt 




K 






rt 
rt 


/ 


3 






•jjno.) jo rapj< , 

A(| p.HIIH i .;| 


■M'MV 






01 






" 










03 

s 


'p.l.ltll'lK .>.l}| 


•, M i:U 












" 






i 


4j 


31 11:1 ill.. 1 1 < I >,| 131] l( 1 














t<- 


> 
- 




s i™r 

tllllimili,) in,,, | 












03 










,o 






■M'-K 


rt 
rt 


rt 


r 
,o 


- 

00 


- 


SI 


Ol 

rt 




= 


s 




I A|U|' 'A| 


ijsn; i m| 


- 

3 

X 


r 


v 


s 




- 
o 

— 


— 


T 


■0 

c-. 




5 

1 

r 

s 

- 

• 




i 


X 
/ 


-- 


5 

5 


?l 

-r 


rt 

T 
~J 

a 


— 
rt 

5 


1* 

5 



CRIME STATISTICS 



93 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



EECOMMITMEXTS. 



KINGSTON. 



Name. 



il 



Crime. 



Where Sentenced. Date. 



Term. 



G. F. Carey 1 

Owen MeCann .... 1 

Edw. Burns 1 

C. Storms 3 

G. Cousins 1 

Harry .May 1 

S. Spencer 1 

C. X. Johnston .... 1 
Edw. Wilson 1 

D. Bellair 1 

Wm. Bell 1 

J. Mulhall 1 

C. Higgins 1 

1 T. Murray 3 

W. Flagler 1 

I. Lottridgi' 2 

Jas. Brooks 1 

Jas. Moore 1 

Jno. Doyle 3 

Jno. Letter 1 

Jas. McGlade 1 

Hy. Phillips 1 

Jno. Sanford 2 

Jos. Clement 1 



Theft and having offensive 

weapons 

Burglary 

Horsestealing, theft, &c 

Horsestealing 

kBurglarv 

Theft. ." 

Stealing 

Horsestealing 

Abduction 

Stealing a coat 

Theft 

Theft 

Counterfeiting 

Shooting with intent 

Shopbreaking and stealing. . 

Horsestealing 

Forgery 

Breaking into with intent. . . 

Burglary 

iig 

Stealing 

Stealing 

Making false document . . . . 
Shopbreaking and stealing. . 



. St. Thomas ,1904— Aug. 

. Sandwich 1904 — Aug. 

Windsor 1904 — Aug. 

. Belleville 1904 — Aug. 

. Hamilton 1904 — Sept. 

Toronto 1904 — Oct. 

. London 1904 — Nov. 

Windsor 1904 — Dec. 

Cavuga 1904 — Dec. 

. Chatham 1904 — Dec. 

Toronto 1904 — Dec. 

Toronto 1904 — Dec. 

Toronto 1904 — Dec. 

Windsor 1905— Feb. 

. Toronto 1905— Feb. 

. Ottawa 1905 — March 

Woodstock 190.5 — April 

Toronto 190.5 — April 

London 1905 — April 

I Ittawa 1905 — April 

St. Catharines 1905 — May 

St. ( atharines 1905 — May 

Kingston 1905 — June 

Ottawa 1905 — June 



9 . vears. 

13 2 

12 3 

18 .". 

13 5 
7 5 



8 3 

13 3 

20 3 

:;i .-. 

31 5 

31 7 

16 20 



20 4 

10 7 

13 4 

13 3 

17 7 

_'7 2 

20 5 

20 5 
17 Hi 

21 5 



RECAPITULATION. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 






.7 1 

52 

111 

4 

1 


5 

1 
1 


379 


" 2nd " 


53 


" 3rd " 


11 


" 4th " 


4 


" sth " 




1 








1 otal 


441 


11 


44S 







94 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



f , 



Name 



a a 

s 






Where Sentenced. Date. 



Term. 



Bourque, Joseph . . . 
Beauvais. F. Xavier 
Blanehette., Eusebe. 
Chevaher, Adolphe 

Chamberlain, Adol 



Dunn, Joseph .... 
Davidson, Edward 
Demers Adelard . . 

Dore, Joseph 

Desjardins, Alpli.. 
Forest, Thomas . . 
Giroux. Edouard. . 
Kingsberry, Marcel 
Langlois, Johnny. 
Larivee, Joseph . 
Leblanc, Omer . . 
L'Heureux, Wm. 
Lamarche, Henri 
Lavallee. Albert . 
Leblanc, Charles. 
Mooney, .Tame- - 
Morrier. Louis. . . 
McGregor. Wm. . 
Olsen. Albert . . . 
Pelletier. Frank.. 
Plante, Louis . . . 
Swilton, John. . . 
Sterling. William . 
Vaillancourt, X. 
Molleur, Jules . . . 



1 Theft from the person 

3 Shop breaking 

1 Theft. 

1 Obtaining goods on false pre- 

tenses 

2 Obtaining money on false pre- 

tense 

2 Shopbreaking 

1 Housebreaking 

1 Theft 

2 Theft 

3 Theft from the person 

1 Attempt to rob 

2 Theft 

1 Attempt to commit murder.. . 

1 Theft and wound 

2 Theft from the person 

2 Theft 

1 Highway robbery with viol'ce 

1 Theft and housebreaking .... 

3 Wounding with intent 

1 Theft 

1 Theft 

4 Theft 

2 Theft 

1 Housebreaking 

2 Theft from the person. 

3 Theft 

1 Theft from dwelling ho\ise. . . 

3 Arson 

1 Receiving stolen property.. . . 

1 Theft :... . 



Montreal 1904: — Oct. 1 1 

Montreal 1904 — Nov. 29 

Rimouski 190.3 — March 22 



4 years. 
3 

s 



Montreal 1905 — March 9 2 



< Ittawa 190.5— Ma v 9 

Montreal 1904 — ( >ct. 4 

Montreal *1904 — Nov. 11 

Iberville 11905 — Jan. 11 

Montreal 190.")— April 1 

Montreal 1905 -April 1 

Montreal 1905 — June 15 

Montreal 1905— June 29 

Pontiac 1905— June 26 

Ottawa 1904— Sept. 26 

Montreal 1904— Oct. 3 

Montreal 1904— lie,-. 13 

St. Francis 1905 — Jan. 14 

Montreal 1905— Feb. 23 

Richelieu !l905 — May 22 

Montreal 1905 — June 7 

Montreal 1901 — Dec. 20 

Montreal 1905 — April 20 

Montreal 1905 — Jan. 19 

Montreal 1904— Nov. 11 

Montreal L905- -March 16 

Quebec 1905 — April 19 

Montreal 1904 — Aug. 23 

St. Francis 1905— June 19 

Montreal 1905— April 1 

Montreal 1905— June 13 



21 

3" 

5 

4 

5 

3 

:s 

4 

7 

21 

4 

4 



RECAPITULATION. 



Convict- serving 1st term in penitentiary 244 



2nd 

3rd 

III, 
5th 

6th 



64 
26 

15 

7 
1 



Total. 



357 



CHIME -STATISTICS 



95 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 3+ 



DORCHESTER. 



Name. 






Where Sentenced. 



Date. 



Term. 



Jas. White 2 

Alt'. Slaunwhite ... 1 
F. McGillvery alias 

Frank Izzard. ... 1 

Jno. Nicholson .... 1 

Andrew Griswold. . 3 

Robt. Barker .... 1 

Vital Bourgeois ... 2 

Murdock Cameron . . 1 

Ed.fConnors 1 

Robt. Rogers 1 

Henry- Palmer .... 1 

H. Briggs 1 

Jno. Brodrick alias 

Jno. Burns 

William Smith alias 

Jos. Breen. . . 
Lemuel Ingles. . 



Wounding with intent Halifax. 

Wounding with intent Halifax. 



1904— Julv 
1904— Julv 



7 2 rears. 
7 2'" 



Breaking, entering & stealing 
Breaking, entering and steal'g 
Breaking, entering, stealing 

and arson 

Stealing 

Stealing 

Stealing 

Breaking, entering & stealing. 

Stealing 

Jail breaking 

Causing grivious bodily harm. 1 



Inverness . 
Inverness . 



1904— Julv 28 
1904— July 28 



Halifax 

King's, N.B.. . . 
Westmorland. . 

Pictou 

Halifax 

Pictou 

P.E.I. 
Westmorland. . 



1904— Nov. 
1904— Nov. 
1 91 14 — Dec. 
19(14— Nov. 
1 '"'I— Dec. 
Mar. 
1905 -Jan. 
1905— May 



4 Rape Truro 

2 Stealing horse and carriage. . . Cumberland. 
3 ealing Halifax. . . . 



Jan.. 8 Life. 

1905 — June 21 2 years. 
1905— June 27 S " " 



MANITOBA. 



Name. 






- atenced. 



Date. 



Term . 



W. Lavallee 

George Brown . . . . 
George T. Ham. . . . 
"Taking Married". 

P. Burrell 

A. Marcotte 

Albert E. Clarke . . 
Thomas Allen 



"Sun Calf" 

M. Briscbois 

Ernest Therriault. . 

James Stone 

It. Williams 

R. Williams alias C. 
White 

C. Anderson 

T. C. Collins j 

John W. Houle. . . . i 
Geo. Desgagniers . . 
Louis Sansregret . . 
Joseph Manlcy alia 

Taylor. Healy, &c 

James Pelter alias 

Hill, Edward, &c. 

Wm. Morrison alias 

Devlin 

Isadore Nickel .... 
Albert Carr 

D. Etienne 



Winnipeg 

Winnipeg 

Winnipeg 

McLeod. Alberta. . . 

Winnipeg 

Maple Creek. Alta 
Winnipeg 



Robberv 

Theft. 

Theft 

Hores stealing 

Forgerv and uttering 

Theft.". 

Theft 

Stealing; i attempt to escape 

from X.W.M.P 

31 ealing 

Theft 

Stealing money and breaking 

jail 

Theft 

Shop breaking and theft ...... 



Shop breaking and theft Calgary, Alta 

Burglary Winnipeg 

Winnipeg 

Robbery Winnipeg 

Theft Winnipeg 

Horse stealing Moosoniin. N.W.T 



Nov. 


17 


3i years 


1905 Mar. 


24 


3 " 


1903 — Jan. 


26 


4 " 


1903 Mar. 


9 


3 " 


1903 Sept. 


11 


3 " 


1903— June 


16 


3 " 


1904 April 


S 


3 " 



Moosoniin. N.W.T. 

Calgary, Alta 

Winnipeg 



Prince Albert, 
Winnipeg. . . . 
Calgary. Alta. 



I >ct. 1 2 

i Ian 26 3 

1903— Oct. lei 3 



Sa<k. 



1904 June 
I'.h il -June 
1904— Mav 



10 3 

7 7 

14 3 

I 
14 3 



1904— Mav 
1900— Aug 22 in 
11905— April fi 5 
1902— Feb. 13 5 
1905— Feb. 20 3 
1904— Sept. 13 7 



2 Shop breaking and theft Calgary, Alta 1905— May 31 ."> 

2 Breaking into P.l I., and 9tea 

ing property I Uta. 1905 Jan. lii -' 



2 Shop breaking and theft Winnipeg 1905 Mar. 

1 l hefl Winnipeg 11 

I i eft Winnipeg Vpril 

1 Shop breaking and theft Winnipeg 1904 — Aug. 



i.; 5 
20 2 



Convicts serving 1st time in Penitentiary 166 

Convict -nd time in I ary 16 

Convict Ird time in Penitentiary 8 



mi i 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-5 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



W. Smithson. . . 
Alex or Charley . 

Eneas 

\V. Dooley 

Ling Sing 

Ah Fook 

Mong Kee 

John Campbell. . 
George Brown . . 
J.J. Rogers . . . 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 




Thos. Young 1 



Wounding with intent Vernon 

Murder Vancouver 

Rape Vernon 

Unlawful wounding Xanaimo 

Breaking, entering *fc stealing. New Westminster. . 
Breaking, entering *t stealing. Xew Westminster.. . 

Shop breaking Xew Westminster.. . 

Stealing Vancouver 

Stealing Vancouver 

Obtaining money under false 

pretenses Vancouver 

Breaking, entering & stealing. Victoria 



1901— Mav 
1894— Nov. 
1903— Mav 
1904— Feb. 
1904— Oct 
1904— Oct. 
1904— Dec. 
1905— Jan. 
1905— Jan. 

1905 — Jan. 
1905— Mar. 



15 7 years . 



12 


20 " 


13 10 " 


19 2 


25 


2* " 


31 


5 " 


If. 


6 " 


o 


2 " 


lb 


3* " 


17 


2 " 


13 


3 " 



CRIMIXAL EECOED. 

KINGSTON". 





Terms. 


Peniten- 
tiaries. 


Foreign- 
Prison-. 


Provincial 
Reforma- 
tories. 


Provincial 
Prisons. 


County 
Jails. 




S 


f. 
= 


1 




female. 
l otal 


i i 1 


5 


- 
- 


r. 

O 


6 
"5 

s 


a 

r. 

■I 




Convicts serving. 


1st . . 

2nd. . 
3rd. . 
4th... 
5th... 


374 




379 

53 
11 

4 


2 . 


? 


39 




39 








it 


52 1 

in 1 

4 






15 ... . 15 

1 . .. . 1 

2 2 

1 1 


1 




1 


tt 












tt 














tt 














a 


8th... 




1 


44S 


















2 


2 














441 


7 




10 


S8 . 58 


1 




1 



ST. VIXCKNT DE PAUL. 



Convicts serving. 


1st . . 

2nd. . 
3rd... 
4th... 
5th... 
6th... 


J II 




214 
64 
26 

15 

7 
1 


23 




93 




• 






72 
44 
18 

8 
7 
3 
2 
I 




72 


64 

26 

i.-. 

i 














44 


















is 


tt 


















-- 


a 




















(i 












3 


.. 


















•» 


tt 
























1 


tt 


loth... 






















5 


tt 
























l 


1 


tt 


16th... 




















1 
1 
1 




1 


tt 






















1 


tt 


30th... 


:::: 


















1 


























357 




::.-,7 23 




- 












164 


.... 164 























CRIME .STATISTICS 



97 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



DORCHESTER. 



Peniten- 
tiaries. 



Foreign 
Prisons. 



Terms. 



£ a 

~ Z 



Provincial 
Reforma- 
tories. 



•a 

= 



Provincial 
Prisons. 



fa 



County 
Jails. 



Convicts serving 



1st . 
2nd. 
3rd.. 
4th.. 
5th.. 
6th.. 
8th. 



173 
34 

11 
3 

1 



10 

1 



222 



II 



183] 

35 

11 

3 

1 



233 



3 17 
1 .... 
3 



20 



20 



11 



11 71 
3 11 
13 

1 4 



15 108 



73 

11 

13 

4 



2 110 



MANITOBA. 



Convicts serving. 


1st . . 
2nd. . 
3rd... 


165 
16 

8 


1 


166 
16 

8 


1 





1 


2 




2 


1 




1 


12 
5 
8 




12 
5 


« 




















8 


























189 


1 


190 


1 




1 


2 




2 


1 




1 


25 




25 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Convicts serving. 


1st . . 
2nd. . 
3rd.. . 


128 
9 
2 




128 
9 
2 






















' 


" 
























a 


















































139 




139 















































34—7 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



WHERE SENTENCED. 

KINGSTON. 



Count v. 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Algoma, District of 

Brant 

Carleton 

DufTerin 

Essex 

Elgin 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haldimaud 

Halton 

Huron 

Hastings 

Kent 

Lennox and Addington 

Lanark 

Lincoln 

Lambton 

Leeds and C'.renville 

Manitoulin. District of 

Muskoka 

Middlesex 

Northumberland and Durham .... 

Nipissing, District of 

Oxford 

Ontario 

Parry Sound 

Prescott and Russell 

Prince Edward 

Peterboro 

Peel 

Renfrew 

Rainy River, District of 

Simcoe ■ • 

Stormont. Dundas and Glengarry. . 

Thunder Bay District of 

Victoria 

Wentworth 

Waterloo 

Wellington 

Welland 

York 

Halifax. N.S 

Cumberland, N.S 

Sydney, N.S 

Queen's, N.S 

Charlottetown, I'Ti.I 

St. John. N.B 

Montreal. Que 

District of Pontiac, Que 

Sweetsburg. Que. 

Quebec, Que 

ArthabaskavUle, Que 

Winnipeg, Manitoba 

Brandon, Manitoba 

Eastern Judicial District, Manitoba 

Mi- leod, Aha 

Vorkton, Vssa 

Dawson City, Yukon 

Cariboo, B.C 

Lytton, H.C 

Col, leu, B.C , 

New Westminster, B.C 

Total 



13 

2 

20 

1 

19 

10 

9 

1(1 

7 

1 

4 

5 

17 

7 

2 

4 

9 

4 



15 
4 
10 

9 

n 
4 
1 
1 
5 
4 

1(1 
1 
7 

14 

20 
4 

21 
9 

11 
6 

93 



1 

1 

1 

13 

1 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 
I 

l 
l 
l 
l 
l 
1 



441 



13 
■j 

21 

1 
19 

in 
(P 
10 

I 

1 
4 
5 

IN 

7 
2 
4 
9 
4 



IS 

4 
10 
'.I 
6 
4 



1 

•,i-l 



lis 



CRIME STATISTICS 



99 



SESSIONAL PAPER No 34 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



County or District. 


Male. 


County or District. 


Male. 


Arthabaska 

Beauhamois 

Bedford . . 


1 
3 
17 
1 
1 
4 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
213 
3 
3 


Ottawa 

Richelieu 


12 
3 

'C, 








3 




3 






°3 




1 






s 




Total . 


4 




o 




11 


McLeod (Fort) 






3.17 









DORCHESTER. 



Province. 



County. 



Xova Scotia . . 



Annapolis 

Antigonish 

Cumberland . . 

Colchester 

Cape Breton. . . 

Uigby 

Guvsboro 

Halifax 

Hants 

Inverness 

King's 

Lunenburg. . . . 

Pietou 

Queen's 

Shelburne 

Victoria 

Yarmouth 



7 
1 

IS 
9 

30 
4 
3 

47 
6 
5 
8 
1 

14 
3 
2 
1 
5 



161 



7 

1 
15 

9 
30 

6 

4 
51 

6 

»l 
1 

15 

3 

2 

1 

5 



169 



Province. 



County. 



-f E 2 



New nrunswick. Gloucester . . 

Kent 

King's 

Restigouche. . 

St. John 

Victoria 

Carleton 

Albert 

Westmorland. 
York 



P. E. Island . 



Queen's. 
Prince. . 



Totals by Pro- 
vinces Xova Scotia 

' Xew Brunswick. 
P. E. Island 
I 'ntario 



1 . 
4 . 
6 . 

4 . 
17 



2 
2 

10 . 

3 

49 

6 . 
5 . . 

11 . . 



1 
4 
6 
4 

17 
1 
3 
2 

10 
4 

52 

6 
5 

11 



161 8 L69 

49 3 52 

11 ... 11 

I .... 1 



222 



1 1 233 



34—7?, 



100 



DEPARTMEM OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1 906 



MANITOBA. 



District. 



No. 



Manitoba — 

Eastern Judicial District 

Central 

Western 
North West Territories — 

Edmonton 

McLeod 

Prince Albert 

Moosomin 

Lethbridge 

Maple Creek 

Yorkton 



72 
2 
3 

S 
20 

4 
15 
10 

7 

2 



District. 



No. 



Calgary 1 

Regina 1 

Fort Saskatchewan 

Carlyle 

Moose Jaw 

Weyburn 

Medicine Hat 

Wetaskewin , 

Cardston 

Whitewood 



Total I 190 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



I district. 




District. 



No. 





3 

I 
8 

1 

1 

7 

13 




11 






IS 






1 




Vancouver 

Total 


34 

S 




23 • 








139 













CRIME STATISTICS 



101 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



CRIMES COMMITTED. 

KINGSTON. 




Abduction 1 

Arson 11 

Aiding to deflower child under 14 

years 

Aggravated robbery 2 

Assault and robbery 7 

Assault and wounding 2 

Assault and escape 1 

Assault with intent to rape 1 

Assault with intent to kill 2 

Assault with intent to rob 6 

Assault and causing bodily harm . . 7 

Attempt to rape 4 

Attempt to break house with intent 3 

Attempt to steal from the person 

Attempt to assist prisoner to 

escape 2 

Attempt to rob and shooting 1 

Attempt to murder 4 

Attempt to shoot and escape 1 

Attempt to murder and rape 1 

Attempt at carnal knowledge of a 

girl under 14 1 

Attempt to utter forged document . 1 

Bringing stolen goods into Canada . 1 

Bigamy and perjury 1 

Breaking, entering and stealing .... 7 

Breaking into church and stealing . 2 

Buggery 9 

Burglary 30 

Burglary and attempt to break 

prison 1 

Burglary and escape 1 

Burglary and shooting with intent . 1 

Burglary and theft 7 

Burglary and attempt to rape 2 

Burglarv, highway robbery and 

theft". ." ". 2 

Burglary, housebreaking and theft . 1 
Carnal knowledge of a girl of 14 

years 

Carnal knowledge of a woman 1 

Causing bodily harm 1 

Causing an explosion, &c 3 

Counterfeiting 2 

Entering house with intent 1 

Forgery 1 .-, 

Forgery and false pretenses 1 



11 



Forgen,' and uttering 

Forging Dominion notes 

Fradulent conversion of property 
Grivious bodily harm and assault 

Gross indencey 

Highway robbery 5 

Housebreaking S 

Housebreaking, stealing and having 

explosives 1 

Housebreaking and stealing 2t> 

Horsestealing lfi 



1 
11 

1 
2 
7 
2 
1 
1 
2 
6 
7 
4 
3 
1 

2 
1 
4 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

9 

30 

1 
1 

1 



11 
1 

1 
3 

2 

1 
15 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
8 

1 
26 
16 



2 
2 
1 

2 

9 

3 

14 

1 
21 



Horsestealing and false pretenses . 

Horsestealing and theft 

Horsestealing and assault 

Having explosives in possession . . 

Incest 

Indecent assault 

Murder 

Making false document 

Manslaughter 

Neglect in child-birth 

Non-support of wife 

Obtaining money under false pre- 
tenses 

Obstructing railway 

Perjury 

Perjury and escape from jail 

Receiving stolen goods 

Robbery 

Robbery with violence 

Robbery and attempt to rape .... 

Robbery and escape 

Rape 

Stopping a mail 

Shooting with intent 

Shoot'ng at railway passenger 
coach 

Shooting and wounding with 
intent 

Shopbreaking 

Shopbreaking and theft 

Shopbreaking, arson and forgerv 

Shopbreaking and shooting police 
officer 

Stealing 

Stealing from the person 

Stealing from the railway 

Stealing cattle 

Stealing from freight car 

Stealing grain 

Stealing post letter 

Stealing with violence 

Stealing and wounding 

Sodomy 

Theft 

Theft from the person 

Theft of cattle 

Theft and escape 

Theft and forgery 

Theft and arson 

Theft and having offensive 
weapons 

Uttering forged document 

Wounding 

Wounding and assault 

Wounding with intent 

Wilfully damaging fire alarm box 

Totals 441 



2 

1 
2 
1 
3 

3 

1 
1 
1 
18 
1 
3 



2 

12 

1 

1 
3S 
9 
2 
3 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
28 
1 



2 
2 
1 
2 
9 
3 

14 
1 

21 
1 
1 

2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
18 
1 
3 



2 

8 

12 

1 

1 
38 
9 
2 
3 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
30 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

2 
2 
1 
3 
1 

lis 



102 



DEPART. \I EXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



ST. TOJCEXT DE PAUL. 



Crime. 



Aggravated assault 

Aggravated robbery 

Attempt to commit theft 

Attempt to commit murder 

Attempt to commit rape 

Attempt to incest 

Attempt to rob 

Assault with intent to wound 

Assault with intent to rob 

Assault and theft 

Arson 

Arson and theft 

Breaking a dwelling house with intent to steal 

Breaking and entering a dwelling house 

Breaking jail 

Burglary 

Bigamy 

Counterfeiting 

Compelling execution of security by force . . . . 

Forgering and uttering 

Forgery and false pretense 

Forgery and assault 

Forgery and theft 

Forgery 

Gross indecency on male person 

Hqusebreaking 

Housebreaking and rape 

Housebreaking and stealing therein 

Horse stealing 

Horse stealing and escape 

Highway robbery with violence 

Indecent assault 

Inflicting grievous bodily harm 

Intent to carnally know girl under 14 years 



Xo. 



3 

8 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
6 
3 
10 
1 
22 
12 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



Crime. 



Intent to displace a switch 

Manslaughter 

Murder 

Obtaining goods under fal5e pretense . 
Obtaining money under false pretense 

Perjury 

Rape . 



Xo. 



Robbery 

Robbery with violence 

Receiving stolen goods 

Seduction 

Stealing with violence and carrying firearms 

Stealing a bicycle 

Shooting with intent to do grievous bodily 

harm 

Shooting with intent to disfigure 

Shop breaking 

Shop breaking and stealing therein 

Theft 

Theft as servant 

Theft with violence 

Theft from a dwelling house 

Theft from employer 

Theft from the person 

Theft of letters containing money 

Theft and escape 

Theft of cattle 

Theft and wounds 

Unlawful possession of explosive 

Unlawfully shooting with intent to disable 

Wounding with intent to murder 

Wounding 



1 

10 

9 

1 

1 

1 

3 

13 

2 

10 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
.51 
2 
102 
3 
2 
o 
1 
10 
5 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
3 



Total 357 



CRIME STATISTICS 



103 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



DORCHEsTK.R. 



Crime. 



Xo. 



Administering poison 

Arson 

Assault with attempt to commit rape 

Assault and robbery 

Assault and jail breaking 

Assault and larceny 

\s-:uilt and causing bodily harm 

At tempted rape I 

Attempt to procure an act of gross indecency 

Breaking, entering and stealing ' 

Breaking, entering and causing injury to pro- 
perty 

Breaking and theft 

Breaking and entering 

Breaking, entering, stealing and arson ' 

Burglary and arson 

Burglary and attempt at rape 

Concealing birth of child 

Forgery 

Forgery and false pretense 

i irievoiis assault 

Gross indecency 

Housebreaking 

Housebreaking and larceny 

11. ii -..-stealing '■ 

Having counterfeit money i 

Having explosives in possession 

Indecent assault 

Endangering safety of persons on railway . . .. 

Jail breakng ....". ' 

Knowing a girl under 1 4 years 




1 

14 

1 

1 

2 

1 

11 

2 

1 

38 

2 
2 
7 
1 
1 
1 
2 
s 
1 

3 

1 
1 

3 
2 
1 
o 
4 
1 
1 
2 



Larceny J 

Larceny and jail breaking l 

Larceny and escape 1 

Larceny and attempt at rape 1 

Murder 2 

Manslaughter 7 

Malicious injury to property 1 

Neglect at childbirth 1 

Obstructing railway trains 2 

Obtaining money under false pretense 1 

Perjury I 1 

Rape .' li 

Receiving stolen goods 

Shop breaking and cattle stealing 1 

Shooting with intent to murder 6 

Shop breaking 2 

Shop breaking and larceny 1 

Stealing ." lo 

Shooting with intent to maim* 1 

Setting fire to pile of lumber 1 

Setting fire to church 1 

Stealing and receiving stolen goods 4 

Stealing letters from post office 1 

Theft 'i 

Theft by agent 1 

Uttering forged bank notes 1 

Wounding with intent 2 

Wounding 1 

Total 233 



104 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



MANITOBA. 



Crimes Committed. 



Abandoning an adopted child 

Arson 

Assault 

Assault and robbery 

Assault and stabbing, causing bodily harm. . . 

Attempt to rape 

Attempt to murder 

Attempting to carnally know girl under 14 

years 

Attempting to use a forged cheque 

Bigamy 

Breaking into post office and stealing property 

Burglary . : 

Burglary and previous convictions 

Carnally knowing girl under 14 years 

Cattle stealing 

Cattle stealing and escaping from N.W.M.P. . 

False pretenses 

Forgery 

Forgery and uttering 

Forgery and jail breaking 

Forgery and attempt to utter 

Forgery and burglary 

Forgery and false pretenses 

Forgery and theft 

Forgery, uttering and theft 

Housebreaking and theft 

Horse stealing 

Incest 

Indecent assault 

Indecent assault (four charges) 

Manslaughter 

Murder 



Crimes Committed. 



No. 



Perjury 2 

Rape .' 3 

Receiving stolen property, knowing same to 

be stolen 4 

Receiving stolen property and inducing to 

perjury 1 

Receiving stolen money 2 

Robbery 10 

Shooting with intent 1 

Shopbreaking and theft 12 

Stealing a post letter 1 

Stealing a steer 1 

Stealing grain 2 

Stealing money and jewellery 1 

Stealing from post office 1 

Theft 39 

Theft (two charges) 2 

Theft (three charges) 1 

Theft (previous convictions) 1 

Theft and breaking jail 1 

Theft and attempted escape from N.W.M.P. . 1 

Theft from the person 4 

Unlawful assault with intent to rob 1 

Unlawfully beating and wounding a woman .. 1 

Uttering 4 

Uttering and attempt to escape from 

N.W.M.P , 1 

Wilfully destroying horse bv poison 1 

Wounding, with intent to do grievous bodily 

harm 1 

Total 190 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Crimes. 



No. 



Arson 

Attempt carnal knowledge of girl under 14 . 

Assault wih intent 

Attempt to steal from the person 

Attempt to murder 

Administering poison with intent 

Assault, causing actual bodily harm 

Attempt to rape 

Accessory after the fact 

Bringing stolen goods into Canada 

Breaking, entering and stealing 

Burglary 

Cattle stealing 

Carnally knowing a girl under 14 yes 

Forgery and uttering 

Forgery .... 

Fraud 

Horsesetaling 

Having stolen goods in possession 

Incest 

ut assault 

Killing cattle - 

i icenM cancelled 

Manslaughter 



Crimes 



Murder 

Obtaining money under false pretenses. . 

Personating 

Passing counterfeit money 

Perjury and procuring 

Perjury 

Rape ." 

Robber}- 

Robbery^with violence 

Stealing 

Stealing from the person 

Stealing and breaking jail 

Shooting with intent 

Shop breaking 

Sheep stealing 

Theft of post letter 

Theft with violence 

Unlawful use of explosives 

Unlawful wounding 

Uttering 

Wounding with intent 



Total 



No. 



1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
4 
4 
'-•7 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 

5 
1 
7 

139 



CRIME STATISTICS 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

OCCUPATION PREVIOUS TO CONVICTION. 

KINGSTON. 



105 



Occupation. 



Agents 

Artists 

Accountants 

Bartenders 

Bakers 

Barbers 

Blacksmith 

Blacksmith apprentice. 

Butchers 

Bricklayers 

Brakemen 

Carpenters 

Clerks 

Couriers 

Cooper 

Cabinet maker 

Candy makers 

Coachmen 

Cooks 

Carder 

Distiller 

Driller 

Engineers 

Electrician 

Farm hands 

Farmers 

Fisherman 

Firemen 

Gambler 

Gardner 

Hotelmen 

Horsemen 

Harnessmaker 

Housekeepers 

Hostler 

Horseshoers 

Structural ironworkers . 

Jockey 

Lineman 

Labourers 

Lathers 

Lumberman 

Laundryman 

Lithographers 



Male. 



Female. 



2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
7 
3 
1 
8 
3 
5 
12 
22 
2 
1 
1 



12 
1 
1 
1 
9 
1 
2 

32 
1 

13 
1 
1 
2 



1 



1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
150 
2 
1 
1 
3 



Total. 



2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
7 
3 
1 
S 
3 
5 

12 

22 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 

12 
1 
1 
1 
9 
1 
2 

32 
1 

13 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 



1 
1 
150 
2 
1 
1 
3 



Occupation. 



Miners 

Masons 

Moulders 

Machinists 

Metal polisher 

Merchants 

No occupation 

.Picture framer 

Painters 

Pipe coverer 

Plumbers 

Plasterers 

Pedlar 

Piano maker 

Printers 

Photographer 

Ropemakers 

Sailors 

Shoemakers 

Steamfitter 

Stonecutters 

Slater 

Students 

Storekeeper 

Servants 

Stove mounter 

Shantyman 

Surveyor 

Spinner 

Tailors 

Tinsmiths 

Teamsters 

Telegraph operators. 

Varnisher 

Veterinary surgeon . . 

Watchmaker *. . . 

Waiters 

Woodturner 

Weavers 

Well digger 

Woodworker 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



1 
1 
5 
5 
1 
2 
4 
1 
11 
1 
1 
o 

1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
8 
9 
3 
3 
1 
2 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 
14 
3 
9 
5 
1 
1 
1 

1 
3 
1 
1 



1 
1 
5 
5 
1 
2 
4 
1 
11 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
S 
9 
3 
3 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 
14 
3 
9 
5 
1 
1 
1 

1 
3 

1 

1 



Total. 



441 



44s 



106 



DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Occupation. 



Architect 

Accountants 

Bookeepers 

Blacksmiths 

Bookbinder 

Bottle filler 

Butchers 

Barbers 

Bartender 

Brass finisher 

Bricklayers 

Bnikeman 

Baker 

Beggar 

Boilermaker 

Currier 

Carters 

Clerks 

Carpenters 

Cooks 

Cowboy 

Cigarmakers 

Confectioner 

Carriage maker 

Constable 

Dentist 

Doctor 

Despatcher 

Electricians 

Engineers 

Fanners 

Firemen 

Fireproof instructor 

Fisherman 

Furrier 

Gardner 

Glass blowers 

Gasfitter 

Hostlers 

Horsemen 

Hatter 

Hotelkeepers 

Jockeys 

Labourers 



Male 



9 
3 

1 
1 
6 
5 

1 
1 
2 

T 

1 
1 
1 
1 

15 

9 

13 

7 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
17 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 
2 
2 

T 

2 

2 

111 



Occupation. 



Male. 



Letter carrier. . . 
Leather cutters . 
Lumberman. . . . 
Medical student. 

Moulders 

Millman 

Machinists 

Mining engineer. 
Meter stamper. . 
Mattress maker. 

Mason 

No trade 

Office clerk 

Painters 

Polisher 

Plumbers 

Plasterer 

Pedlar 

P.O. clerk 

Printer 

Piano tuner 

Quarryman . . . . 
Ropemakers . . . 
Roadmaster. . . . 
Railroad man . . 
Steamfitters. . . . 
Shoemakers . . . . 
Stonecutters . . . , 

Sailor 

Seaman 

Steward 

Stockkeeper. . . . 
Saddler. 
Tinsmiths . 
Tailors 
Traders . 
Typographer . 
Tobacconist . 
Tiler . 
Weaver . 
Waiter . 



1 
4 
1 
1 
4 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

is 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
4 
S 

13 
1 
I 
1 
I 
1 

111 
7 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Total 



357 



GRIME STATISTICS 



107 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



DORCHESTER. 



Occupation. 



Butcher 

Barbers 

Bakers 

Blacksmith . . 
Bookkeeper.. . 
Bricklayer . . . 
Carpenter. . . . 

Cooper 

Cooks 

Candy maker. 
Domestics . . . 

Engineer 

Farmers 

Firemen 

Fishermen . . . 
< Sardeiiers . .. . 
Housekeepers . 

Hostlers 

Ironworkers. . 
Labourers. . . . 

Mason 

Mill hands 



Male. Female. 



1 
26 



53 

1 
2 



Total. 



2 
2 
2 
6 
1 
1 
7 
1 
3 
2 
9 
1 

26 
5 
5 
2 
2 
3 
5 

53 
1 
2 



Occupation. 



Miners 

Xo occupation. . . . 

Painters 

Railroad hand 

Shoemakers 

.Stonecutters 

Sailors 

Stable boy 

Printer 

Basketrnaker 

Stearnfitter 

Teamsters 

Tailors 

Trader 

Veterinary sur^c in 

Tinsmith 

Agent 

Basketmaker 

Weaver 

Total 



Male. 



16 
16 

7 
1 
4 
5 

19 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



222 



Female. Total. 



11 



16 
16 

l 

4 
5 

19 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 

T 

i 



233 



MANITOBA. 



i tccupation. 



Baker 

Barbers 

Blacksmiths. . . 
Broom-maker . 
Brakesmen. . . . 

Builder 

Butcher 

Buyer 

Carpenters 

Cattlemen 

Cigar maker. . . 

Clerks 

Cooks 

Dentist 

Draughtsman. . 
Hack driver. . . 
Electrician 

Engineers 

Farmers 

Farm labourers 

Fireman 

Horse trainers . 
Hotel clerk. . . . 
Tron-moulders. . 

■Journalist 

Labourers 




Occupation. 



32 



Laundryman 

Locomotive engineer 
Machinists . . 

Masons 

Miners 

Painters 

Paper-hanger 

Printer 

Ranchers 

Real estate agents . . 

Sailors. 

Shepherd 

Soldiers 

Shoemakers 

Stearnfitter 

Stonecutter 

Stonemasons 

Tailors 

Teamsters 

Telegraph operator. . 

Tinsmith 

Typewriter repairer . 

Watchmakers 

Xo occupation 

Total. . 



Xo. 



1 
1 
:i 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
13 



190 



108 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Occupation. 




Occupation. 



No. 



Bridge carpenter 1 

Barbers i 5 

Blacksmiths 2 

Blacksmith helper 1 

Bakers 3 

Brewer 1 

Boatmen 2 

Commercial traveller 1 

Carpenters 7 

Cigar maker 1 

Cooks 9 

Electrician 1 

Fireman 1 

Fishmonger 1 

Fishermen 2 

Harness maker 1 

Iron turner 1 

Locomotive engineer 1 

Labourers 46 

Miners IS 

Moulder 1 

Marine firemen 4 



Painters 

Paper-makers 

Porter 

Printer 

Ranchers 

Railway clerk 

Sailors 

Stationary engineer 
Shingle weaver . . . . 

Stenographer 

Shoemakers 

Tailor 

Telegraphers 

Teamster 

Trader 

Typemaker 

Wood turner 

Wood carver 

Wagonmaker 

Total. . 



139 



DUEATIOX OF SENTENCE. 

KINGSTON. 






Sentence. 



(3 

s 



Two years 29 

liver two years and under 

three years 9 

Three vears 102 

Over three years and under 

four years 5 

Four years 27 

Over four years and under 

five years 2 

Five years 95 

Over five years and under six 

years 5. 

Six years 5 

Over six yean and under 

en years 1 

a years I" 

i Iver seven years and under 

eight years 2 



29 



9 

104 



1 
41 



Sentence. 



Eight years 

Ten years 

Eleven years and six months 

Twelve years 

Thirteen years 

Fourteen years 

Fifteen years 

Sixteen years 

Eighteen years 

Twenty years 

Twenty-one years 

Twenty-two years 

Twenty-three vears 

Life. . '. .* 

Total 



S 
37 

1 
11 

1 

7 

15 

1 



1 

1 

1 

27 



■a 
s 



ui 



us 



CRIME STATISTICS 



109 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



ST. VINCENT DE PALL. 



Sentence. 



Male. 



Two years 

Over two 3*ears and less than three years . . 

Three years 

Over three years and less than four years. . 

Four years 

Five years 

Six years 

Over six years and less than seven j-ears. . . 

Seven years 

Eight 3'ears 

Nine years 



65 

10 

80 

1 

58 

52 

6 

1 

29 

5 

4 



Sentence. 



Male. 



Over nine years and less than ten years. . . . 

Ten years 

Twelve years 

Over twelve years and less than thirteen. . 

Fourteen years 

Fifteen years 

Sixteen years 

Twenty years 

Life 



2 

20 

2 

1 
5 

2 

1 

2 

11 

357 



DORCHESTER. 



Sentence. 



Two years 52 

and three months. -1 

" and four months. . 1 

" and six months. . . 2 

Three years 46 

" and six months. . 3 

Four years 26 

" and three months 3 

Five years 22 

Five years and three months 2 

Six years 10 

Seven years 14 

F.ight years 5 

Nine vears 2 



56 
4 
1 
2 

51 
3 

26 
3 

23 
2 

10 

14 
6 
2 



Nine years and one month. . 

Ten years 

Twelve years 

Fourteen years 

Fourteen years and six mon'. 

Fifteen years 

Seventeen years 

Twenty years 

Twenty-five vears 

Life. . '. 

Hundred and twelve days.. . 

Total 



1 

10 

3 

J 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
4 
1 



222 



11 



1 
10 
3 
2 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
4 
1 



233 



MANITOBA. 



Term. 



Two years 

Two veal's and four months. . . 
Two years and six months . . . 

Three years 

Three years and one month . . 
Three years and six months. . . 
Three years and seven months 

Four years 

Five years 



Xo. 



52 
2 

3 
60 

1 

2 

1 

18 

30 



Term. 



Xo. 



Six years 1 

Seven years 10 

Ten years 5 

Twelve years ' 1 

Fourteen years 'J 

Fifteen vears 1 

Life 1 

Total 190 



no 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



BlilTISII COLUMBIA. 




Two years 

Over two years and under three years. . 

Three years 

Over three years and under four years 

Four years 

Over four years and under five years. . . 

Five years 

Six years 

Over six years and under seven years. . 
Seven vears 



25 

13 

23 

2 

7 

2 

15 

4 

1 

17 



Eight years 

Ten years 

Fourteen years 

Fifteen years 

Twenty years 

Twentv-one vears. . . . 
Life. 

Total 



10 
3 
2 
1 
2 

HI 



139 



NATIONALITY. 

KINGSTON. 



— 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 





Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




285 

11 

56 

4 

21 

5 

3 

1 

3 


3 

2 

1 
1 



288 

41 

58 

5 

22 

5 

3 

1 

3 




1 
12 




1 




Italv . . 


12 




Newfoundland 


1 


1 






1 

1 
1 




1 






1 






1 




Total 




1 tl 


7 


448" 









ST. VINCENT DE PAI'L. 





Males, 






Males 








21 

1 

289 

16 
8 

11 
5 




•> 






l 






■> 






l 






Total 






:i" 













IK (III !H - I I :: 




Canada 180 

England -' I 

Ireland S 

Scotland 4 

I "rani b 1 

Newfoundland 3 

\\ ■ l Indies . .-. 2 

I inli-.l Slates 8 

Italy :: 



CRIME STATISTICS 



111 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



MANITOBA. 



Canada 

England. 
Ireland. ..... 

-Scotland . . .. 

Wales 

Australia . . . 
United States 

France 

Germany . . . 



No. 



63 

37 

3 

11 

1 
4 
33 
1 
6 



Austria . . 
Russia . . . 
Belgium . 
Sweden . . 
Denmark 
Norway 



No. 



Total . 



14 

S 
2 
1 
5 
1 



190 



BRITISH COI.l'.MBIA. 



— 


No. 





No. 




2 

if 

i 

17 

7 
2 
5 


Italy 


3 






3 






.') 


China 




1 












1 






1 






18 






1 


Greece 


Total 




139 



&.6E OF CONVICTS. 



KINGSTON. 











0) 




























Vg, 






i 
= 


= 










- 


fc, 


■— 


Under 20 vears 


44 




44 


Over 20 and under 


30 


years 


195 


1 


196 " ; 


" 30 


40 




109 


1 


110 


" 40 


50 




60 


3 


63 


" 50 


60 




16 


1 


17 



igc 



Over 60 and under 70 years. 10 

" 711 vears 7 



441 



- — 

s s 

Z c 



11 



148 



ST. VINCENT DE I'AIL. 



Age. 


Male. 




55 
1 IS 

88 
46 

lx 


" 30 " 40 ' " 


" 40 " .id " 


" 50 " 60 " 



Age. 



i im-t 60 and under ,u year.s 
< i\ .-[■ 7<i years 



Male. 



3.-.7 



112 



DEPAETilEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



DORCHESTER. 



Age. 




- 
3 
= 


1 


Age. 


Male. 
Total. 




35 

102 

50 

23 

9 


1 


36 


60 to 70 vears 2 2 


20 to 30 " 


4 106 




6 


56 1 

23 ! 

9 






40 to 50 " 


222 11 233 


50 to 60 " 









MANITOBA. 



Age. 



Male. 



Under 20 years I 19 

Over 20 years and under 30 years I 93 

30 " 40 " 45 

"40 " 50 *' 19 

BRIT 

Under 20 years 15 

Over 20 and under 30 years 55 

"30 " 40 " 35 

"40 " 50 " 19 



Age. 



Over 50 vears and under 60 years. 
60" " 70 " . 



Total. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Male. 



190 



Over 50 and under 60 years. 
" 60 " 70" " 



Total. 



MORAL HABITS. 

KINGSTON. 



11 
4 



139 



-Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Total abstainers. . . 

Temperate 

Intemperate 

Totals 



118 
204 
119 


6 

1 


US 
210 
120 


441 


7 


44S 



ST. \I.\CENT DE PAUL. 



Male. 



Abstainers 

Intemperate 

i emperate 

Total 



1S!> 

163 



367 



CRIME STATISTICS 



113 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



DORCHESTER. 



Male. 



Female. Total. 



Total abstainers 12 

Temperate 115 

Intemperate 95 

Total 222 



11 



17 
115 
101 



233 



MANITOBA. 



Xo. 



Abstainers 44 

Temperate 110 

Intemperate 36 

Total 190 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Xo. 



Total abstainers 13 

Temperate 56 

Intemperate 70 

Total 139 



CIVIL CONDITION. 

KINGSTON. 







Male. 


Female. 


Total. 








281 

152 

8 


1 
4 
2 


282 




156 




10 




Totals 






441 


7 


448 









ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Males. 



Single 

Married 

Widowed 

Total 
34—8 



251 

98 

8 



357 



114 



DEPARTMEM OF JUSTICE 



DORCHESTER. 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Male. ' FemaU 1 . Total. 



Married ... 

Widowed . 
Single 



Total . 



59 


4 


63 


° I 


1 


6 


158 1 


6 


164 



1 1 233 



White. . . 
Coloured . 
Indian . . 



Total . 







MANITOBA. 


















,. 








126 




56 




S 




Total . . . 












190 














BRITISH COLUMBIA. 






























flu 




38 




11 
















139 


















RACIAL. 

KINGSTON". 














Male. 


Female. 


Total 























410 

2.-> 
6 



4i; 



441 



148 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Number, 



Indian . . 
Coloured . 



Total 









CRIME STATIS1 ICt- 



115 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



DORCHESTER. 



Male. Female. Total. 



White i 202 S 210 

Indian 1 1 

Coloured 19 3 22 

Total 222 11 233 



MANITOBA. 



Number. 



White 164 

Coloured 2 

Indian 9 

Indian half-breed 15 

Total 190 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Number. 



White 

Indian 

Indian half-breed 

Coloured 

Mongolian 

Total 



100 
9 

12 
4 

14 



139 



CONVICTS PARDONED. 

KINGSTON. 



Name. 



Crime. 



Where sentenced. 



S. Markovitz 

James Seamone. . . 

H. F. Carter 

Mat hew Jones .. . . 

M. Q. Stagg 

Nicola Caruso . . . . 

David Day 

John Head 

Albert Parker . . . . 

G. 1. Aaselin 

Thomas Murphy. . . 
Maggie Two Flag-. 
Frank Cameron . . 
William Porter . . . 
A. Wannamker . . . 



Perjury 

Uttering forged bank notes 

Bringing stolen goods into Canada . 

Arson 

Forgery 

Wounding with intent to murder . 

Stealing post letter 

Incest 

Burglary 

Stealing 



Breaking into and stealing . . . . 

Perjury 

Stealing 

Burglary and theft 

mpt at carnal knowledg 



Toronto. 

Windsor. 

Brockville. 

Sarnia. 

Toronto. 

Port Arthur. 

Toronto 

London. 

Chatham. 

Sudbury. 

Hamilton 

Mel i. VW.T. 

Pembroke. 

Sound. 
Sarnia. 



34— 84 



116 



DEPART MEM OF JUSTICE 



5-6 liDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Name. 



Crime. 



Where sentenced. 



Bonivard, Alphonse 
Barnab£, Joseph E. 
Buisson, Eugene. . . . 
Christin. Emile . . . . 
( lousineau, Xarcisse 

Duval. Horace 

1 in-, the, Harry R. 

Jones. Thomas 

Jensen, Carl 

I.aporte, Joseph 

Molleur, Jules 

Nelson, James 

Robidoux, Jean. . . . 

Reid, Frank H 

Swilton. John 

Wabey, Frank 

Want. Henry 

William, George . . . 



Shooting with intent 

Forging a notarial act 

Theft as servant 

Robbery 

Forging a notarial act 

To procure abortion 

Receiving stolen goods 

Housebreaking 

Carnal knowing girl under 14 years. 

Robberv 

Theft. ." 

Shooting with intent 

Theft 

Uttering forged cheque 

Theft from dwelling house 

Manslaughter 

Perjury 

Wounding 



Terrebonne. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Maple Creek. 

Montreal. 

Calgary. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Terrebonne. 

Arthabaska 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Ottawa. 

McLeod (Fort). 

Quebec. 



DORCHESTER. 



Name. 



Crime. 



Where sentenced. 



Edward L. Wallace.. 

James Daley 

Henry Benoit 

Frank Hodson 

Ambrose E. Comeau 



Arson Kentville. 

Breaking and entering Sydney. 

Indecent assault Antigonish. 

False pretense Halifax. 

Receiving stolen goods Digby. 



MANITOBA. 



Name. 



Crime. 



Where sentenced, 



'Slap Face' 

J. W. Knapp 

K. Xovokshonoff. . 

W. Kakasolff 

John Lawrence. . .. 
W:i>i\ PopCOff . . . . 

Zarchoskoff . , 

kasolff 

Edward Cameron . 
'Jim Rides 

John Hoffman. . . . 



tealing McLeod, Aha. 

Horsestealing Edmonton, Aha. 

1 destroying a binder and a quantity of grain. . Yorkton, Assa. 
ine a binder and a quanty of grain. . . Yorkton. Assa. 

Cattle stealing Maple Creek. Assa. 

ing a binder and a quantity of grain. .Yorkton, Assa. 

ing a binder ami a quantity of grain Yorkton, Assa. 

I lestroying a binder and a quantity of grain. . Yorkton, Assa. 

og with intent Winnipeg. 

McLeod, Aha. 

stealing and theft McLeod, Vita. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 




I tawson, Y. T. 



CRIME ST VI 1ST li & 



117 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



CONVICTS PAROLED. 

KINGSTON. 



Name. 



Crime. 



Where sentenced. 



William Butler Housebreaking and stealing 

James Farewell Forgery and theft 

John Gordon House breaking and stealing 

J. Pangburn Seduction 

M. Peterceivitz Unlawful counselling to assault 

Sarah Allison Compelling execution of securities by force. 

Georg<* Wallace Theft 

Alvin Pepper Burglary, highway robbery, &c 

William Beard Stealing 

Thos. D. Fox Stealing horse and buggy 

W. E. Spera Obtaining money by false pretenses 

Louis Martineau Housebreaking 

Geo. Taylor Burglary 

Augustine < lauthier Manslaughter 

Isaiah Autoine Arson 

James Moore Housebreaking and stealing 

Mark Carroll Stealing 

Luther Hall Causing an explosion 

Frederick Parsons Stealing cattle 

Peter Sagle Incest 

T. Donaldson Rape 

W. J. Grocutt Stealing 

Alex. Crowe Stealing from the person 

Hyacinthe Ouellette Stealing from the person 

Leander Kimball Ha"\"ing explosives in possession 

John Ryan Stealing 

E. Renison Incest 

Wm. McCaskUl Defiling a child 

Nelson Brock 'ling 



. Windsor. 

. Goderich. 

. London. 

. Chatham. 

. Port Arthur. 

. Montreal. 

. Cayuga. 

. Berlin. 

. Hamilton. 

. Xapanee. 

. Hamilton. 

. Sudbury. 

. Montreal. 

. Montreal. 

. Brant ford. 

. Peterboro. 

. North Bay. 

. Cornwall. 

. London. 

. Gore Bay. 

. Stratford. 

. London. 

. Sault Ste. Marie. 

. Sault Ste. Marie. 

. Toronto. 

. Port Arthur. 

. Toronto. 

. St. Catharines. 

. Delhi. 



ST. VDTCEXT DE PAl"L. 



Xame. 



Crime. 



Where sentenced. 



Archambault. Eusebe 

Bergeron. Baptiste 

Belanger. Alfred 

Berube\ Joseph 

Beaudry. Joseph 

Belanger. Gregoire alias Gregory 

Baker ". 

Cyr. Xapoleon 

Constantin. Joseph E 

Chevalier. Adolphe 

Cooper. Stanley 

Derome, Thomas 

Drew. Albert Victor 

Desrosiers. Francois-X avier . . . . 

Fisher. James 

Frappier. Frank 

Faubert. Arthur 

Guard. John 

Hold- 

Harrington. Charles P 

Hennessey, John 

Langlois. Philippe 

Merrier. Alphonse 

Michaud, Arthur 

Morin. George 

Nadeau, Alphonse 

Platzman, Joseph 

Sauv^. Joseph 

Sirard. Edouard 

Sicard. William 

"is. John 

lien, Joseph 

Tourangeau. Edouard 

Tremblav. Edmond 



Theft 

Theft 

Housebreaking and stealing 

Obtaining goods on false pr« 
Breaking in place of worship 



• 

Theft 

Theft of letter containing money. 

Shop breaking 

Housebreaking and stealing .... 

Shopbreaking 

Perjury 

from person 

Theft of cattle 

pretense 

Attempt to str.-d from person . . . 

mg with intent 

Shooting with intent to kill 

Theft as servant 

I robbery 

Wounding with intent 

Theft 

Theft of a bycicle 

Shopbreaking 

Horse; 

Forgery 





Shopbreaking 

Attempt to commit murder 

i>t shopbreaking 

Robbery 

■rv 



Bedford. 

Montreal. . 
Rimouski. 
Montreal. 
Montreal. 

Ottawa. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Beauharnois. 

Montreal. 

Calgary. 

Montreal . 

Montreal. 

Quebec. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Arthabaska. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

Montreal. 

St. Francis. 

Montreal. 

Beauharnois. 

ord. 
Quebec. 
Beauharnois. 
Montreal. 
Montreal. 
Montreal. 



118 



DEPARTJIKXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



DORCHESTER. 



Xante. 



Crime. 



Where sentenced. 



Placide Boudrot 

Charlotte Saunders. . . . 

Henry Saunders 

James Kennedy 

Aldrieh Thibodeau . . . . 

John McKenzie 

Chas. McKenzie 

Duncan Mclnnis 

John Fraser 

Henry Gloss 

George Mailman 

Angus Mclnnis 

Elie Verge 

Geo. A. Chiverton 

Jno. A. Johnston 

Herbert Frost 

Norman H. McLennan. 

Henry Yancini 

Wm. G 

Wm. Connolly 

Walter Young 

Jno. Corbett 

Daniel Taylor 

Thomas King 

James Murphy 

Edward Smith 

John Archy Chi-! 

WliKam Turner 

Samuel Falick 

Dan. Gillis 

Joseph Johnston 

Joseph Nugent 

Henry Perrin 

Frank S. Stevenson . . . 

Jno. 11. Smith 

John O'Brien 

Francis Rushton 

Blanch'' I looley 

Florem ■•• I lavidson . . . . 

Daniel Messenger 

William Boyd 

Samuel Benger 





Forgery Sydney. 

Assault and larceny Halifax. 

Assault and larceny Halifax. 

Stealing Halifax. 

Shopbreaking and theft Dorchester. 

Shopbreaking and theft Sydnes - . 

Shooting with intent Sydney. 

Wounding with intent Sydney. 

Theft Sydney. 

Stealing St. John. 

Stealing Queen's. N 

Theft Sydney. 

Larceny Halifax. 

" Dalhousie. 



Dalhousie. 
St. Andrews. 
Yictoria. N.S. 
Fredericton. 

St. John. 
Sydney. 
Sydney. 
Sydney. 
St. John. 



Breaking, entering and stealing 

St ealing 

Stealing 

-ioning bodily harm 

Theft 



Larceny 

ing arrest, and larceny Halifax 

Breaking, entering and stealing St. John. 

Stealing Woodstock. 

Breaking, entering and stealing..' Inverness. 

Breaking, entering and stealing Sydney. 

ng Amherst. 

Theft Sydney. 

Indecent assault St. John. 

Stealing Sydney. 

Breaking, entering and stealing Halifax. - 

Stealing Amherst. 

Theft Sydney. 

Stealing Kentville. 

Shopbreaking Truro. 

Inflicting grevious bodily harm Halifax. 

Breaking, entering and stealing Halifax. 

: roperty Annapolis. 

Rape and attempt to commit arson Woodstock. 

Rape and robbery Inverness. 

Shopbreaking Truro. 



MANITOBA. 






Crime. 



need. 



I aid Black 

I I McMill 

e King 

Ji ihn *t ' iungson. . . . 



N. Hamelin 

i Xorris . . . . 
Christian Schultze. . 
- 

' Big Face ' 'liicf. . . 
I emm 

William G. CroweM. 



lary 

ery 

■ ling. . 

..hue . ■ 

stealing. . . 

Horsestealii 

Attempted rape . 

Stealing grain . . 



■ 



Perjury 



stealing. 

Being found intoxicated on < i.- 

gine. 
Killing a calf, with in'. • i 



Calgary Alta. 
Medicine Hat, Alta. 
Moosomin, V<--a. 
m. ......mii!. Assa. 

Regina, Assa. 
Regina, V--a 
Edmonton, Mia 
M ..mm, AfiSa. 

Winnipeg, Man 
M.i eod Uta. 
katchewai 
skatehewan, Alta. 

Regina, issa. 
Calgary, Alta. 



CHIME STATISTICS 



119 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Name. 



Crime. 



Where sentenced. 



Cattle stealing 

Forgery 

Breaking, entering and stealing. 



John Grinder 



: ick Plump 

Perry Assaulting an officer. 

Richard ilea lev Arson 

Levy. . . Stealing 

Lmii* Middleman Breaking, entering and stealing. 



Clinton. 

Grand Forks. 

Victoria. 

Xanaimo. 

Vancouver. 

Dawson, Y.T. 

Vancouver. 



Name. 



DEATHS. 

KINGSTON. 



Crime. 



Where Sentenced. 



Humphrey . 
M. J. Brennan 

i lonnelly . . . 

G. Mittlc-sta.lt'. . . . 

n Beaulieu . 

N. Clark 



Horse stealing 

Murder 

Shooting with intent to murder . 

Manslaughter 

Arson 

Wounding with intent 



Orangeville. 

Barrie. 

Hamilton. 

Pembroke. 

ftfadawaska, X.B. 

Toronto. 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Blondin. Jean Ba] 
Pominville. Olivier 



Theft and wounds . 
Housebreaking. . . . 



Winnipeg. 
Montreal. 



DORCHESTER. 

Xone. 



MANITOBA. 



Hugh Brewer 
Walt. 

Peel . . 



Horsestealing 

Forgery and uttering. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Housebreaking an< 1 theft . 



Macleod, Alta. 
Winnipeg. 



Nelson. 



120 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



INSANE CONVICTS. 

KINGSTON. 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



No. 



Name. 



Date 

of 

Admission. 



~ = 
> VI 

PS 



a 

3 
,< 



E3 — = 

::- 

-. 

Died. gig Remarks. 



.S-gM 

CQ 
— CO 

! I 



1904. 

1 Seitor, Jacob July 1 1 . 

2 Rellinger, Joseph July 13. 

3 IValandry, David July 18. 

4 Jackson, Samuel July 23 . . 

Jackson, Samuel Dec. 20. . 

5 Prevost, Emmanuel Aug. 1 . . 

6 Hull. Fred Aug. 2. . 

7 Swetka, Jutlet Aug. 26. . 

8 O'Hanlev, August Sept. 10. . 

9 Pippin, Samuel Sept. 14. . 

10 Decaire, Peter Sept. 20.. 

11 Kimball, I.eander Oct. 7.. 

12 Mittistadt, Gustave Oct. 14. . 

1905. 

13 Beaubien, William Feb. 2. . 

14 Hodge, Fred March 4. . 

15' Bavin, Wm .March 27. . 

Bavin, Wm May, 5. . 

16 O'Connors, Wm .' . . April 10. . 

17 |Bovle, John May 10. . 

1 v ( hartrand. Joseph May 23. . 

19 Stockford, David June 22. . 

20 Murphy, Joseph June 24. . 

21 Brennan, Henry June 24 . 



12 



Improved. 



Incurable. 
Improved. 

Suicide. 



Improved. 



1 Improved. 



1 Improved. 







ST. 


VINCENT DE PAUL. 


Name. 


Crime. 


Term. Remarks. 


Williams, Charles 


Theft 

Robbery . . . 






3 years. . . . Transferred to Kingston, February 16, 1 
2 year- Transferred to Kingston, June 23, 1905, 



DOliCHESTER. 

None. 



MANITOBA. 



Name. 


Crime. Sentence. 


Remarks. 




Shooting with in- :> year-. . . . 
tent to murder . , 


when received. Transferred to Selkirk 
asylum, on request of government of North- 
west Territories, May LI, 1905, 



CRIME STATISTICS 121 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

None. 
PUNISHMENTS. 

KINGSTON. 





Number 


Number 


of different 


of times ad- 


prisoners 


ministered. 


who 


were 




puni 


shed. 


37 




32 


290 




135 


15 




15 


10 




9 


2 




2 


r 




1 


13S 




1 4 


48 




42 


12 




11 


993 







Dungeon on bread and water 

Punishment in cell on bread and water . 

Sent to prison of isolation 

Reduced rations 

Shackled to cell door 

Paddled 

Deprived of cell light 

Deprived of cell light and library 

Deprived of writing privilege 

Remission forfeited 



Total number of prisoners who received one or more of the above punishments ... 34 1 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Number. 



Application of the hose 2 

Deprived remission time 469 

Deprived school for three months 3 

Deprived library books for six months 2 

Deprived of writing letters for six months 1 

Deprived of light and bed 276 

Dungeon 104 

Punishment cells 53 

Punishment cells and bread and water 47 

To wear Oregon boot 1 



DORCHESTER. 



Number 

of time* 

punishment 

was ad- 
ministered. 



Dark cell on bread and water _'] 7 

Dark cell, shackled to cell-gate working hours 47 

Bread and water 275 

Deprived of remission time , 

Deprived of lam]) 13 



Number of convicts punished 136 

r of convicts not punished 2 1 8 



122 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



MANITOBA. 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Number 

of times 

punishment 

was ad- 
ministered. 



Number 
of different 
prisoners 
who were 
punished. 



Number 

of prisoners 

who 

were not 

punished. 



Bread and water with hard bed 

Bread and water with hard bed, in penal cells, with hands 

shackled to cell gate 

Loss of remission 




170 



174 
144 



Number of prisoners who received one or more of the above punishments . 
Number of prisoners who have received no punishment 



90 
100 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Deprived of remission 

Bread and water 

Dark cell on bread and water .... 
Confined in cell on reduced rations 
Deprived of privileges 




Number of prisoners who received one or more of the above punishments . 
Number of prisoners who have received no punishment 



36 
103 



DISTRIBUTION OF CONVICTS. 

KINGSTON. 



How Employed. 



Asylum (patients) 

Blacksmith shop 

ige room 

nter shop 

Engineer's department 

Farm, gardens and stables 

il (orderlies and patients) 

Steward's department 

Laundry 

Masons 

n of isolation (penal and orderlies) . 




How Employed. 



No. 



Tin, paint and printing S 

Quarry ] 19 

Shoe shop 17 

I ailor shop 25 

Stone cutters 27 

Stone pile 42 

Binder twine shop 37 

\\ i " m! yard 6 

I < male prison 7 

i Iffices and dormitories 36 

Total 44S 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Kitchen 

Hospital 

School and library . 

lela 

nue room . . 
1 lonii tori 

Yard 



... 

I ibule . 

fors 

Mfasonc 

■ ry 





2 

14 

4 

1 

1 

19 

28 

7 

4 

24 

• 1 

18 

15 

26 

16 




22 






11 






10 






"I 






3 




Si:. Mr- 


10 






's 






2 




Gate 


1 




•) 






9 




2 











Total 


Hi 








357 









CRIME .STATISTICS 



123 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



DORCHESTER. 



How Employed. 



No. 



How Employed. 



No. 



Bakery and kitchen. 
Blacksmith shop . . . 
Carpenter shop .... 

Tailor shop 

Shoe shop 

Laundry 

Prison stables 

Cell wings 

Machine shop 

Boiler room 

Library 

Grading yard 

Farm stables 

Saw-mill 



11 

4 
S 

13 
8 

10 
i 

14 
3 
2 
1 

16 
5 

10 



Quarry 

Farm 

Stonecutters 

Masonry (new tank) 
Masonry (new shops) 

Hospital 

Hospital (orderly). . . 
In cell (sick) 
Idle 

Punishment cell 
Female prison 



8 
U 
25 

11 

32 

3 

1 

lo 
5 
1 

11 




MANITOBA. 



Carpenter shop 

Stone cutting 

New wing construction . 

New prison 

Tailor shop 

Knitting 

hop 

Barber 

Basement orderly 

Kitchen orderlies 

Bakery 

Steward's orderly 

1 1 orderlies 

In cells 

Engine room 

Iry and dry room 
smith shop 

Cleaning surroundings. . 



11 

8 

21 

13 

17 

2 

8 

1 

1 

4 

3 

1 



Stone breaking 

In penal eel!- 

Chapel orderlies 

Hospital orderlies 

Hospital patients 

Farm yard and stables 

Piggery 

Main hall orderlies 

Front entrance grounds 

Wardens grounds 

Deputy warden's grounds 

Brickyard 

At quarters 

Office orderly 

Female lunatic at Selkirk asylum 



Total . 



13 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 

22 
1 
1 
1 



190 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Blacksmith 

Carpenter 

Shoe shop 

Tailor shop 13 

Farm 5 

Vegetable garden 2 

Piggery 1 

Stables 2 

Making hay 15 

Xew wing 11 

Hospital.. 1 

Kitchen 7 

lent 1 

Store 1 

W;n K 4 

- Is 2 



Accountant's office 2 

Main hall 1 

nger 1 

Laundry 4 

Clothes room 2 

Warden's grounds 2 

Deputy warden's grounds 1 

Barber shop 2 

Surroundings 2 

Brickyard 28 

Claj pit 

Punishment 4 

In cells (sick) 2 

In cells 2 

Total 139 



124 



DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



ACCIDENTS. 

KINGSTON. 

None. 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 

None. 

DORCHESTER. 

None. 

MANITOBA. 

None. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

None. 
CREEDS. 

KINGSTON. 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Church of England 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic 

Baptist 

Lutheran 

Unitarian 

Congregationalist 

Salvation Army 

Jew 

Total 



441 



112 

86 

47 

160 

20 


1 
2 
1 
3 


113 
88 
4S 

163 
20 


12 




12 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 









448 



CRIME STATISTICS 



125 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Number. 



Roman Catholic 

Church of England 

Presbyterian 

Methodist 

Adventist 

Congregational 

Mormon 

Universalis! 

Jew 

No creed 

Total 



294 
30 
18 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 



357 



DORCHESTER. 



Roman Catholic. ... 

Baptist 

Church of England. 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Adventist 

Unitarian 

Lutheran 

No creed 



Total. 



106 

33 

49 

15 

26 

1 

1 

1 

1 



233 



MANITOBA. 



Church of England 

Roman Catholic 

Presbyterian 

Methodist 

Lutheran 

Baptist 

Mormon 

Adventist 

Quaker 

Total 



58 

61 

25 

17 

13 

9 

5 

1 

1 



190 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 







24 




15 




23 




7 




1 




3 


Buddhist 


14 




2 




48 




1 




1 




Total 






139 









5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX II. 



LABOUR STATISTICS. 



127 



5-6 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



A. 1906 



Statement of Labour Performed During the Fiscal Tear, 
kingston penitentiary. 



Departments. 



Days. 



Rate. 



Amount. 



Bakery 

Blacksmith 

Broom 

Binder twine 

Carpenter 

Change room, laundrv and barbers 

Clerical staff " 

Engineer 

Female prison 

Farm 

Hospital 

Kitchen and mess 

Loom 

Mason 

Printing and bookbinding 

Prison of isolation 

Prison of isolation 

Quarry 

Stonecut t ing 

Stone pile 

Shoe 

Tin and paint 

Tailor 

Wood and coal 

Wing and cells 



2,073* 
8,380^, 

158} 
6,955* 
4,228,5, 
5,899} 
1,520 
5,762 
2.721 
7.336* 
1.772" 
4,651 

321^ 
9,409 

690 
1.433* 

43.5" 
6,405} 
11.1S7 
8,303} 
4,721 
1.6X2,; 
6,801 
1,897 
7,016* 



S cts. 

30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
20 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
20 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 



S cts. 

622 05 

2.514 12 

47 46 

2,086 50 

1,268 49 

1,769 S5 

456 00 

1.728 75 

• )44 20 

2,200 95 

531 60 

1,395 30 

96 51 

2,822 70 

207 00 

430 05 

87 00 

1,921 65 

3,356 10 

2,501 33 

1,416 30 

504 63 

2.040 30 

569 10 

2,104 95 



ST. VINCENT DE PALL PENITENTIARY. 



Clerical staff, barber, messenger, &c 

Bookbindiry 

Steward 

Bakery 

Carpenters 

Tailors 

Shoe shop 

Stonecutters 

Engineer 

Change room 

Tinsmiths 

Blacksmiths 

Brickyard 

Quarry 

Excavation 

Woodshed 

Masons 

Dome 

Farm 

Sewerage 

Biggery 

Stables 

Institution 

Electric department 

Ornamental grounds 

Total 



1.565 

58*. 
5,785} 
1,236 
7,431 
5,458*. 
4,968} 
7,972 
10,449 
4,952 
3,226 
4,938 

730* 
3,090} 
7,161*. 
5,008* 
2,357} 
9,207 
4,947 \ 

I. -.!',' 

1 ,390} 
1.273} 
2.714 

515*. 

315 



ll.',...lll!l 



30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
O 30 
30 
30 
30 
II 311 
30 
30 
30 
n 311 
n 311 
II 30 
30 
II 311 
O 30 
(I 3(1 
o 30 
ll 30 
30 



469 50 

17 55 

1,735 72 

370 80 

2,229 30 

1,637 55 

1,490 48 

2,391 60 

3.134 70 

1,485 60 

967 80 

1,481 40 

219 15 

927 22 

2,14S 45 

1,502 .V> 

707 33 

2,762 10 

1,484 25 

46 95 

417 22 

382 13 

- 1 I 20 

164 65 

'l| .Ml 



29 072 70 



34^9 



129 



130 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



DORCHESTER PENITENTIARY. 



Departments. 



Days. 



Rate. 



Amount. 



Shoe shop 

Tailor shop 

Carpenter shop 

Blacksmith shop .... 

Machine shop 

Masons 

Stonecutters 

Quarry 

Bakery 

Saw-mill 

Farm 

Stable and teams .... 

Loading coal 

Laundry 

Kitchen 

Cell wings . . , 

Barbers 

Boilers 

Breaking stone 

Library 

Office 

Grading and ditching . 

Lumbering 

Sawing wood 

Shovelling snow 

Building dam 

Moving barn 

Cutting ice 

Repairing roads 

Female labour 



$ cts. 

2,839 

4,279 

3,349 

1,172 

990 

5,618 

8,446 

2,279 

922 

826 

3,981 

3,732 

222 

1,151 

2,136 

4,689 

590 

2S4 

8,779 

296 

295 

195 

639 

79 

2S3 

64 

12S 

53 

286 

1,295 



Total 



S cts. 

30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
20 



$ cts. 

851 70 

1,283 70 

1,004 70 

351 60 

297 00 

1,685 40 

2,533 SO 

683 70 

276 60 

247 80 

1,194 30 

1,119 60 

66 60 

345 30 

640 SO 

1,406 70 

177 00 

S5 20 

2,633 70 

88 80 

SS 50 

58 50 

191 70 

23 70 

84 90 

19 20 

38 40 

15 90 

S5 80 

259 00 



17,839 60 



MANITOBA PENITENTIARY. 



Tailor shop 

Shoemaker shop 

Blacksmith shop 

Engineer 

Carpenter 

Baker 

Mason 

Farm 

Steward 

Change room and laundry . 

Hospital orderlies 

Brickyard 

Breaking stone 

General employment 

Quarry 

Excavating now cell wing. . . 
Industrial shops building. . . . 

Handling brick 

Barbers 

Main hall and office orderlies 
Painting and kalsominirig. . . 
II" |>i!al wing 

Grave digging 

Prison orderlies 

Sawing wood 

Picking potatoes 

Total 



5,949* 
2,722* 
6464 
1,416 
2,951 

708i 
4,385 
4.757 
1 ,S25 
1,317*. 
298 
1.4SS 
■js:! 
571* 
113 
1 7.". 
17' 
172 
288 
1 071 
I II : 
604^ 

s 

2,478 

2.197 

..1 



37,246 



30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 

ii ".ii 

ii ,;n 

.'in 

ii mi 

ii .'.n 

ii 30 

30 

ii 30 

30 

30 

ii jo 

ii 30 

ii 30 



1.7M 85 

816 75 

193 95 

424 SO 

885 30 

212 55 

1,315 50 

1.427 10 

547 50 

395 25 

89 40 

446 40 

84 90 

171 45 

33 90 

111 75 

5 10 

51 60 

86 40 

321 30 

132 45 

181 38 

2 40 

74.i 40 

669 in 
19 35 



11,173 80 



LABOUR STATISTICS 



131 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



BRITISH COLUMBIA PENITENTIARY. 



Department. 



Days. 



Value. 



S cts. 



Laundry 

Barbers 

Warden's grounds 

Deputy warden's grounds.. . 

Bakery 

Blacksmith 

Carpenter 

Shoe shop 

Tailor shop 

Brickyard 

Store 

Repair shop 

Chapels 

Accountant's office 

Library 

Hospital 

Surrounding's 

Halls 

Prison wing and annex ... 

Quarry 

New wing 

Water works 

Fencing 

Stables and teaming 

Farm and vegetable garden . 
Tending cattle and pigs .... 

Basement 

Kitchen 

Cutting ice 



S eta. 



1,204* 


361 35 


396 


118 80 


407* 


122 25 


327 


98 10 


219 


65 70 


1,318* 


395 55 


1,705* 


511 65 


1,735* 


520 65 


2,797 


839 10 


2,166 


649 80 


289 


86 70 


690* 


207 15 


333* 


100 05 


309 


92 70 


310* 


93 15 


307* 
1,201* 


92 25 


360 45 


330* 


99 15 


1,275* 


382 65 


4,185* 


1.255 65 


4.747* 


1,424 25 


605* 


1S1 65 


135 


40 50 


1,537 


461 10 


2,350* 


705 15 


738 


221 40 


883* 


265 05 


1,386 


415 SO 


42 


12 60 



Total . 



33,934+ 10,180 35 



34—9A 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX I. 



PER CAPITA COST. 



133 



134 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



c 



"3 

1 



2g 



lis 

= -2 

ID a CO 






3 . 

-^ CI 



|1 S . 

5 I 



O ^ (N O CO ■* CI 

NCCH«XH^ 



osco r- iciNCi 
co cc cc •— c cc 



lO OS 1--2 i-t .-i (C <*t< 

°„ w - °i ^ ^^ l °- 
b-" ^""cc" cc* 10* cc" i-T 

CN CN C CN 



CO U3 

■^cc 



MNOOOKN 

OOlCCi'C'tO 



^OtOiOOO 

o» io io »o -* r- 



3 



[if 8 
3 a 



te III 1-1 



£ 



LI *?2 CN O — Ci <0 

H«H«H«0B 

CC ■<* CO 01 Ol © CI 

cc ^ ci sc ™ ^* cs 



cc c ei -* •* cc 

CC ■*- CC :C — -* 

cc « t~ ■~>,>oa» 



o ■* cc cc tc » ce 
t^ ^ cc^ r^ cc_ co c: 
oT— "ofcc'ccr*.*' 



0.3 

cs a 

- a 

I. > 

5 £ 



$5 



S 
<1 
Ph 

a 
a 

Eh 
X 

a 
o 
is 



5Q 






CO b- h- to cc ^- cc 

CC 10 lO O -*« CO CN 
OC CO C 01 CO^N OS 

I/JH i-t 



on fc 



a 

is |1 j* 

<5'3 * ot 9.s 




as 
<s a 

»- £ 
a 1 - 



8-3 



CQ 55 



PER CAPITA COST 



135 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



M — 



•vna — aci 
*-nnnoi 
«T w 






roc 



H 
x 

W 

s 
o 

s 
o 

- 



t 



* to .-< t- - — cq 

x ci ri re r: c. co 
ci us x c. ?i -r cc 



t- m — — ■* — 

*r O W M -r — 

rC t~ N r- N -* 



- 



c N r~ r~ -c r~ r: 
n — r. c c: t~ r~ 



■2 3 



5,8 

5 4) H 

fl d C I.„ a, 

2 M M.S = i 
a r rf-c ja a 

S *■- -s -= 

t.9 t i- - a i- 



5 



IC P5 SC C CI -"I" 1< 

»ft c: h- »c x ro x 

£-'-'./ CI IN 
CO 



X l ' £ 



oix -a- c: *r cc 
— _M_— a S t~ 
i-Tef — " » 



U)hOO<Oh<4( 

cim'— i;'i.-k 
cc-< — — 



«■* 



i I 



O >Q PC m ci ȣ h- 

r- c. r~ w ~ -? * 



as 
« a 

c o 

u > 

8.8 



oc 



~ — ri •*■ -r v. 
x — x c c-i ■* 



c s 

% 9 

t "S c 

a « 

r t a 

id x o. 

E i ^ 



00 

o 



S 0! 

S- 3 
a c 



.-- y 



T. 

3 
g 

1=1 
5 5 



_ 3 

in s 

« 0~ 3.2 



136 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-t: EDWARD VII., A. 1905 



- 

a 
p 

o 
O 



mm 

2 * 



e 



d 

CJ 


— r- M eo eo os »o •<* 

S r- — — C: C-l C: X 
■■C r> ic — r~ C — 








Net cost. 


s cts. 

24,202 62 
7.026 48 

634 •">:( 
5,772 63 
1,585 06 
9,057 75 

226 40 


■* 
o 
of 

«-0 


1 ± 

■til 
~B _- 
» -co 

f. — c 

■/. - - 

j, | 


« cts. 

1.198 77 

1.671 72 

546 1 1 

2.247 49 

im 59 

234 is 




CI 
X 

CJ 
r- 

- 

CO" 


^ 


l. 33 O r~ CM *C CO G 

- co « so T-* eo o> ■* 

* O OS QC fj -3 - fl 

n — 


CC 
CO 

A 

-■ 


Prison 

products 

used. 


.2 oti 

C CO O! 

■*CN ■ ■ ■ 
¥• O W 




Expenditure, 
1904-5. 


OB 

•a — — 


056 2(1 
6.5S3 40 
3, ISO 55 
9.327 48 

220 40 


CO 

eo 

o" 
>o 


O^ 1 
CM 


Supplies <>n 

hand 
July l, 1904. 


1,065 58 
2,282 is 

224 47 
1,436 63 

1,880 10 

Slit I.", 




eo 


a) 
■- 

E 

$ 

X 

"3 

-3 

a 
o 


tc 
■7. 


1 

- 

: 

z 
: 

"e 

i 
c 

- 

'5 

3 


1 

: 
X 
- 

I 

i 

2 


! 

- f 

J? 

— - 


— 

z 

i 

ei 

'1 
: 

: 


- 


i 
3 









.■S CJ 

-3 

s a 

- c 

b > 

» £ 



5 3 

ol?. 



- x 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX J. 



REVENUE STATEMENT. 



137 



5-6 EDWARD VII. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



A. 1906 



REVENUE. 

KINGSTON. 





Revenue. 


s 

33,711 

3,558 

1,080 

1,022 

272 

104 

S07 

5 

21 

121 

155 

144 

74 

129 

10 

31 

155 

1,294 

23 

33 


cts. 

66 
89 
85 
11 
90 
16 
57 
31 
44 
75 
38 
58 
00 
57 
54 
50 
00 
24 
17 
59 


S cts. 


Tailor 




Shoe 










































































Casual Revenue. 


42,758 21 




1 

5 

34 

2 


00 
00 
00 
50 




«. 














« 


42 50 








42,800 71 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 



Revenue. 

Shoe 

Carpenter 

Rent 

Brick yard 

Tinsmith 

Tailor 

Stonecutter 

Storekeeper 

Farm 

Survey board 

Engineer 

Steward 

Bookbindery 

Bakery 

Blacksmith 

Electric department 

Water supply 

Hospital 



Casual Revenue. 



Survey board. 



S cts 



3S3 


34 


345 


59 


199 


68 


40 


94 


211 


03 


33S 


63 


897 


22 


74 


72 


117 


85 


2 


45 


632 


56 


70 49 


8 


75 


2 


89 


451 


94 


11 


05 


312 


93 


20 


79 



S cts. 



4,122 S5 



35 5S 
4,158 43 



139 



140 



DEPARTMi:\T OF JUSTICE 



DORCHESTER. 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 





Revenue. 


$ 

104 

40 

179 

93 

16 

14 

794 

43 

63 

2 

o 

5 



11 

988 

2 

42 


cts. 

34 
62 
33 
5S 
24 
55 
44 
75 
40 
00 
35 
75 
90 
94 
50 
55 
94 


$ Ct3 






Shoe 




Tailor 




















































Hospital 








2,407 IS 









MANITOBA. 





Revenue. 


S cts. 

2,361 63 

7S3 s_> 
25 92 
500 19 
26 46 
673 32 

3 43 
10 

70 11 

4 90 
42 30 


$ cts. 














































Casual Revenue. 


4,492 18 




107 00 
2 55 










109 55 








4,601 73 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 





l>> rcnue. 


$ cts. 

81 30 
539 37 

23 47 
345 39 
183 43 
119 53 
252 1)5 

is 19 
170 28 

10 75 

50 00 


S cts. 


Bakery 
















Tailor 












Store .... 




Stable 










Casual Revenue. 


1,793 76 
5 00 
















1,798 76 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX K. 



EXPENDITURE STATEMENT. 



i ii 



5-6 EDWARD VI!. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



A. 1906 



Kingston. 



Salaries. 



Warden, 1 year 

Surgeon, 1 year 

Protestant chaplain, 1 year 

Roman Catholic chaplain, 1 year, 

Accountant, 1 year 

Engineer, 1 year 

Warden's clerk, 1 year 

Storekeeper, 1 year 

Assistant storekeeper, 1 year . . . 

Steward, 1 year 

Assistant steward, 1 year 

Hospital overseer, 1 year 

Assistant hospital overseer (less 
deduction), 1 year 

Matron, 1 year 

Deputy matron, 1 year 

Electrician, 1 year 

Assistant electrician, 1 year 

Messenger, 1 year 

Firemen, 3 at $500, 1 year 

Chief trade instructor, 1 year 

Superintendent twine industry, 1 
year 

Trade instructors, 5 at $700 (less 
deduction), 1 year 

Trade instructors, 4, broken periods 

Assistant farm instructor, 1 vear. . 

Stable guards, 3 at $500, 1 year .... 

Deputy warden, 1 year 

Chief keeper, 1 year 

Keepers, 9 at $600 (less deduction) 
1 year 

Keepers, broken periods 

Guards, 36 at $500 (less deduc- 
tion) , 1 year I 

Guards, broken periods 

Temporary officers 



Retiring allowance, R. Pogue . 



Uniforms. 

Badges, bronze, 8 doz 
Blacking, shoe, 16 doz. . . 
Boston polish, 5 galls . . . . 
Buttons, trouser, 48 gross . 
Buttons, uniform, 12 gross 
Braid, military, 6} gross . . 

Buckram, 50 yds 

Capes, waterproof, 2 doz . . 

Cloth, scarlet, 7J yds 

Cloth, hair, 701. yds 

Cloth, .Italian, 162 yds . . . 
Cloth, Venetian, 2 J yds . . . 
Cloth, cheese, 278} yds . . . 
Canvas, French, 617 yds . . 
Cotton, gray, 240 yds .... 

Caps, hair seal, 52 

Caps, persian lamb, 8 . . . . 

Caps, peak, 21 doz 

Chanel cement. 2 galls . . . 

Crowns enamelled, 2 

Cleaning fluid 

Denim, blue, 219J yds 



$ cts. 

2,600 00 

1,800 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

1,400 00 

1,200 00 

800 00 

900 00 

600 00 

900 00 

600 00 

800 00 

699 03 

600 00 

400 00 

S00 00 

600 00 

600 00 

1,500 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

4,196 IS 

1,270 84 

600 00 

],.-,! Ill llll 

1,500 00 
1,000 00 

5,395 56 
644 34 

17.916 71 
3.701 61 
1,795 61 



60,719 88 
873 61 



61,593 49 



24 00 
13 40 

7 40 
4 68 

35 20 
110 25 

8 50 
48 00 
2'. I in, 
26 62 
77 00 

'l mi 

11 83 

'il 'in 

22 19 

115 60 

56 00 

46 90 

3 40 

2 oo 

-,n 

35 16 



Uniforms — Concluded. 



Drilling, 332J yds 

Eyelets, 6 box 

Felt, shoe, 19 lbs 

Freize, 161 J yds 

Farmer's satin, 154 J yds 

Hooks, tailors, 3 gross 

Hooks, boots, 12 box 

Italian cloth, 40} vds 

Leather, welt, 57 fbs 

Leather, patent calf, 4 skins .. 
Leather, vie. kid, 22J lbs .... 
Leather, French calf, 118} lbs. 
Leather, French kip, 99 lbs . . . 

Leather, sole, 458 lbs 

Leather, box calf, 12} lbs .... 

Laces, boot, 4 gross 

Lining, 94} yds 

Linen, stay, 95 yds 

Mitts, 5 prs 

Padding, S4} yds 

Oil, Cuban, 2 qts 

Rubber, tissue, 4 lbs 

Sweatbands, 13 doz 

Serge, 886 vds 

Silesia, 368" yds 

Silk, sewing, 2 lbs 

Silk, twist, buttonhole, 2 lbs . . 
Shanks, boot, steel, 2 gross . . . 

Waterproof coat, 1 

Wadding, 2 bales 

Webbing, gaiter, 12 rolls 

Containers 

Freight and express 



Police Mess. 



Apples, fresh, 10 brls 

Apples, evaporated, 362 lbs 

Apricots, 25 lbs 

Butter, 1,194 lbs 

Beef , 6,714 lbs 

Baking powder, 36 lbs 

Baking soda, 10 lbs 

Cheese, 630 lbs 

Cornstarch, 52 lbs 

Cinnamon, 2 lbs 

Currants, 60 lbs 

Eggs, 133 doz 

Essences, 1 doz 

Fish, fresh, 705 lbs 

Figs, 194 lbs 

Ginger, 13 lbs 

Lemons, 6 doz 

Milk, 334 galls 

Mustard, 32 lbs 

Nutmegs, 2 lbs 

Prunes, 275 lbs 

Raisins, 184 lbs 

Seasoning 

Sago, 10 lbs 

Sugar, gran. , 300 lbs 

Tapioca, 40 lbs 

Vinegar, 2 galls 



$ cts. 

32 40 

90 

20 90 
242 63 

76 01 

1 13 

4 20 
IS 22 

18 24 
12 00 

5 92 
151 14 

89 10 

111 28 

3 57 

3 70 

27 02 

19 00 

6 25 

21 19 

1 80 
6 50 

14 30 

1,862 01 

74 S2 

12 50 

9 00 

3 00 

14 50 

11 00 

2 40 

3 80 
19 43 



3.67S 45 



17 00 
21 72 

3 50 
238 80 
266 5S 

17 40 

20 

56 70 

2 60 
50 

4 20 
26 42 

60 
56 56 

9 70 

1 95 
1 02 
49 26 

3 40 
80 



13 


75 


12 


ss 





30 





35 


• 13 


50 


1 


40 





30 


821 


39 



143 



144 



DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 



Kingston — Continued. 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Roti&ns. 



Beef, 87.324 lbs 

Barlev. pot. 1.376 lbs . . . 

Beans. 10.S58 lbs 

Cabbage. 1.310 heads. . . 

Flour. 2. 4SS bags 

Lard. 20 lbs 

Milk (skim - ). 85,700 lbs 

Molasses, .21 galls 

Meal. corn. 500 lbs 

Pease, split, 5.198 lbs . . . 

Pickles. 50 galls 

Potatoes. 683 bags 

Pepper. 332 lbs 

Potassum nitrate, 55 lbs . 
Rolled oats. 20.523 lbs . . 

Rice, 7,500 lbs 

Testing flour 

Salt . 50 brls 

Salt. 12,600 lbs 

Spice, 107 lbs 

Sugar. 32.915 lbs 

Tea, 1,560 lbs 

Vinegar, 345 galls 

Yeast, 300 lbs 

Christmas extras 

Cartage 

Freight 



Prison Clothing. 



Buttons, shirt, 38 gross 

Buttons, coat. 6 gross 

Buckles, pants. 12 gross 

Batting. 6 lbs 

Boot ink. 5 galls 

Binding, stay, 3 gross 

Cork wood. 2 pes 

Cotton, grav. 882} yds 

Cloth, prison, 1 .283} yds 

Camphor, gum. S lbs 

Cottonade, 291} yds 

Duck. 2053 yds 

Denim, striped. 1.356} yds 

Drilling, 417 yds 

Ej elets, 6 boxes 

Hat-, 17 doz 

Ink, printers. 10 lbs 

Jean. 108 yds 

Leather, sole. 4,278} lbs 

Leather, upper, 444 lbs 

Leather, oil Russets, 10 doz. 
Leather, cap peak. 164 | lbs 
Leather, Canada kip. ,78 lbs 

Leather, pebble 36} ft 

Leather, laces, 42 gross 

Nails, -hoe assorted. 302 lbs . . 
Oil, neatsfoot, lo galls 

oil. nsh, 1 ql 

Pegs, shoe, 2} bush. . 
Rivete shoe 32 lbs 
Underclothing, 112 doz. 
Shirting, Galatea, 2,255} yds. 

Thread, linen, 15 Lbs 

Thread, rotten. 2 gross 
Thread shoe, 14 lbs. 
Tacks shoe, 10 ll>- 

Tallow, 31 '. lbs , 

\ am Hi" lbs 

< Containers 

I reight and express ._• 



I.i -- Refund of expenditure. 



S CtS. 

3.652 11 

20 64 

190 02 

19 65 



5.013 


00 1 


2 


llll 


214 


00 ) 


259 


56 


8 


75 


1 1 15 


96 


30 


00 


551 


: 


44 


40 


o 


50 


631 


35 


280 


00 


S 


00 


61 


25 


75 


60 


26 


75 


1,399 


63 


2SS 


lo 


62 


10 


89 


40 


95 


82 


30 


50 


38 


93 


13,204 


37 


3 


67 


2 


60 


2 


in 


1 


20 


2 


4(1 


1 


35 





10 


81 


38 


737 


87 


o 


60 


oo 


38 


36 


ill 


352 


69 


40 


65 





90 


16 


15 


4 


12 


4 


S3 


1,026 


S4 


146 


33 


1 1 15 


llll 


19 


74 


32 


76 


5 


15 


39 


20 


26 


mi 


9 


mi 




20 


■> 


88 


12 


mi 


616 


mi 


311 


21 


27 


75 


16 


,-,n 


HI 


50 


1 


llll 


2 


20 


134 


nn 


^ 


mi 


12 


7n 


3,917 


55 


1 1 15 


70 


3.81 1 


85 



Hospital. 

Biscuits. 47 lbs 

Butter, 157 lbs 

Drugs and medicines .... 

Eggs, 245 doz 

Essences, 4 doz 

Milk, 1 ,394} galls 

Mustard, } lb 

Nutmegs, 2 lbs 

Professional services 

Stool, pairs, } doz 

Safety pins, 12 doz 

Sugar, granulated, ISO lbs 

Tapioca, 410 lbs 

Tobacco, 156 lbs 

Whisky, 2 galls 



Freedom Suits. 

Buttons, coat. 25 gross 

Buttons, collar, 13 gross 

Braces, 6 doz 

Boots, womens', 2 prs 

Collars, 7 doz 

Canvas, 396 yds 

Dress goods, 4^ yds 

Hats. felt. 10 doz" 

Handkerchiefs. 1 1 doz 

Hats, womens', 5 

Jackets, womens', 5 

Jean. 159} yds 

Leather, Canada kip, 174} lbs. .. . 

Leather, sole, 127 lbs 

Neckties, 10} doz 

Silesia, 209 vds 

Sateen, 192 yds 

Shirts, cotton, 11 doz 

Shirts and drawers (under), 23 doz 

Stay linen, 46 vds 

Tweed, 9S4} yds 

Rubbers, 1 pr 

Skirt, 1 

Stockings, over 

Yarn, 12 lbs 

Freight and express 



Allowances and Transportation, 

3 at $5 

1 at $6 

6 at $7 

Ill at $.8 

12 at $9 

8 at $10 

17 at $11 

HI at $12 

1 1 at $13 

16 at $14 

3 at $15 

1 at $16 

4 at $17 

3atU8 

1 at $19 

120 

2 at $21 

1 at $26 

1 at $27 

I at $28 

1 at $311 

1 at $52 

I at »75 



•? eta. 

2 95 

31 40 

565 S6 

48 82 

2 40 

205 66 

25 

SO 

5 00 

5 40 
60 
8 10 

14 41 
73 32 

6 00 



970 97 



6 04 
60 
6 60 
3 00 

5 95 
26 73 

3 38 
45 00 

6 60 

7 50 
12 50 
11 55 
73 30 
30 48 
10 75 
20 98 
20 16 
66 00 
79 00 

5 98 
246 24 

50 

1 00 

49 

4 SO 

1 00 



696 13 



15 00 
6 00 

42 00 

51 I llll 

10S 00 

s 

1S7 nn 
228 00 
I I : 00 
224 00 
45 00 

16 00 

l,N llll 
54 00 

19 oo 
60 00 
42 00 

26 00 

27 oo 

28 00 
30 oo 

52 00 
75 00 



EXPEyrmriiE 



145 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Kingston — Continued. 



Allowances and Transportation — 
Concluded. 

Matron's travelling expenses, taking 
female prisoner to McLeod, 
X.WT 



Less — Refund of expenditure 



Transfers and Interments. 



Transfers . . 
Interments . 



Heat. Light and Water. 

Coal, run of mine, 1 ,836 . 444 tons 

Coal, stove, 1S6. 1,520 tons 

Coal, egg. 113. 1,050 tons 

Coal oil, 751 .83 galls 

Lamps, electric, 150 

Matches, i case 

Wi iod. 94£ cords 

Hauling wood 

Freight 

Customs 



Maintenance of Buildings. 

Alum. 11 lbs 

Actinolite ore. 6 bags 

Alabastine, 150 lbs 

Babbit metal, 25 lbs 

Buckles, wrought iron, 5 

Battery jars and zincs 

Bathbrick, 2 cases 

Burning lime kiln 

Bolts, car, 60 lbs 

Bug poison, 1 pt 

Colours — 

Imported green, 50 lbs 

Lump green, 25 lbs 

Yellow ochre 

TJ. marine blue, 100 lbs . . . . 

Wine. 6 lbs 

Copper basin, 1 

Cocks, basin, 6 

Cesspools, 2 

Closets, parts for 

Closets, flush valves, 30 

Closets, connections 

Chloride of lime, 177 lbs 

Castings, 928 lbs 

Carbon batteries, 1 doz 

Carbolineum, 434 galls 

Cord, electric, 100 yds 

Closet, 1 

Cylone paper, 20 rolls 

Pole arresters, 2 

Station base, marble, 4 

Emery cloth, 1J reams 

Elbows. 192 

Fly paper, 2 boxes 

Fittings, sundry, small 

Glass, 1 brl. 

7 cases 

Globes, outer, 1 doz 

34—10 



S cts. 



175 00 



1,830 00 


67 50 


1.762 50 


302 02 


40 15 


342 17 


4,938 44 


999 17 


607 36 


127 SI 


29 00 


2 13 


402 33 


14 00 


3 11 


3 50 


7,126 85 


35 


3 90 


9 53 


3 75 


72 


7 10 


1 00 


S 75 


2 35 


35 


7 50 


3 75 


7 57 


S 00 


1 32 


75 


7 00 


6 50 


1 SO 


270 00 


9 00 


S 85 


36 75 


3 00 


434 00 


6 00 


4 80 


12 llll 


11 70 


32 00 


18 53 


35 9S 


1 00 


2 80 


1 .-,11 


24 77 


7 00 



Maint. of Buildings — Concluded, 

Heater, parts for 

Hair, plasterer's, 2 sacks 

Iron, bar, assorted. 1,137 lbs. . . . 

Iron, Russian, 120 lbs 

Japan, 5 galls 

Japan, gold size, 5 gall 

Lead, white, 3,100 lbs 

Lamp, electric globes, 228 

Lath. 4 m 

Lamp black, 10 lbs 

Leather, lace, 2SJ lbs 

Lumber, pine, 19.29S ft 

Lumber, hemlock, 1,514 ft 

Latches, J doz 

Lawn mower, parts of 

Labour 

Xails, wire roofing, 1 keg 

Nails, w'ire. 9 kegs 

Xails, moulding. 40 lbs 

Nuts, hex., 60 lbs 

Nuts, square, 175 lbs 

Oil, raw, 81$ gall 

Oiled, boiled, 90f gall 

Oakum, 100 lbs 

Paper, toilet. 30 boxes 

Pipe, iron, 6.907 ft 

Polish, metal. .50 lbs 

Polish, putz., 1 doz 

Polish, automatic, 50 lbs 

Plaster paris, 1 bbl 

Rosettes, 2 doz 

Sal rmoniac, 150 lbs 

Soap, fig, 10.325 lbs 

Soap, common, 7,520 lbs 

Soap, powder, 222 lbs 

Soap, chips. 932 lbs 

Soda, washing, 15,935 lbs 

Soda, bicarb, 10 lbs 

Screws, coach, 4 doz 

Screws, wood, 24 gross 

Steel plate. 1 piece 

Sapolio, 39 doz 

Shellac, 5 galls 

Skeleton pivoted arm 

Steel machine, 1S4 lbs 

Switches, 1 doz 

Salts, Yager. 6 bottles 

Tile, 21 ft 

Tar, coal, 6 brls 

Tape, Grimshaw, 10 lbs 

Taps and plugs, taper 

Taps and basin, 4 

Turpentine, S64T, galls 

Tecs. 3 

Valves, closet. 2 

Valves, heavy globe, 4 

\\ ire, spool. 1 

Wire, iron, 4 lbs 

Wire, stovepipe. 5 lbs 

Wire, spring, 3$ lbs 

Wire, electric, 52S ft 

Washers, 32 doz 

Washers, 32J lbs 

Waste, white. 303 lbs 

Wick, cotton, 6+ lbs 

Customs 

Containers 

Freight and cartage 



Refund of expenditure 



§ cts. 



4 47 


3 50 


21 29 


13 14 


4 00 


4 00 


149 95 


43 SO 


15 00 


S9 


is 36 


434 21 


26 74 


7 43 


4 55 


92 94 


3 61 


23 55 


2 6S 


3 50 


7 87 


37 47 


44 22 


3 05 


lfm r.i, 


122 29 


10 00 


3 00 


10 00 


2 00 


2 64 


13 50 


516 25 


244 40 


9 99 


46 60 


164 95 


1 00 


1 67 


4 39 


SO 


42 90 


15 75 


2 f 5 


1 « 


4 44 


2 70 


3 15 


21 00 


7 50 


2 34 


S 00 


74 70 


14 00 


30 


71 35 


10 


16 


11 is 


23 


19 64 


2 10 


6 25 


30 30 


2 os 


11 25 


2 10 


68 10 


3.722 72 


12 82 


3,709 90 



14S 



DEP1HTUEXI OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 19Q6 



Kingston — Continued. 



Maintenance of Machinery. 



Air'chamber. 1 

Asbestos plaster. 6 bags 

Ajax metal. 19} lbs 

Belting, leather. 754 ft. G in 

Belting, rubber. 6S ft. 6 in 

Boiler doorarches 

Boiler tubes. 9 ft 

compound. 219 lbs 

Boiler, repairs to 

Boiler, inspection 

Brushes, flue, 6 

Brick, fire. 1.000 

5f lbs 

Brass rod 

ring 

Belt fasteners. 200 

grease, 13 

.- issorti I 8,794 lbs 

Clay. fire, Ii tons 

Coupli- 

Castings, bra?s. 9 lbs 

Cotton waste. 301 lbs 

Disks. Jenkins. 10S 

Extractor, rubber, 2 pairs 

Firebox blocks 

Governor, bearings for 

Gauges, steam, 1 

glasses. 30 

. cup. 150 lbs 

Gear wheel. 1 

Grease, axle, § gros 



Hose, steam, and couplings, 50 ft. . 

Labour 

Lead. red. 25 lbs 

Leather, lace. 17f lbs 

Mud box. 1 

Oil. machine. 88J galls 

Oil. engine. 135.57 galls 

Oil, cylinder. 211.87 galls 

Packing, plumbago, 22 lbs 

Packing, asbestos rubber, 1 , 

Packing. E.B.. 4 lbs 

Pulley-, v, i. 5 

Plumbago, flake. 5 lbs 

Rivets, copper. 7} lbs 

Rivets, iron, oo lbs 

Rubber, sheet. 106 lbs 

Rubber rings. 3 doz 

Sponges, 1 4 doz 

Steam trap and connection 

Sheet, ISO lbs 

■ ■-!, 1 

Tallow. 25 lbs 

hard rubber, 164; lbs 

air. 75 lbs 

Freight and cartage 



Altai 

Beeswax, 36 lbs 

!, 12 yds 

6 lbs 



Prayer book-. 3 doz. . 



irgan 





.' 



S cts. 

9 75 

7 50 

5 7 s 

180 IS 

29 24 

30 00 
3 32 

3 20 
40 00 
12 00 
33 50 

1 73 

15 

1 ii.-, 

4 Ml 

10 25 

IS 00 

4 us 

2 70 
33 11 

24 4S 

5 MM 

25 (HI 
1 

5il 

3 50 

11 13 
2 50 

4 110 
15 00 
35 65 
65 60 

1 11 
11 54 

4 00 

23 90 

04 53 

122 9s 

7 70 

11 25 

2 40 
s 2 1 
1 25 

1 us 

2 43 
79 50 

9 00 

12 30 

ii.", mi 

1 75 

l'.i si I 

75 mi 

s 11 



1,548 so 



4 


511 


is 







00 


3 




o 


•III 


12 


96 


3 


nn 


82 


25 


l 


25 





25 


134 


11 



School. 



Copybooks, 6 doz. 

Slates, 1} doz. . . . 



Library. 
Books and magazines. 



Ofpcr ■ 

Billheads. 3.500 

Containers 

Ink, 10 galls 

Postage stamps 

Printing department account . . 
Stationery department account 
Premium on officers bonds. . . . 

Telegrams 

Telephone service 

Telephone (long distance) 

Freight and express 



Farm. 

Bran. 1 .000 lbs 

Brushes, horse, 1 doz. . . . 

Boar, 1 

Corn. 200 bush 

Hoes, 1 doz 

11 urn.--. 2 -cts 

Hose. 12 ft 

Horse. 1 

Implements, parts of 

Manure 

Plough. 1 

Hakes, hay, 1 doz 

Steel tire. 57 lbs 

Salt. 1 brl 

Seeds, various 

Sulphate of copper, 100 lbs 

Tedder. 1 

Threshing grain 

Veterinary service 

nghogs 

i and express 



Trade Shops. 

Awls, 7 gross 

\ \ Is, blades, 2 doz 

Acid, oxalic, 1 lb 

Benzine, 20 galls 

Brushes, whitewash, 3 doz . . 

Brushes, kal 

Brushes, varnish, 2j doz .. . . 

'.do/ 

Brushes, paint, 3 doz 

h '1. 3 doz .. . . 

BoltS, I :ir. 7HII 

tire 1,400 

Bolts, stove, 200 

Bends, i lbs 

Buttons, troiis, >r. 12 gn 
Buttons, crown gilt, 10 gross 
Buckles, harness, 1 1 gro-- . . 

Buckles, belt. 1 gross 



Bottom buffers. 1 doz 

v. 252 j yds 

Burning kiln 



S cts. 



1 si I 

il 75 



48 51 



1 00 

126 nn 

221 ss 
21 s n; 
24 00 
27 22 
172 92 
27 05 
52 20 



ssr, 42 



9 50 

2 74 
20 00 

in; 00 

3 60 
2 20 

■ 

175 00 

25 15 

109 20 

14 00 

2 04 

1 51 

1 25 

106 23 

7 50 

45 no 

77 sn 

11 50 

9 05 



741 97 



s 70 
n 60 

ii m 
s mi 
7n 
78 

si I 
30 
30 
92 
7 35 

,i ;,i 
l 62 
1 20 

1 01 

6 nn 

1 ss 

2 nil 
ids 34 

7 50 



11 
5 

7 
1 
7 
4 
5 



EXPENDITURE 



147 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Kingston— Continued. 



Trade Shops — Continued. 

Bags. 100 

Belting. 15 ft 

Bristles. 1 lb 

Bits. \ doz 

Braid, gold. 2 yds 

Carbolic acid. 131 lbs 

Corn, broom, 1 .612 lbs 

Cotton, warp. 275 lbs 

Coal, run of mine. 1.555':;.;^, 

Coal, blacksmith's, 2. 195 tons 

Colours. lbs 

Chalk. 75 lbs. 

Chalk, tailors. * boxes 

Castings, sundrv. 455 lbs 

Castings, bed. 2.556 lbs 

Chisels. 5 doz 

Cement, leather, H doz 

dynamite, 59 

<>il. 100 bush 

Cloth, bookbinders, 3 rolls 

Cloth, scarlet. 11+ 3-ds 

Canvas. 75 yds 

Collar check. 2 yds 

Cutters, wire, 2 prs 

Drills, shank. 7 doz 

Drills, taper shank twist, 3 § doz . . . 

Drills, twist. 3+ doz 

Dvnamite. 60 sticks 

Dies. S 

Duck. 5 vds 

Emery flour, 601 lbs 

Emery wheels. 2S 

Emery straps, 2 doz 

Emerv cloth. 1 ream 

Eyelets, 24 box 

Fuse. 1.200 ft 

Files, assorted. 1SJ doz 

Farmer's satin. 81+ yds 

Flannel, military. 324A yds 

Fitches. \ doz 

Faucet, oil. 1 

Glue. 705 lbs 

Gasoline. 60 galls 

Graining fluid. 6 tins 

Glycerine, 1+ lbs 

Gum, tragacant, 2 lbs 

Handles, broom 1,000 

Handles, sledge, 8 doz 

Handles, hammer, 6 doz 

Handles, hammer, machine, 2 doz. . 

Handles, pick. 7 doz 

Handles, awl. 31 doz 

Hammers, shoe, 10 

Hammers, claw. + doz 

Hammers, horseshoeing, 1 

hoes, 200 lbs 

Handkerchiefs, silk, 6 doz 

Hooks and eyes. gate. 1 gross 

Hooka and eyes, tailor's, 1 gn is 

Hooks, shoe .12 boxes 

Hair cloth .75 vds 

Hardash. 2 lbs. 

Heel shave blades, 1 doz 

Hat-, felt. 94 

Hub-. 1 set 

Hickory. 1 piece 

galvanized, 385 lbs 

Iron, bar. 7,848 lbs 

Iron. Russian, 357 lb- 

Iron, band, 50 lb- 

Iron, angle, 5.145 lbs 

Iron, refined, 2,980 lbs 

Italian cloth, 40 yds 

Kettlt bottom, 1. 

34—10+ 



- 






25 
|32 


4 


8 


50 





40 


o 


mi 


3 


93 


111 


54 


68 


. 5 


4.1 S3 


:■;,-, 


18 


SS 





'.III 


1 


05 


2 


24 


31 


13 


153 


36 


11 


38 


2 


25 





m; 


IS 


, 5 


14 


16 


34 


50 


11 


25 


1 


31 i 


1 


on 


15 


91 


16 


69 


15 


S2 


15 


00 


17 


2u 


3 


llll 


30 


1 1.- 


92 


86 


4 


mi 


15 


67 


3 


60 


10 


50 


14 


43 


40 


1 o 


170 


36 





:-;.-, 





45 


58 


16 


21 


i.i. 





66 





3( i 


1 


20 


17 


DM 


|9 


86 


1 o 


67 


17 


IS 


20 


6 


55 


3 


96 


2 


511 


95 


9 


III! 


72 


MM 


1 


54 





-•ii 


4 


20 


18 


75 


9 


30 


5 


00 


94 


00 


3 


10 


1 


25 


15 


112 


146 


i.:; 


39 


^ 


1 


ii; 


91 


;i 


96 


35 


20 


in 


20 



Trcu OI1 t,iii Ue( i. 

Knives, farriers, 4 

Knives,|F.W.C, 7 doz 

Knives, guard, 

Knives, skiving, 1 doz 

Knives, sole leather, 1 

Knives, welt, + doz 

Lines, mason's, 2 doz 

Lines, deep sea, 17} lbs 

Lines, cotton, 50 lbs 

Lumber, pine, 1S.336 ft 

Locks, prison, 27 

Labour 

Linen, stay, 94 yds 

boot, 2 gross 

56 prs 

Leather, beading, 9 skins 

Leather, harness, 64J lbs 

Leather, French kip. 190+ lbs . 
Leather, dongola kid, 41 lbs . . . 

Leather, box calf. 44} lbs 

Leather, roan skins, 2 doz 

Leather, pebble cow, 214} ft . . 

Leather, welt. 60 lbs 

Leather, upper, 93 lbs 

Leather, sole. 390} lbs 

Leather, lace. 14§ lbs 

Leather, sheepskin, 27+ lbs . . . 

Leather, belt. 179+ ft .". 

Matches. } gross 

Marline. 2 doz 

Millboard. 300 sheets 

Machinery, parts of 

Measur* doz 

Mallets, stone, 1 doz 

Nails, horseshoe, 1 box 

Nails, horseshoe, 75 lbs 

Nails, finishing, 1 keg 

Nails, boot, 30 lbs 

Nails, trunk. 1 lb 

Needles, sewing. 250 papers . . . 
Needles, darning. V doz papers. 

Needles, machine, 17 doz 

Needles, knitting. 144 

Needles, harness. 4 pkgs 

Nuts, hex., 175 lbs 

Nuts, square, 50 lbs 

Nippers, wire, 1 pr 

Nippers, plates for, 1 pr 

Oil, machine. SS+ galls 

Oil, sperm, 20 galls 

Oil, hard finish. 5 galls 

Pincers, hollow, 6 prs 

Pincers, shoemaker's, 10 prs.. . 

Pencils, carpenter, 10 doz 

Paper, printing, 530 lbs 

Paper, writing, 20} reams. . . . 

Paper, manilla, 1 ream 

Paper, 4 rolls 

Paper, blue print. 3 rolls 

Paper, sand. 3 reams 

Punch, single spring, 1 , 

Punch, tubes. 4 doz 

Plyers, 2 pr- 

Powder, blasting, 12 kegs 

Putty, 401 lbs. 

boxwood, 5} doz 

iron, llii'. lbs 

Rivets, copper, li> lbs 

3 

-hoe. 3 doz 

horse. + doz 

Rope, manill .■!. 103 lbs 

Staple-, broom, 15 lbs 

.Scythe Stones, 1 doz.] 



8 cts. 

1 04 

10 88 
1 30 
3 25 

40 

1 50 

1 70 

2 80 
17 50 

436 53 
17n 20 
77 05 

15 80 

2 5(i 
22 24 

I i , .". 

16 S4 
ls7 ii:; 

Iji si i 

I 1 s7 
2H 16 
30 00 
19 20 
30 69 
93 66 

9 IS 

9 63 

39 43 

1 06 

3 48 

11 12 

3 62 

3S 

II 47 

2 50 

6 65 

4 00 

1 50 
i. 67 
n 25 

30 

3 35 

3 65 

1 20 
in 20 

2 us 

1 75 

4 00 

5 50 

60 
5 00 

2 00 
43 88 
v; 86 

12 72 

1 75 
11 12 

O CO 

5 1 5 

92 

7 112 
In si 

4 14 

5 12 

7 so 

15 to 

1 50 
1 00 



148 



DEPARTUEST OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Kingston — Continued. 



Trade Shops — Continued. S cts. 

Scoops, 2 doz 20 08 

Shovels, 4 doz 32 45 

Steel, cast, 339i lbs 45 21 

Steel, machine. 450 lbs 11 93 

Steel, self -hardening, 32 lbs 16 00 

Steel, annealed, 25} lbs 6 37 

Steel, toe calk. 131 lbs 6 12 

Steel, spring, 37 lbs 1 48 

Steel, milled, 9,624 lbs 158 85 

- el, hard rod, 555 lbs 11 46 

Steel, sheet, 102 lbs 3 47 

Steel, barrier, 16,035 lbs 1.213 94 

Steel, chisel, 15 lbs 3 00 

Screws, 41 gross 9 89 

Screws, set, 125 lbs 1 59 

Silesia, 166 yds 34 ;.". 

Subscription to American Tailor. . . 5 00 

Subscription to Power 2 00 

Silk, machine. 3 lbs 1-S 75 

Silk, twist, 1 lb 4 50 

Silk, sewing, 1 lb 10 oo 

Sewing machines, 2 i S3 00 

Sewing machines, parts for 1 64 

Steel shanks, 2 gross 1 50 

Starch, laundry, 43 lbs 2 58 

Starch, corn, 3 lbs 15 

Scales, architect's, 2 1 S4 

Straightedge, tailor's, 1 1 25 

Socks, wool. 7 prs 1 54 

Sewing awl blades, 2 gross 3 00 

Saws. .buck, 1 75 

Sponges, i. doz 25 

Trowels, 1 doz r, tip 

'laps, hand, 3 sets 4 20 

Taps, taper machine, 4 1 00 

Tin, Canada plate, 8 boxes 19 60 

Tin, coke, 1 box 4 25 

Tin, charcoal, 2 boxes 12 15 

Tin. block, 118 boxes 37 76 

Thread, shoe, 23 lbs 21 71 

Thread, cotton, 6 gross 28 84 

Thread, linen, 67 lbs 123 10 

Twist, machine, 2 lbs 12 50 

Twist, buttonhole, 4 lbs 18 00 

Tweed, 229J yds 132 IS 

Torch, 1 5 50 

Tacks, 2 doz. papers o Co 

Tacks, shoe, lbs I 1 Hi i 

Tacks, broom, 9 lbs 90 

Twin,-. 12 lbs 4 32 

Tape, 6 gross 1 1 ill i 

Thimbles, wire 25 

Varnish, carriage, 2 galls 5 50 

Washers. 130 lbs 6 88 

Welding compound, 80 lbs s 00 

Wax, 1 '-, H", lbs 4 211 

Wax. black. 20 lbs 2 mi 

Wrenches, Coes, 4 3 99 

Wrenches, Stittson, -3 j 4 55 

- I i imo, 1 50 

Wrenches, parts for 1 95 

Wheels, cutter, 18 2 82 

Wheels, wagon 24 70 

Wire, spools, 9 75 

Wire, steel .spring, 5,470 lbs 237 u7 

Wire, broom, 11 lbs 2 86 

loth, 260 it .._ 

Weavin and fittings, 1 .. <■> 25 

Wood, soft, in 1 cords ! 47 25 

Webbing, gaiter. 12 rolls -'in 

Waddini II 00 

Yarn, 3H lbs 12 60 

Custom entries L 75 

Containers 3 40 [I 



Trade Shops — Concluded. 



Freight and express. . 
Cartage 



157 82 

12 50 



Less — Refund of expenditure 



11,387 04 

418 03 



10,969 01 
Binder Twine. 

Advertising 583 37 

Ammonia, 1S6 lbs 1 4 SS 

Bristol board, S00 sheets 20 00 

Belting, leather. 45 ft 34 54 

Bobbins, 365 90 03 

Brass, sheet, 5A lbs I 1 49 

Bushing 3 30 

Coal, run of mine, 485 tons 1,303 12 

Castings. 596} lbs 27 65 

Cogs, 37 5 00 

Cardboard, 200 sheets 7 00 

Exchange 1 02 

Flyer heads, 12 36 00 

Gears. 1 10 00 

Hessian, 2,351* vds 162 16 

Labour '. .' 18 40 

Oil, cordage. 6.773 galls 677 30 

Oil, machine, 43 galls 11 70 

Pullev, wood, 1 il 4(i 

Patterns, 2 1 20 

Pulpboard, 100 pes 3 42 

Rules, caliper, 2 3 50 

Printing 7 25 

Railway and steamboat guide 1 00 

Repairing scales 3 00 

Balling machine and rings, 8 ] 10 13 



Manilla hemp — 

35,857 lbs. at 10£C. . 3.S99 45 
31,670 lbs. at life. . 3,681 64 



Less discount for 70 
days at 6 p.c. per 
annum 



7,581 09 



S7 23 



67,092 lbs. at 10J c. . 7,296 25 
Less discount for 70 

days at 6 p.c. per 

annum S3 95 



31,320 lbs. at lOtc. . 3,406 05 
Less discount for 50 

days at 6 p.c. per 

annum 28 00 

2,282 lbs. at 9}c 

11,604 lbs. at 10f $1,261 93 

allowance on 540 
lbs 2 94 



l.j.'.s 99 
Less discount for 3(1 
daj S at 6 p.c. i" I 
annum 7 45 

Shipping tags, s.oOO 

Spreader link! 50 

I u ine ' i I 100 

pes 

imps 



3,042 86 



7.493 S6 



7.212 30 



[,378 
222 49 



1,251 54 

6 60 

17 .".o 
is? .".o 
264 15 
123 60 



EXPEMUl F i;r: 



149 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Kingston — Continued. 



Binder Twine — Concluded. 

uns 

i 

Soap stock, 1,073 lbs 

Tar. 14 brls 

rs, spool head. 20 lbs. . . 

Customs entries 

Containers 

Cartage. . \ 



Prison Furnishing. 

Blankets. 99 

Bed and springs. 2 

' .-inn. twilled. 1.250 vds .. 

Duck, 13 yds '. 

Felt. hair. 900 sq. ft 

Linen, table. 2.5 yds 

Soap, shaving. 20 lbs 

Soap, castile, 3.059 lbs .... 

Ticking. 327} yds 

Wire, cotter. 3. 5 lbs 

Customs entries 

Containers 

Freight and express 



Prison Utensils. 

Armoury, care of 

Basins, enamelled 

Bath bricks. 2 doz 

Brushes, scrubbing. 6 doz 

Brushes, shoe. 2 doz 

Brushes, shaving, li doz 

Bed pans. 3 

Baskets, clothes. 1 

Cartridges, 2,000 

Clippers, hair, 1 pr 

Cabinet oven, parts for 

Clock*, repairs to 

Combs. 1 doz 

Dishes, butter, 1 doz 

Gups and saucers, 3 doz 

Dishes, cups, agate, 1 doz 

Dishes, plates, agate, 4 doz 

Ewers, i doz 

Dusters, 1 

Firearms, parts for 

Grindstone. 1 

Ink marking, 1 bottle 

Jugs. 5 

Kettles, S 

Kettles, cooking, steam, 4 

Knives, table, 1 doz 

Knives, butcher, t doz 

Lantern globes. 1 doz 

Lamp chimneys, 10 doz 

Line, cotton. 5 lbs 

Mats, 1 

Pails, dinner. 1} doz 

Potato machine, parts for 

Pot, porridge, 1 

• lothes. 13 doz 

Pans. oven. 2 

Razors, 2 doz 

Razor strops, 1 doz 

Range, repairs to and parts of 

Range. 1 

bbers, deck. 2 doz 

pans, enamelled, 2 

i ection of and repairs to 



S cts. 


4 86 

932 75 

4U 24 

65 87 

3 00 


2 50 

2 7.5 
106 6S 


24,359 10 


222 7.5 


16 00 


140 62 


3 64 


49 50 


12 50 


7 00 


305 90 


64 73 


20 63 


75 


1 00 


10 61 


855 63 


48 00 


SO 


1 00 


11 52 


5 56 


4 57 


3 30 


1 50 


15 00 


3 00 


10 20 


6 75 


2 58 


25 


2 90 


1 80 


4 25 


2 10 


50 


5 83 


88 


25 


2 80 


4 10 


825 00 


2 00 


. 1 59 


75 


5 80 


1 50 


4 li>) 


21 00 


1 50 


65 


25 


70 


22 mi 


5 50 


67 .57 


56 (HI 


6 50 


1 20 


34 05 



Prison Utensils — Concluded. 

Spoons, table. 2 gross 

Spoons, enamelled, 6 

Shovels, snow, 13 

Shaft, 1 

Saw-web, 2J ft 

Shears, pruning, 1 pr 

Scissors, 6 prs 

Steel, butcher's, 1 

Twine, 15 lbs 

Typewriter carriage 

Taps, oil, 1 

Tin. charcoal, 1 box 

Urinals, 2 

Wicks, oil stove, 6 

Wicks, lamp, 2 rolls 

Customs entries 

Freight and express 



Buildings. 



Basins, brass. 156 

Burning lime kiln 

Buffers. 10J lbs 

Bolts, stove, 1.000 

_•■;. 14.896 lbs 

Cement, 900 brls 

Crosses and tees 

Closets. 1 

. 548 

Expanded metal. 5,253 sq. ft , 
Electric fittings — 

Cable, B. and C, 850 ft 

Wire. R.S., 5,000 ft 

Fusible switches, 6 

Flex, cord, 100 yds 

Bryant sockets, ISO 

Cleats, 900 prs 

Tubes. 110 prs 

Tape, Grimshaw, 10 lbs . . . 

Solder, 65 lbs 

Rosettes 180 

Main cut-outs, 48 

Bracket tubes, 196 

Glass. 4 cases 

Iron, angle, 12,25Slbs 

Iron. bar. 11.445 lbs 

Iron, galvanized, 2,944 lbs . . . 

Lever cocks, 160 

Lead. pig. 2,225 lbs 

Lumber, pine. 3,445 ft 

Nails, wire. 5 kegs 

.184 

Pipe, wrought iron, 4,206 ft . . 

Pulleys, sash, 15 doz 

Rivets, 50 lbs 

Sand, 715J yds 

Screw-, 12 gross 

Rug, rubber, 1 

Travelling expenses 

Traps, brass, 1.52 

Screws, clean-out, 21 

-. brass, gate, 2 

Unions, 160 

Customs entries 

Freight and express 

Cartage 



-5 cts. 

6 00 
60 

5 77 
90 
il 17 

50 
.5 17 

1 00 
3 84 

23 00 
n 45 

6 25 
1 10 

40 

1 30 
50 

2 40 



1,255 85 



Advertising . 



7 50 

11 93 
4 46 

897 3S 

1,750 00 

14 04 

8 00 
66 74 

470 SS 

122 25 

30 00 

3 00 

27 90 

]!• 7.5 

3 10 
8 00 

13 00 

32 40 
19 20 
23 00 
13 83 

239 03 

228 19 

122 IS 

152 mi 

77 SS 

77 52 

10 30 

4 96 
396 75 

13 96 

2 13 
610 70 

3 48 
1 75 

33 95 
431 68 

13 25 
is 56 
43 20 

64 30 

12 00 

6,382 38 

332 42 



150 



DEPARTMEXT OE JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



Kingston — Continued. 



Travelling Expenses. 


81 50 


Travelling Expenses — Concluded. 
Miscellaneous, special — 


S cts. 




1,148 03 | Rifle and revolver practice, prizes 


50 00 


Less — Refund of expenditure 




9 00 


1.229 53 Legal services 


S 50 




• 
Total 


7^ 50 




1,131 18 






146,447 50 



RECAPITULATION. 



Staff- 



Salaries and retiring allowances 
Uniforms and mess 



Maintenance of Convicts — 

Rations 

Clothing and medicines 

Discharge Expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances 
Transfer and interment 



War ing Expenses — 

Heat, light and water 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery . 

>pels, schools and library 

Office expenses 



S cts. 

61,593 49 
4,499 84 



13.204 37 
4,782 82 



2,458 63 
342 17 



7,126 85 
5,258 70 

1SS 17 



■ les — 

Farm 

Trade shops 

Binder twine 

nl — 

Furnishing 

Utensils and vehicles 

Land, buildings and walls . 



Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel. 
ial 



741 


97 


10,969 


01 


24.359 


10 


855 


63 


1 .255 


85 


6,382 


38 


1,463 


60 


7^ 


50 



- 



66,093 33 



17,987 19 



2,800 SO 



13.460 14 



36,071.. i - 



■ 



1,542 10 



Total 140.447 50 



EXPENDITURE 



151 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



St. Vincent de Paul. 



2,400 


00 


1,599 


90 


2,400 


nil 


1,200 


00 


925 


00 


mm 


llll 


soo 


llll 


soo 


00 


600 


00 


750 


mi 


59S 


'.U 


SOO 


Mil 


1,498 


.".I 


500 


llll 


4.900 


00 


524 


97 


5S3 


30 


602 


16 


1 ,000 


iiu 



Salaries, General. 

Warden, I year 

Surgeon, 1 year 

< ihaplains, 2, 1 year 

Accountant, 1 year 

Engineer, 9 mos. at $900, 3 inos. at 

$1,000 

Storekeeper, 1 year 

Steward. 1 year 

Warden's clerk, 1 year 

Assistant storekeeper, 1 year 

Hospital overseer, 1 year 

Electrician, 9 mos. at SS00 

School instructor 

Firemen, 3, less 1 day, at 8500 

Messenger, 1 year 

Industrial. 

Trade instructors, 7, 1 year, at $700 

Trade instructor, 1, 9 mos 

Trade instructor, 1, 10 mos 

Trade instructor, I, 10$ mos 

Stable guards, 2, 1 year, at $500. . . 

Police. 



it v warden. 1 year 1,500 00 

Chief keeper, 1 year 1,200 00 

6 at $600, 1 year 

Keeper. 1 at SOOO, S mos 

Keeper, 1 , 5 mos 

Keeper, 1 at $600, 4J mos 

Keeper, 4 mos 

Keeper, 1 (less deduction), 1 year . 

Keeper, 2 mos 

Guards at 8500. 20, 1 year 

Guard, 7 mos. at $500 

Guard, S mos. at S500 

Guard, 10 mos. at 1500 

Guards, 6 (less deduction) 

i luard, 1 . 9 mos 

Guard, 1 , 8 mos 

Guards, 1 for 1 1 mos 

Guard, 1 for G mos 

Temporary officers — 

10 officers, broken periods 



/,'. tiring Allowances 

i luard, H. Roger , 

Keeper, J. B. Lemay 

Keeper. Gilbert Chartrand 

Instructor, Ed. Kenny 

Instructor, D. Oborne 

Guard, D. J. McLellan 
Guard, B. Letang 



Uniforms. 

Belt buckles. 1 

Braid, mohair, 2 gross . . . . 
Braid, Russian, 1 gross . . . 

Buttons, 1 set 

Buttons, 11} gross 

Canvas. 294.1 yds 

Crown badge. 1 

Cheviot. 2J yds 

ic, + gall 

Cloth, blue serge, 085} yds 

Cloth, Bcarlet, 4 yds 

Cloth, tweed. 3 yds 

Cut cork, '-' pea , 



3,600 


00 


400 


00 


250 


00 


236 


67 


200 


00 


578 


34 


100 


00 


10.000 


00 


291 


66 


333 


33 


431 


99 


2.97S 


44 


374 


94 


331 


28 


4:.s 


26 


249 


96 


1,354 


67 


48,252 


38 


562 


41 


1.14S 


84 


1,308 


34 


1,560 


33 


1 , 182 


62 


595 


4(1 


347 


54 


7,005 


4S 





25 


16 


30 


7 


20 





75 


29 


65 


49 


26 


1 


nil 


11 


69 


2 


00 


1 .405 


00 


10 


40 


7 


05 





30 



( " n i [arms — Concluded. 

Crowns, bronze, 4 prs 

Crowns, gold, 1 prs 

Cap bands ,60 

Duck, 90} yds 

Drugs 

Elastic, shoe, 10 yds 

Felt, tarred, 5 yds 

Farmer's satin, 230 yds 

Frieze, 96 yds 

Felt, shoe, 5 yds 

Gutta percha, 1 V lbs 

Gloves, 1 pr 

Gauntlets, 1 pr 

Gimp, mohair, 15 yds 

Hair sealskins, 38 skins 

Hard ash, 4 lbs 

Hats, cowboy. 7.V doz 

Hats, Stetson. 2". 

Holland. 42yds 

Leather, Scotch pebble, 77J ft 
Leather, Can. calf, 190A lbs . . 

Leather, welt, 44 lbs 

Leather, sole, 875 lbs 

Leather, French calf, S4J lbs . 

Leather, dongola, 39f ft 

Mitts. 4 doz. pr 

Olivets. 2 doz 

Persian lamb skins, IS 

Rubber soles and heels, 1 pr . . 

Stars, bronze, 2 pr 

Stars, gold, 1 pr 

Shoe 'aces. 1 gross 

Silk, twist, 2f yds 

Silk, machine, S lbs 

Steel shanks. 2 doz 

Silesia, 123* yds 

Wadding, 36i) yds 

Waterproof coats, 3 

Waterproof capes, 48 

Webbing, 12 pes 

Varnish, boot. 2 galls 

Postage 

Freight and express 

' :i' md boxes 



Less — Refund of expenditure 



Mess. 

Apples, evaporated, 100 lbi 

Baking soda, 10 lbs 

Baking powder, 1 A doz . . . 
Baking powder, 10 lbs. . . . 

Butter, 1.641 lbs 

1,2 17 lbs 

Cornstarch, 1 lb 

Essence, lemon, 1 lb 

Eggs, 90 doz 

Fresh fish. 292 lbs 

Ginger, 30 lbs 

Lemon peel. 1 lb 

Malta vitie, 1 pkg 

Milk, 163$ gait 

Raisins, 196 lbs 

Sugar. 2 lbs 

Sac... 25 lbs 

. 15 lbs 

Tea. ,1b 



3 


III"! 


*j 


nil 


4 


SO 


17 


3-? 




90 


7 


50 


1 


nil 


92 


00 


120 


00 


1 


(10 


4 


.-,.1 


2 


25 


3 


mi 


5 


25 


161 


40 


19 


00 


91 


93 


10 




o 


46 


13 


22 


127 


64 


12 


32 


2nl 


25 


97 


is 


11 


93 


80 


00 


1 




124 


00 





i 5 


1 


50 


2 


00 


ii 




9 


33 


26 


mi 


n 


50 


12 


35 


16 


20 


25 


1 5 


ins 


00 


4 


Sll 


1 


50 





04 


18 


42 


3 


55 


2,993 


56 


1 


18 


2,992 


3S 


6 


00 





60 


4 


50 





60 


295 


47 


185 


40 





10 


1 


00 


19 


34 


18 


53 


9 


25 





40 





15 


31 


55 


12 


74 





08 


1 


50 





90 







588 


31 



152 



DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1905 



St- Vincent de Paul — Continued. 



Rations. 

Barley, 1,960 lbs 

Beans, 5,040 lbs 

Beef, 41, 90S lbs 

Cabbage, 303 hds 

Christmas extras .... 

Fish, cod, 400 lbs 

Fish, herrings, 12 brls 

Flour. 1.025 lbs 

Lard, 2.24S lbs 

Molasses, 1 .400 galls. . 

Mutton, 2,722 lbs 

Onions, 1.322 lbs 

Oatmeal. 5,580 lbs . . . 
Pork, boneless, 20 brls 

Pepper, 465 lbs 

Potatoes. 1,500 bags . 

Rice, 3.000 lbs 

Split pease, 7,546 lbs . 

Salt. 125 bags 

Sugar. 7,1 68 lbs 

Tea, 760 lbs 

Turnips, 15 bags .... 
Vinegar. 103, ^ galls. . 

Yeast, 208 lbs 

Freight and express. . 



Less — Refund of expenditure 



Cloth ing. 

Binding, stay, 9 gross 

Buckles, 6 gross .' 

Buttons, S3 gross' 

Burrs, 1 lb 

Cloth, prison, 540| yds 

Cloth, cheese, 379 yds' 

Cotton, twilled, 246J yds 

Cot t,,n, gray, 545$ yds 

Denim, striped, 349* yds 

Drilling, 61 yds 

Farmer- satin, l^l} vds 

Galatea 1 ,845j yds ." 

Gum. 2 lbs 

Gingham, 99* yds 

Ink, 12 bottles 

Ink. 4 galls 

Lasting tacks, 15 gross 

Leather, Canadian calf. 25S lbs 
Leather, porpoise. 27 A, lbs 

Leather, split, 322 lbs 

Leather, cowhide, 517 lbs 

Leather, sole, 2,104 lbs 

Leather, welt, 26 lbs 

Mothballs, 20 lbs 

50 lbs 

Xails. iron. 100 lbs 

, copper, 2 lbs 

ii, 1 bush 

Rubber cement, 6 cans 

Sheep skins, 267 lbs 

Shoe tacks, 50 lbs 

1, linen, 10 lbs 

Thread 18 lbs 

! i gross 

Thread I lbs 

I. ma. 1 1 inc. 20 lbs 

200 doz 

w 

■ lbs 

Casing, Sec 



S cts. 

41 16 

151 20 

2,392 M 

Is 18 

22 36 

IS 00 

72 00 

4,151 25 

202 32 

405 86 

150 SS 

46 06 

153 45 

47 1 

69 75 

97 50 

* 6S i 5 

286 72 

140 60 

15 00 

28 41 

62 40 

11 59 



10,266 SO 
35 60 



10.231 20 



■1 ii.", 

1 40 

8 10 

ii 60 

310 64 

16 U 
26 72 
42 30 
90 S7 

6 in 

17 70 

1 50 
12 69 

2 4ii 

1 si I 

; ;.i 

1 19 64 

17 ss 

r,l in 

170 in 

183 92 

7 28 
ii 80 



50 
50 

2il 
10 
40 



4 
4 

1 

1 

2 
so 95 

7 nil 
21 50 
I 5 16 

s7 HI 
1 75 

13 10 



Clothing — Concluded 



Freight and express. 
Postage 



Less — Refund of expenditure! 






Medicines, &c. 

Acid, oxalic, 1 lb 

Apples, 2 bush 

Apples, 2 cans 

Buckwheat, H lbs 

Butter, 402 lbs 

Biscuits, mixed, 4 lbs 

Corn. 13 cans 

Currants, 2 lbs 

Clinical thermometers, 2. . . 

Drugs 

Eggs. 27 doz 

Force, 1 pkg 

Fluid beef, 10 tins 

Fowl, 1 

Jelly powder, 4 pkgs 

Methylated spirits, 10 galls 

Mustard. 4S lbs 

Milk, 960 galls 

Xeatsfoot oil, 5 galls 

Nutmegs, * lb 

Orange meat, 2 pkg 

Truss, double, 1 

Professional seryiees 

Syringe, 1 

Sugar, wliite, 60 lbs 

Salmon. 1 can 

Soda biscuits, 15 boxes . . . 
Sulpherated potash, 5 lbs. , 

Spectacles, 2 pairs 

Tomatoes, 2 cans 

Tapioca, 2 lbs. 

Wine, 1 gall 

Tobacco, 1S9 lbs 



Freedom Suits. 

Brown Holland. 49 yards 

Buttons. 16 gross 

10 doz 

1 yards 

Eyelets, 25 m 

Flannel, 1 ,114 yard 
Gloves, 4} doz 

.. buff. 173 lbs. . . 

Mat-, felt, doz 

l [andkerchiefs, 3 doz. . . . 

i . sole. N75 lbs. . . 
Leather, welt, 20J lbs. . . 

\ails. zinc, 10 lbs 

Silesia, 130 lbs 

Rivets, shoe. 15 lbs 

Tweed, 1,168 yards 

lies. 13} doz 

Wadding. 720 yards. . . . 

Haling 

Freight and expres 



Travel and Allowance. 

138 



S ets. 



13 56 

17 



3 313 19 
21 65 



3,291 54 



15 

1 25 
24 
06 

76 40 

4S 

1 63 

24 

1 50 
367 77 

6 92 

15 

3 00 

1 00 
40 

11 00 

9 60 

is i 28 

4 00 
20 
30 

2 50 
60 00 

90 

3 54 

13 
3 95 

1 50 
3 25 
26 
20 
3 00 

S5 05 



834 85 



l\ so 

3 04 

10 00 

5 00 

133 93 

56 
20 76 
25 50 

i 20 

Jill 25 

1 30 
19 36 

1 35 

loj 96 

9 s ( 

32 in 

I S5 

II L'll 



011 21 



osi :;n 



EXPEXDITUHE 



153 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



St. Vincent de Paul— Continued. 



Transfers, &c. 

Transfers to Kingston, 3 

Digging grave 

Freight and express 



Heat, Light and Water. 

Burners. 1 doz 

Coal oil. 124* galls 

Coal, run of mine, 1.SC4.1040 tons 
Coal, screenings, 102.1150 tons. 

Coal, egg, 152 tons 

Electric lamps, 060 

Grimshaw tape, 5 lbs 

Labour. 2 days 

Professional sendees 

Matches, 10 gross 

Freight and express 



$ cts. 



Less — Refund of expenditure 



Maintenance of Buildings. 

Acid, muriatic, 56 lbs 

Battery zincs, 60 

Babbit metal. 10S lbs 

Butts, brass, 8 doz 

Bronze, 1 paper 

Bronze, 2*. lbs 

Buckles, 4 doz 

Burrs, 2 lbs 

Bolts, 3,312 

Brass, sheet, 9 lbs 

Brads, patent, S doz 

Coal sifter. 1 , 

Chloride of lime, 954 lbs 

Carbons, battery, IS 

Carbons, soled, 500 

Carbolineum, 432$ gall 

Cord, flexible, 262 yards 

Carbon holders, 6 

Copper, bar, 23J lbs 

Canada plate, 12 boxes 

Clamps, hose, 2 

Couplings, hose, 2 

Cloth, wire. 300 ft 

Cable and contact, 12 lbs . . . . 

Chain, 103 ft 

Door for heater, 1 

Door knobs, ^ doz 

Elbows, mal., 2 doz 

Electric fittings 

Electric lamps, .589 

Electric lamps, portable, 4 . . . 

Enierv flour, 20 lbs 

Felt. 3} ft 

Fittings for pipe 

Fuse links. 60 

Globes, outer, 1 doz 

Globes, inner, 210 

1 11a 6 cases 

Gasoline, 5 gall 

Glue, 100 lbs 

Grimshaw tape, 10 lbs 

< Irindstoncs, 425 lbs 

Handles, drawer, 2 

Hard oil finish, * gall 

Hooks, 4} doz 

I lo.ik j and l gross 

I lose, rubber, 150 ft 

-. 2§ doz 

galvanized, 2,757 lbs. .. . 



73 20 


3 00 


86 10 


162 30 


75 


23 34 


7,366 04 


552 76 


957 50 


148 SO 


4 50 


3 00 


.-,ii mi 


4 75 


29 96 


9,141 40 


10 50 


9,130 90 


1 68 


2 40 


21 60 


4 18 


30 


8 50 


5 58 


70 


23 SI 


3 78 


3 31 


20 


29 62 


3 78 


16 50 


432 75 


2n 74 


3 00 


I 86 


28 20 


06 


32 


4 50 


2 85 


2 32 


SO 


1 11 


1 77 


21 91 


105 55 


15 50 


1 60 


4 06 


8 10 


8 28 


9 60 


79 92 


31 21 


2 25 


17 00 


9 00 


5 31 


10 


1 25 


2 65 


1 40 


i l 63 


2 57 


114 16 



Maintenance of Buildings — Con. 

Iron, round, 4,S25 lbs 

Iron, hoop, 100 lbs ) 

Iron, band. 1.6S2 lbs 

Knobs, split. 100 

Keys, steel, 8 

Lumber, 9.168 ft 

Labour (painting") 

Lavatory and fittings 

Lye, 60 doz 

Lead, pig. 547 lbs 

Latches, 2 

Lamp guards, Greenwood, 1 doz.. . 

Locks, 45 

Moss, 25 lbs 

Nuts. 50 lbs 

Nails, 1 1 kegs 

Oil, 141 gall 

Pumice stone, 10 lbs 

Powder, imp. green, 5 lbs 

Push plates, 2 doz 

Pipe, soil, 20 ft 

Pipe, taper, 3 

Pipe, galvanized iron, 1,182+ ft. . . . 

Pipe, tap welded, 37* ft 

Pulls, drawer, 2 doz 

Plugs, iron. 2§ doz 

Paper, tarred, 6 rolls 

Paper, etnery, 1+ reams I 

Plaster Paris, 1 brl . . . .' 

Putz pomade, 4 galls 

Paint. 1.015 lbs 

Paint. S5 galls 

Paint, assorted 

Rubber bumpers, 6 

Rope, 250 ft 

Rivets, 47 lbs 

Reporting on heating system. 3 dys. 

Reporting on heating system, dis- 
bursements 

Salt of ammonia, 25 lbs 

Sockets, 62 

Stoves, coal, 3 

Stoves. 2 

Steel, cast, 1 .058 lbs 

Steel, Firth. 365* lbs 

Shade holders, 1 doz 

Shades, half, V doz 

Shellac, 10 galls 

Spikes, 3 kegs 

Sand paper 

Sash pulleys, 10 doz 

Lodmer phosphate, 121 lbs 

Switches. 30 

Screws. 45 gross 

Soap. 8,311 lbs 

Size, 55 lbs 

Services of night watchman, 4' 
nights j 

Travelling expenses, departmental 
architect 

Taps 

Turpentine, 8S galls 

Tacks. 4 doz 

Toilet paper, 30 boxes 

Tin, 27 boxes 

Tin, 5974 lbs 

Whiting. 672 lbs 

Wall paper, 35 rolls 

White lead, 2,720 lbs 

Welding compound, 50 lbs 

Wire. 3.544* ft 

Wire. 4 11 lbs 

Varnish. 9) galls 

Zinc, 75 lbs i 



- 



84 


s4 


2 


65 


30 




1 




1 


21 


426 


:,:; 


5 


in 


62 


95 


27 


00 


IS 


32 





S.I 


2 


50 


44 


88 


3 


45 


2 


61 


37 


13 


60 


52 


1 


MO 





70 


1 


75 


10 


00 





45 


83 


23 


< 


50 


3 


01 


4 


01 


3 


31 


21 


95 


1 


95 


is 


- 


125 


03 


69 


8 


14 


33 


1 


56 


28 


i 


o 


:;.. 


30 


01 


18 


4ll 


3 


00 


11 


30 


29 


-•■ 


6 


5(1 


103 


06 


38 


59 


n 


40 


2 


H» 


26 


.Mi 


9 


54 


4 


81 


11 


21 


is 


1 ■ 


14 


6 


* 


Hi 


290 


89 


1 




7 


50 


'J.", 


00 


1 




7n 


81 





7 ■; 


193 


20 


ii. i 


25 


1U7 


-■7 


1 


22 


12 


. 






I 


"7 




72 


22 




21 


. .. 


6 





154 



DEPART3IEST OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



St- Vincent pe Paul — Continued. 



Maintenance of Buildings — Con. 

Cans, containers and boxes 

Freight and express 

Postage 



Less — Refund of expenditure 



Maintenance of Machinery 

Armatures, 6 

Belting, leather. 139 ft 

Bushing, 6 doz 

Batteries. 12 A.D 

Boiler inspection, 1 year 

Boiler bends, 2 

Butter ammonia, 1 bottle 

Clutches. 24 

Carbon brushes, 12 

Castings, stove 

-4 lbs 

- brass, blow-off, 2 

Electric packing, 14f lbs 

Fire bricks, 2M 

Fire clay. 1 ton 

Fire clay. 12 bags 

Feed attachment for stokers and 

fittings 

Grate bars and fittings. . .* 

I irease, 227 lbs 

Gauge glasses, 2 doz 

Magnet coils, 12 

Xozzle. 1 . . , 

Oil, cylinder. 249 galls 

.srine, 616J galls 

I >il. lard, 10 galls 

Packing, 22A lbs 

Parts of machinery 

Plates, roll. 24 . 

Rawhide lacing, 32* lbs 

Repairs to steam gauges. 3 

<teel. machine, 209 lbs. 

Spring 

Tampico. 50 lbs 

Valves, globe. 7 

Washers, 90 lbs 

Waste, white, 310 lbs 



Chapels, Schools and Library. 



< lareof chapels and requirements 

' Irganists' salaries, 2. 1 year 

Incc ■•■ 

Mills si leets 

Oil, lOgalls 

o sanctuary lamp 

■ raery 

pencils, 3 boxes 

magazines .... 

Tapers, loOlbs 

Wine altar, 3 galls 

Fre.L -ess 

Boxes, cans, Ac 



Office Expenses. 



Printing and stationery . . . 
Premium onofficei 

- 
- 



•5 cts. Office Expenses — Concluded 

5 BS Strap 

69 30 Telephone 

13 Telephone connections 

Telegrams 

Freight and express 



S cts. 



3,S00 64 
13 50 



3,787*14 



Farm. 

Axletrees, 1 set 

6 00 Axle caps, brass, 4 

32 66 Axle boxes, 2 

1 64 Bran, 4 tons 

2 16 Bottom roller, 1 

40 00 Band fronts, 6 

3 70 Buckles 

4H Chloride of lime, 753 lbs 

14 82 Curry combs, 1 doz 

1 7 40 Cloth, wool, green, 15 yds 

1 75 Flower pots. 224 

6 44 Echolottes, 59 IBs 

34 00 Ferrules. 1 doz 

s )v Forks, hav. 2 doz 

40 00 Fork handles. 2 doz 

12 00 Felt, blue, 22J vds 

8 40 Horses, 4 

Horseshoes, 4 kegs 

250 00 Horseshoes, 125 lbs 

2 52 Harness. 1 set 

22 70 Horseshoe nails, 75 lbs 

2 1 6 Hoes, i doz 

36 00 Knotter, 1 

52 Leather, harness, 162 lbs 

1 16 44 Leather, harness, 78 ft 

167 66 Potato digger, 1 

, i ii I Parts of machinery 

14 63 Veterinary services 

106 76 Paris green, 100 lbs 

Pease, seed, 40 bush 

Potatoes, 2S0f bags 

Linseed meal, 50 lbs 

< >at-.530Jbags 

Steel toe caulk, 19 lbs 

Spokes, 2 sets 

Seeds 

Soap, English, soft, 15 lbs 

Soap, harness, 2 tins 

Sponges, 13* lbs 

1.052 06 Snaffles, * doz 

Saddle, 1 

Shaft chimes, 

Shears, 2 prs 

Rims, 6 sets 

Rosettes, bra — , 6 prs 

Tar, pine, 1 gall 

Turf edger, 1 

Wheels. 1 set 

Wire 243 lbs 

Wheat screenings, 80 tons . . 

Postage 

oners 

Repairs 

Express and freight 



Refund of expenditure 



24 


38 


t 


20 


o 


75 





. 5 


5 


00 


11 


68 


4 


■^ 


21 


24 



72 


93 


56 


21 


100 


00 


6 


40 


1 


71 


11 


50 


50 


00 


S 


65 





33 


9 


70 


45 


00 


3 30 


:; I- 


1 


7.". 


370 96 


>7 




618 


H7 


21 


,m 


12 


,iu 


4 


25 



Trade Shops. 

Brick liners, V doz 

Bucket ear-. I'll lbs. 
Blue print paper. 12 rolls 
Blasting powder, 150 lbs. 



li 20 


15 00 


70 60 


2n 74 


12 43 


864 88 


17 00 


3 00 


4 50 


79 00 


1 00 


1 50 


7.5 


22 59 


1 90 


4.5 on 


19 48 


: fl 


o 7.5 


4 6S 


3 37 


9 56 


850 00 


14 90 


S 41 


55 00 


6 46 


2 mi 


3 So 


45 36 


14 04 




46 13 


41 00 


15 00 


56 mi 


185 66 


1 .50 


556 61 


o -.,, 


.5 or. 


44 30 


1 20 




12 03 


1 20 


r,o oo 


7 10 


2 mi 


17 70 


1 so 


li 7.5 


60 


17 no 


10 


S00 00 


12 








3,229 91 


20 no 


3,209 91 


l 50 




s 28 


12 SO 



EXPENDITURE 



155 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



St. Vincent de Paul — Continued. 



Trade Shops — Concluded 

Brushes, 7\ doz 

Bolt dies, 1 set 

Charcoal. 46 bags 

Chair screw, 1 

Callipers, 1 

Calliper square, 1 

Chalk, red, 10 lbs 

[ Chalk, red. 5 boxes 

Castings, special 

Castings. 14,922 lbs 

CUpper, B. & S 

Cocks, boiler, 1 

Catch, 1 

Combs, graining, 1 set 

Compass, 1 ". 

Compasses. 2 pair 

Chisels, 9 

Coal, smith's. 62.1610 tons.. . 

Crucibles. 6 

Copper, tinned, 29 lbs 

Connectors, lineman's, 1 pair. 

Bits stock. 1 

Bolts. 2.374 

Bristles, 1 lb 

Bits. 49 

Drawing instruments. 1 set. . 

Drill chuck, 1 

Drills, 156 

Derrick booms, 990 ft 

Emery cloth, 1 ream 

Emery strops. 2 doz 

Emery wheels, 5 

Fuse, "5011 ft 

29 doz 

en rakes. 1 doz 

Grindstones, 1 

Gauges, 7 

Gouges, 4 

racks, 1 

ine, 5 galls 

Hammers, 15 lbs 

Hammers. 19 

Handles, hickory, 29 doz. . . . 

Knives. F.W.C., 2 doz 

Knives, shoe. 1 \ doz 

Key. spring divider, 6 in., 1.. 

12 prs 

Levers, cell door, 23 

Locks and keys. 14 

Leather, binding. 3 skins. . . . 

Labour, burning brick 

Lumber, 1 ,064 ft 

Iron, 15,263 lbs 

Iron, cutting of 

Mitre box, 1 

Monkey wrench, 5 

Mud post covers, 6 

Millboard. 25 sheets 

Moulding sand, 2 bags 

Mason's level, 4 

Mason's trowels, 6 

Nails, 4 kegs 

Nippers, 1 set 

Needles, 610 

lies, 231 papers 

Nail sets, 12 

Nuts, 400 lbs 

i lil -tone. 1 

Pad iron, for keyhole, 1 

Plumbers pot and fittings, 2. 

Pattern paper, 2 rolls 

Polishing wheels, 2 

of machinery 

Plane rap-. 2 



8 cts. 



37 90 


3 50 


9 20 


(1 25 


85 


5 74 


2 00 


1 60 


2 50 


921 40 


3 00 


98 


10 


1 00 


4 00 


90 


4 ss 


3S9 01 


7 94 


8 10 


2 40 


1 75 


110 25 


13 00 


11 13 


2 00 


7 06 


162 73 


59 4(1 


14 N2 


3 50 


34 64 


3 00 


62 06 


5 02 


59 


2 61 


1 31 


2 50 


1 35 




19 3S 


16 60 


2 80 


2 97 


1 ,5 


4 80 


19 60 


69 89 


6 75 


25 1 5 


106 40 


266 50 


8 68 


3 50 


s 15 


3 00 


1 68 


1 50 


2 87 


2 55 


10 10 


1 40 


9 40 


6 11 


1 20 


16 63 


50 


25 


6 35 


7 07 


14 50 


93 05 


26 



Trade Shops — Concluded. 

Plane irons, 6 

Planes. 4 

Pencils, carpenter's, 1 doz 

Printing 

Plyers, 5 pairs 

Paint. 30 lbs 

Rice root. 100 lbs 

Rivets. 1,164 lbs 

1 ,2 doz 

Rules, 27 

Rubber hose, 25 ft 

Saws, 3 

Sockets, 6 

Screw drivers, 2 

Spokeshaves, 2 

Scoops and shovels, 7 doz 

Sledges, 2S lbs 

Subscription to magazine Tailor 

Sand paper, 4A reams 

Steel, caulk, 36 lbs 

Steel, sheet. 175 lbs 

Steel, sleeves, 3 

Sash tools. 1 doz 

Sewing cotton, 1 gross 

I ioz 

Screws, log. 50 

Springs, lock, brass, 12 ft 

Taps, 4 

Torch, 1 

Tee square, 1 

Tape line. 1 

Tin. 143 lbs 

Turpentine, 45£ galls 

Tliimbles, \ gross 

Repairs to machines 

Varnish, rubbing, 5 gals 

W.C. bowls, 1 

Wrench, 1 

Washita stones, 1 

Washita strips, 1 doz 

Yellow ochre. 10 lbs 

Postage 

Express and freight 



Less — Refund of expenditure 



Furnishings. 

Blankets, 50 

Forfar linen, 462 yards 
Ticking, 540J yards . . . 

Oilcloth. 4 yards 

Soap, shaving, 1 box . . 

Soap, toilet, 24 doz. . . . 

castile, 1.077 lbs. 

Baling, iv< 

Freight and express. . . . 



Utensils and Vehicles. 

Atomizer. 1 

Ammunition. 1.500 rounds.. . 

Bathbrieks, 2 doz 

Basket, 1 

lii us, 26 doz 

Iter, 1 

( leaver, butcher's, 1 

Clippers, 2 pairs 

634 yards 





8 cts. 


1 41 


6 35 


1 20 


3 20 


3 39 


8 05 


16 00 


52 46 


11 05 


9 97 


2 50 


4 87 


22 20 


45 


55 


45 76 


2 38 


10 00 


9 29 


94 


4 11 


9 00 


97 


21 85 


5 88 


1 22 


1 00 


2 74 


3 25 


1 90 


1 70 


11 56 


36 74 


31 


4! 


8 7.". 


4 70 


3S 


44 


1 95 


30 


71 


7^ 71 


3.135 SI 


1 75 


3,134 06 


112 50 


92 40 


99 95 


1 60 


3 60 


3 60 


78 08 


1 25 


3 30 


396 28 


60 


35 33 


1 00 


42 


8 44 


:,7 26 


20 




6 00 


82 42 


v 17 



156 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



St. Vincent de Paul — Continued. 



Utensils and Vehicles — Continued. 



Dishes. 3 doz. pes 

Feather duster, 2 

Fly paper, 3 boxes 

Globes, outer, 2 

Globes, alabaster, 1 

I Irate, stove. 1 

Knives. 2 

Lawn mower. 1. . 

Lamps, portable, 2 

Lye, _'4 doz 

Mirror, small, 1 

Plates, clipper. 1 

Pearline, 12 boxes 

Pot, 3 galls., 1 

Rings, 2 

Rugs, 2 

Scales, erection of 

Shaving mugs, 7 

Spoons, 1 gross 

Steam soup kettles. 4 . . . 
Scissors, barber's, 1 pair. . 

Springs, 1 doz 

Soap, toilet, 24 doz 

Sifter, flour, 1 

Rock elm, 1.1)22 ft 

Telephone, 1 

Telephone and battery, 1 . 

Typewriter, 1 

Towels. 4 doz 

Whisks, 2 doz 

Whip, 1 

Washboards, 2 

Zincs, battery, 60 

Postage 

Boxes. &e 

Freight and express 



S cts. 



3 

6 
7 
10 SO 

10 

1 25 
44 89 

1 70 

6 00 

7 00 
16 28 

90 

4 25 

675 00 

5S 

1 50 
3 60 
15 

40 sv 
16 00 
13 90 
91 00 
3 74 

2 40 
2 00 
40 
2 40 
IS 
SO 

23 39 



Lands, Buildings and Walls. 

Bends, 10 lengths 

Closets, 6 

Drain pipes, 65 lengths 

Ferrules, trap screw, 1 

Fittings, C.I.. 379 lbs 

Junctions, S.B.. 4 

Lumber, 146,095 ft 

Lavatories, 2 

Pipe, cast iron, 11.472 tons. . . 

Rent of railway siding 

T. Y., 1 ' 

Valve, gate, 1 

Boxes 

Freight 



1,200 97 



Advertising and Travel. 

Advertising 

Escapes 

Travelling expenses 



Less — Refund of expenditure 



Special. 

Prizes for rifle and revolver com- 
petition 



.? cts. 

3 25 
10S 00 

29 25 
79 

10 42 
3 30 

4.114 73 

30 00 
359 55 

11 54 
1 
5 
1 
5 



52 
50 
25 

49 



4.r,s4 .V.i 



L82 69 

S2 50 
720 93 

9S6 12 
107 45 



S7S 67 



50 on 



Total 104,014 37 



E-\rE\nrn re 



157 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



St. Vincent de Paul — Continued. 

RECALATIPITUON. 



Sta ff—, 

Salaries and retiring allowances 

Uniforms and mess 

Maintenance 0/ Convicts — 

Rations 

Clothing and medicines 

Freedom suits and allowances 

Transfer and interment 

Working Expenses — 

Heat, light and water 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery 

Chapels, schools and library 

Office expenses 

Industries — 

Farm 

Trade shops 

Pn "it Equipment — 

Furnishing 

Utensils and vehicles 

Land, buildings and walls 

Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel 

Special 



$ cts. 



55,257 86 
3,580 69 



10,231 20 
4,126 39 



1,895 51 
162 30 



9,130 90 

4,839 20 

370 96 

S64 SS 



3,209 
3.134 


91 
06 


396 

1,200 
4,684 


28 
97 
59 


878 
50 


67 
00 



58,838 55 



14,357 59 



2,057 81 



15,205 94 



0,343 97 



6,281 M 



928 67 



104.014 37 



158 



DEPAUTMEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Dorchester. 



Salaries and Retiring Allowances. 
Salaries. 



$ cts. 



I'n iforms — Concluded. 



Warden. 1 year 2,000 00 

Deput v warden, 1 rear 1 ,500 00 

Chaplain, Protestant, 1 vear S00 00 

Chaplain. Ptoman CathoVic, 1 year . 6iin mi 

Surgeon. 1 year 1,400 00 

Accountant, 1 vear 1,200 00 

Steward, 1 year s 

Engineer, 1 year 900 00 

Hospital overseer, &c, 1 year 800 00 

Matron, 1 vear 5m > I in 

Deputy matron. 1 year 

senger, 1 year 500 00 

Fireman. i%\ months L97 89 

Trade instructors, 8, l yearat $700 . 5.600 00 

Chief keeper. 1 year 800 00 

Keepers, 5, 1 vear at $600 3,000 00 

Guards. 21, 1 year at $500 10,500 00 

Guards, broken periods '■'<■ ^ 95 



Retiring Allowance. 
Rev. ,T. Roy Campbell, D.D. 



rrms. 

Braid, 15 yds 

Braid, 34 gross 

Balmoral uppers, 46 prs. . . . 

Balmorals, 4(1 prs 

Buckles, 6 gross 

Buttons, gilt, 3 gross 

Badges, cap 

oade, 285j yds 

Cotton, 132 yds 

Persian lamb, 4 

Caps, seal, 6 

Calf skins, 514 lbs 

Cloth, 4} yds. 

Cap peaks, 3 j doz 

Cap straps, 3$ doz 

Cam 

Crowns, 16 

Duck, 1004 vds 

Frieze 132} yds 

Fanners' satin. 163 yds. . . . 

i ilcv es, 15 prs 

Holland, 137 vds 

Hats, felt, 72\ doz 

Hooks and eyes, 4 gross . . . 
Italian cloth, 108J yds 

Lining, 121 yds 

"b skins (Persian), s. . 

Leal her, well 2 sides 

Leather, sole, 263 lbs 

Ladies 'uppers, 2 prs 

Mitts, 2 I prs 

ts, 3 doz 

Postage 

Parian 

Pockc- Is 

2 

Spools, 4 

11 yds 

Shoe i oread, 21 lbs 

Silesia, 122 yds 

15 yds 

yds 

Satin. 7 '. vd- . . 



Silk thread, 2 lbs 



31,872 si 



1,283 31 



5 


40 


51 


15 


56 


50 


56 


25 


1 


35 


8 


70 


14 


mi 


51 


44 


14 


19 


50 


50 


12 


90 


38 


63 


13 


si 


9 


38 


1 


511 


14 


50 


19 


nn 


Is 


09 


186 


51 


15 


nn 


20 


2(1 


20 


59 


129 


, .» 


n 


7n 


Is 


71 


17 


•17 


60 


nn 


8 


nn 


68 


38 


l 


00 


29 


80 


3 


nn 





is 


2 


i:, 


3 


30 


25 


nn 





2 1 


6 


60 


15 


, .» 


63 


86 


661 


38 


12 


,-,n 


1 


ss 


5 


62 


6 


50 



Tweed. 31 A yds. . 
Venetian, llyds . 



Officers' ifess 

Apples, dried, 150 lbs . . . 

Baking soda. 10 lbs 

Butter, 616 lbs 

Coffee, 30 lbs 

Eggs, 15 doz 

Ginger, 5 lbs 

Mustard, 10 lbs 

Nutmegs. 4; lb 

• 

Sugar. 1 ,201 lbs 

us, 128 lbs 



Rations. 



Beef. 30,9964 lbs 

Beans. 5.562 lbs 

Barley, l,56Slbs 

Christmas extras 

Corn meal, 476 lbs 

Flour. 770 brls 

Freight and express 

Fish, boneless, cod, 4,635 lbs. 

Fish, herring, 25 brls 

Lard, 400 lbs 

Molasses, 2,097 galls 

Mutton, 1.046 lbs 

Onions, 4S2 lbs 

Pepper, 170 lbs 

Pease, split, 2,548 lbs 

Potatoes. 307 bush 

Rice, 24S lbs 

Rolled oats, 14.4S0 lbs 

Salt, I0,5041bs 

Sugar, 1,242 lbs 

Spice, 5 lbs 

Tea. 511) lbs 

Vinegar, 124 galls 

Feast, 303 lbs 



Clothing. 

( uti.in. grey, 167 fyds 

Cotton, twilled. 123 yds 

( lotl onade, 57 I yds 

Canvas. 150 yds 

I lillilll. 196 vds 

Duck, 554. yds 

Freight and express 

Galatea, 762; yds 

HatS, straw, 23} doz 

i, ole, 2,846} lbs 

iper, 513 lbs 

Moccasins, ljf doz 

Nails, asstd., Inn lb- 

i HI. neatsfoot, 5 galls 

Prison uniform cloth, 1,722} yds . .. 

Packing cases 

kins, 99 lbs 

Toe lacks. 60 lbs 

ing, suits, 100 dot 

■\ arn. 318} lbs 



— Refunds 



$ cts. 



23 63 
5 25 



1.914 44 



11 



50 

00 

117 06 

s Hi 

2 75 

1 50 

2 20 
50 
40 

54 19 
10 24 



213 74 



1,851 95 

39 2n 

48 71 

Is g] 

3,165 40 

50 50 
1S3 30 
112 50 

35 00 
64 1 25 

62 76 
18 00 

36 20 
72 54 

122 si i 

15 24 

414 03 

81 06 

51 2S 
1 00 

94 35 

31 00 

106 05 



7,471 26 



39 si i 

13 22 

10 40 

11 25 
50 96 

s 33 

1 1 si 
UI2 93 

659 35 

169 29 

2 1 93 
39 00 

4 50 

67" :;:: 

7 95 

29 70 

(i 00 

57(1 75 

ins 21 



2,879 21 

,;i 36 



2,844 35 



EXPEXDITURE 



159 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Dorchester — Continued. 



rine and Hospital Comfort? 

Drugs, &c 

Professional services 

Trusses, 2 



Freedom Suits. 

Braid, H yds 

Buttons." 26 gross 

Braces, 9 doz 

Caps, 2^ doz 

Cotton, 4s yds 

Canvas, 100 j'ds 

Dress goods, 19 yds 

Farmers' satin. 100 vds 

Flannel, 62 yds 

Gloves, 3 prs 

Handkerchiefs,42* doz .... 

Hats, women's, 3, 

Hats, men's, 4 doz 

Hooks and eyes, 1 doz 

Jackets, women's. 3 

Lining, 7 yds 

Neckties. 9 doz 

Packing cases 

Shirts, cotton, 6 doz 

Silesia, 116 vds 

Studs. 10 doz 

Skirt binding. 13 yds 

Tweed, 649* yds . 

Trimmings, sundry 

Undervests, 1 

Underclothing, 11 J doz. suits 



Allowances. 

Allowances (including railway fare) 
to 103 convicts 

Transfers, 

Transfer of convicts to other peni- 
tentiaries 



Heat, Light and Water 

Coal, 1 ,290„ij' r ;;, tons 

Coal oil, 2,859$ galk 

Containers 

Matches, 40 gross 



Mainti nance of Buildings 

Actinolite ore, 4 bags 

Asbestos, 28* sheets 

Asbestos wicking, 5 lbs 

Borax. 20 lbs 

Bends. 2 

"iOO 

Bronze, 1 lb 

Babbit metal, .50 lbs 

Bustlings, 1 doz 

lavatory. &c 

Compressed cock seats, 8 doz. 

Chloride of lime. 100 lbs 

Carbonized coating, 5 galls. . 

Coal tar, 8 brls. . 

Carboliriium. 438} galls 

Castings, sundry 

Couplings, 2 doz 

Cocks, compressed, 6 



124 98 



S cts. Maintenance of Buildings — Con. 



Disk valves, 3 doz 

Electric bells, and connection- 2 

Electric wire. 300 ft 

Elbows. 63 

Excelsior, 50 lbs 

Fire pots, 2 

Freight and express 

Flue lining. 400 ft 

Flanges. 6 

and spindle, 1 

Flooring, maple, 200 ft 

Furnaces, combination. 1 

Fire brick. 300 

Fireclay, 44s lbs 

Globe valves. 10 

(irate-, stove, 1 

Garden hose. 25 ft 

Glass, 2 cases 

Iron bushings. 13 

Iron, round, 4,075 lbs 

Iron, galvanized. 1,764 lbs 

Japau, 5 galls 

Hard oil finish. 2 galls 

Hinges. T, 10 doz 

Hose fittings, sundry 

Heating pipes. &c, extended to 

deputy wardens' quarters 

Leather, sole. 1 side 

Lumber, 2.060 ft 

Lime, 75 casks 

Metallic roofing, 9 squares 

Nails, board. 20 kegs 

Nails, boot. 2.5 lbs 

Oil, linseed, 87 galls 

Oil filters. 1 

Postage 

Pipe, lead. 330* lbs 

Pipe, fittings, sundry 

Plasterers' hair, 13* bushels 

Pig tin, 26i lbs.. . .". 

Putz polish. 2 doz 

Pipe, wrought iron, 61f ft 

Pipe, wrought iron, 764; lbs 

Pipe, galvanized iron, 63S ft 

Packing cases 

Padlocks. Yale, § doz 

Padlocks, ordinary, 1 doz 

Polish. 120 lbs. . .' 

Rough stops, i doz 

Red lead. 2.5 lbs 

Resin. 50 lbs 

Red paint. 2.5 lbs 

Rope. 250 ft 

Steel balls, 30 

Soap, laundrv. 1 .200 lbs 

Soap, chip, 881 lbs 

Steel cable. 4.50 ft 

Shellac. 2 galls 

Slate roofing, 2SI square- 

Sand, 60 loads 

Steam hose, 75 ft 

Steam gauge, 1 

Tecs, 21 . 

Tarred paper, 25 rolls 

Tank cocks, 1 

Stockholm, 1 gall 

Travelling penitentiary 

architect 

Toilet i 



Valve seats. 7 

Wire. 17.5 11'- 

Wire. <;ale iron, 300 ft 

lead 825 lbs 



194 


75 


15 


00 


1 


08 


210 83 





22 


23 


25 


9 


90 


o 


10 


4 


96 


t 


2.5 


4 


i 5 


9 


75 


7 


44 





75 


30 


06 


3 


66 


28 


50 





03 


9 


50 


1 


17 


9 


90 


1 


00 


24 


00 


17 


40 





80 


1 


50 


219 


43 


2 


20 





30 


39 38 


462 


20 


1 .234 


2.5 



3,313 


34 


578 


98 





i 5 


16 


80 


3,909 


87 


2 


60 


2 


28 


2 


0(1 


1 


40 


1 


60 


2 


36 


1 


7.5 


5 


IHI 


30 


72 


80 



1 32 
4 50 
7 80 

28 00 
438 50 

47 52 
1 .56 



5 cts. 

: _ 

7 49 

II vs 

134 68 
9 50 

3 35 

V 88 

1 13 

s7 st 
66 10 

7 50 
5 
12 14 

90 

.51 10 



ll 


,'.< 


104 


25 


24 


in 


do 


lit 


1 


. ■.) 


43 


23 


1.5 


on 





04 


15 




1 


- 


5 


4o 


S 


in 





81 


10 


71 


3 


70 


34 


oo 


2 




10 


25 


3 


25 


20 


10 


o 


.in 


1 




1 


51 


1 


50 


11 


.».> 




43 


Si 


44 




29 


05 


5 


? 


19 


67 


12 




22 


x^ 


. 


20 


9 


7^ 






o 







4.5 




37 


80 


7 




2 




4 


82 




45 


32 



160 



DEPARTMKM OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



Dorchester — Continued. 



Maintenance of Buildings — Con. 

Wooden pulleys, 4 

Washing soda" 2,240 lbs 

Whiting, 504 lbs 

Water glasses, 2 doz 

Waste, cotton, 119 lbs 

Less — Refunds 



Maintenance of Machinery. 

Boiler inspection 

Boiler tubes, 12 

Boiler fittings 

Cotton waste, 223 lbs 

Check valves, 1 

Containers 

Cog wheels and fittings. 2 

Oil, sperm, 5 galls 

Packing, 7J lbs 

Plugs. 1 doz 

Reducing valves, 2 

Tube expanders, 1 

Tube cleaners, 2 



•els, School and Library 

Altar wine, 4 galls 

Altar requisites 

Catechisms, 3 doz 

Organists' salaries 

Subscriptions, sundry papers . 

Stationery 

School books 

Bible, 1 



Office Expenses. 

Books, sundry 

Freight and express 

Mucilage, 1 quart 

Premium on officers' bonds 

Postage 

Repairs to office safe 

Printing, sundry forms, &c 

- ' lonery 

Telegrams 

Telephone 



Farm. 

Actinolite, tinct. of, J lb. 

Mum, -'ii lbs 

2 

'i-se, 1 doz. . . 
Brushes, dandy, 1 doz. . 
Binder twine. 400 lbs. . 

7 

167 ft 

i Hastings 

Tiers 

ctants, 17 galls. . 

i and express 

in II.- 

.171 lbs 
1 li.rsr covers, l 

i I :.' II- - . 1 -'I 

Hay. I I '..ii- 



Harrows, 1 



S cts. 


4 45 


22 40 


5 04 


3 20 


S 33 


2,060 49 


G2 73 


1,997 76 


40 00 


21 60 


7 no 


20 09 


2 17 


50 


22 50 


6 25 


4 05 


36 


i:,7 :m 


in 80 


2 75 


296 17 


12 00 


14 00 


1 95 


100 00 


28 .Mi 


40 47 


3 60 


45 


200 97 


6 54 


32 05 


1 00 


24 00 


84 82 


65 00 


117 10 


03 40 


44 35 


94 30 


532 65 


ii 28 


1 nil 


12 20 


I i:; 


:; ss 


12 Mil 


in mi 


11 69 


7 on 


2 35 


54 ii.". 


1 07 


:. .".ii 


6 17 


2 15 


30 00 


'.i7 69 


I 58 


js mi 



Farm — Concluded. 

Hoes, 1 doz 

Hay and straw, mixed, 2ijja tons 

Manure forks 

Maehinerv, sundry parts 

Oats. 1.000 bush 

Paris green. 50 lbs 

Potash, nitrate of, 2 lbs 

Plough points. 27 

Rubber squares, 2 

Rollers, 2 sets 

Rakes, hay, 1 doz 

Rope, 4 lbs 

Straw. 13.070 lbs 

Seeds, sundry 

Sulphur. 224 lbs 

Trucks, 1 

Whips, 1 

Wire fencing 



Slwps. 

Axe handles. 1 doz 

Auger bits. 3 setts 

Brush screws, 2 

Brushes, paint, 1 doz 

Brushes, varnish, -£ doz 
Brushes, camel's hair, i doz 
Brushes, Dandy, 2 doz . . . . 
Brushes, kalsomine, 3 doz . 

Blocks. 10 

Braces and bits, 3 

Charcoal, 110 lbs 

(.'oil caps, 1 

Chisels, 3 sets 

Carriage bolts. 200 

Chalk, 25 lbs 

Chain tongs, 1 pr 

Drills. 2J doz 

1 lusters, painter's -J doz . . . 

Emery cloth. 20 quires 

Eyelets, 25 boxes 

Freight 

Files. S doz 

Fuse, 6 coils 

Gasoline, 10 galls 

Gouges, 2 doz 

Horse nails, 6 boxes 

Hatchets, 1 doz 

Harness needles, 1 doz . . . . 
Harness buckles, 46 doz.. . . 

Harness snaps. 11 doz 

Heel and t."' plates, 23 prs . 

I lorn protector. 1 

Heel ioz 

I lard oil finish. 5 galls 

Ink. burnishing, 48 bottles . 
Iron, galvanized, 572 lbs. . . 

Iron, sheel . 125 lbs 

Iron, bar, i 030 lbe 

lion, Ii....]., 209 His 

1 " .ii. Russian. 10S lbs 

Knife sharpeners, 1 doz . . . 
Kctth- eai ... 
I. cat i 102 lbs 
heather. s,,ie. 259} lbs 

Leather, well . I sides 

I eather, harness, 209 lbs . . 
Lasts, 23 prs 

Level ehi-scs .6 

Lasting tacks. 6 gross 

Ma-oil-' hue-. J.to.' 

Manilla paper, 2 reams 

Machine silk, 2 do/. 



4 40 
17 06 

9 6S 

39 10 

535 00 

8 J-". 

24 
10 51 

5 00 
2 50 

1 61 

80 
26 58 

276 09 
8 96 
4 20 

1 00 
180 37 



1,453 S9 



2 40 

IS 00 

1 in 

.-, Ml 

79 

94 

2 S6 
IS 36 
25 63 

2 04 

1 50 

25 
s, >.s 

1 66 

2 nil 
9 00 

12 56 

1 60 

15 50 

3 75 
25 
8 63 



15 



no 
50 

.HI 

60 

5 11 
n .Mi 

2 76 

3 02 
11 50 

ii 20 

6 75 

5 75 

6 nn 
27 17 
20 19 
Ll 57 

11 oil 

1 1 ss 

2 m 

3 51 

:;:i 66 
r.7 17 
16 00 
80 Li 

5 Ho 

33 

1 20 
'.' nn 
-, 90 

6 50 



KXI'ESDITVRE 



161 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Dorchester— Continued. 



Shops — Concluded. 

Oil stones. 3 

Powder, 7 kegs 

Packing cases 

Pig tin, 83$ lbs 

Pipe taps, 1 

Pincers, 1 pr 

Planes. 10 

Rubber bulb. 1 

Rivets. 21 J lbs 

Rules, 1 doz 

.Saws. hand. 

Sawteeth, 30 

Saw blades, 2 doz 

Sand paper, 35 quires 

Sewing cotton, 4 gross 

Snips, 1 pr 

Sash tools, 1 doz 

Subscriptions to magazines, &c 

Steel, 520 lbs 

Sewing silk , 1 lb 

Stove bolts, 200 

Shovels, 1 doz 

Scoops, 1 doz 

Tuyer irons, 3 

Trowels, mason's. 6 

Thread, linen, 25 lbs 

Turn pin, 1 

Toe tacks, 20 lbs 

Thread, spool, 6J gross 

Tin, 4 boxes 

Wrenches, monkey, 2 

Wrenches, pipe, 1 

White board, 1 

Wire fencing tools 

Yellow ochre, 25 lbs 



Machinery. 



Elbow edging machine, 1 . 
Pump and receiver, 1 . . . 



Furnishings. 

Duck, 155 yds 

Forfar linen, 501 yds . . . 

Packing cases 

Soap, shaving, 20 lbs . . . 
Soap, castile, 393 lbs . . . 

Ticking, 207 vds 

Twine, 12 lbs 



Utensils and Vehicle*. 

Ammunition, 3,000 rounds. . 

Axles, 1 set 

Blacking, 2 doz 

Brooms, 21 doz 

Barber's shears, $ doz 

Brushes, whitewash, 1 doz . . , 

Brushes, shoe, 1 doz 

Brushes, scrubbing, 20 doz . . . 

Baskets, 2 

Burners, 10 doz 

Carriage clips, 8 

ocks, repairs to 

Combs, barber's, 2 doz 



5 cts. 

1 27 
17 50 

2 35 
27 50 

1 25 
4 50 

11 21 

30 

2 83 

3 60 

8 32 

9 00 

1 40 
6 71 

17 48 

2 15 

1 15 
10 00 
50 75 

6 50 

2 10 
6 30 

10 50 
6 75 
2 3S 

53 75 

20 
2 00 

28 41 

20 00 

2 20 

1 80 

2 88 
10 60 

75 



845 


60 


39 


50 


157 


50 


197 


00 


46 


50 


100 


20 





75 


8 


00 


37 


34 


38 


30 


4 


80 


235 


89 



:,'( 7.3 
2 75 

2 20 
46 20 

3 75 

2 40 
1 94 

10 33 

I 20 
6 50 

II Ml 
6 00 

3 00 



Ustensils and Vehicles — Concluded. 

Clothes pins, 5 boxes 

Carriage springs, 1 set 

Clock dials, 1,000 

Clippers, 2 prs 

Cartridges, 3,000 

Dusters, 3 

Freight 

Fly paper, 3 boxes 

Generators, 1 box 

Hair clippers, parts of 

Hair clippers, sharpening 

Kettles, 4 

Knives, butcher. 3 

Lanterns, detective 

Lanterns, C.B., 1 doz 

Lantern globes, 2 doz 

Lamps, 1 

Lamp chimneys, 51 doz 

Lamp wicks, 1 doz 

Lamp fonts, 4 doz 

Meat dishes, tin, 300 

Putz polish, 2 doz 

Packing cases 

Range fittings 

Rifles, sundry parts of 

Shovels, snow, 2 doz 

Shovels, iron, 4 doz 

Shafts, 1 pr 

Saucers, 2 doz 

Spoons, table, 10 doz 

Stove, cook, 1 

Thermometers. 2 

Towelling, 304 yds 



Land. Buildings and Walls. 



Cement, 30 brls 

Iron, flat, 7,855 lbs 

Iron, Russian. 112 lbs 

Lime, 200 casks 

Land, 6^ acres 

Lumber^ 25,77S ft 

Legal services 

Pipe, 2,S58J ft 

Steel beams, girders. &c 

Travelling expenses (penitentiary 
architect) 



Advertising and Travel. 

Advertising 

Travel, departmental officers 
Travel, penitentiary officers 

Less — Refunds 



Special. 

Prizes for rifle and revolver COl 
tion 

Rewards fm- capturing escaped con- 
victs 



$ cts. 

4 50 

4 50 

5 50 

6 12 
63 60 

1 75 
1 S9 
1 50 
10 00 
1 92 

1 91 

3 40 

2 20 
16 50 

7 25 
1 30 

4 50 
32 50 

1 20 

6 00 

13 50 

80 

50 
21 70 

6 17 
10 99 
27 60 

1 00 
-ii 

2 00 
25 64 

30 
29 38 



477 24 



75 00" 
152 09 

12 32 
250 25 

65 00 

534 72 

6 00 

.87 19 

;ss ,„, 

10 SO 



1,581 


37 


121 
60 
73 


20 
00 
06 


254 
11 


26 
52 


242 


74 



50 00 
40 00 



90 00 



Total 



59,693 35 



34—11 



162 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



Dorchester — Continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 



Staff— 

Salaries and retiring'allowances 
Uniforms and mess 



Maintenance of Convicts — 

Rations 

Clothing and medicines . 



Discharge Expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances . 
Transfers and interments 



Working Expenses — 

Heat, light and water 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery . 

Chapels, school and library 

Office expenses 



Industries — 

Farm 

Trade shops 

Prison Equipment — 

Machinery 

Furnishings 

Utensils and vehicles 

Land, buildings and walls . 



Miscellaneous — 

Advertising and travel. 
Special 



S cts. 
33.156 15 



2,128 


IS 


7,471 
3,055 


26 
18 


1,696 
124 


45 
98 



:;.'.io<,i s: 

2,293 93 

200 97 

532 65 



1,453 89 

845 60 



197 00 
235 89 

477 24 
1.5S1 37 



242 74 
90 00 



$ cts. 



35.2S4 33 



10.526 44 



1,821 43 



6.937 42 



2,299 49 



2,491 50 



332 74 
59,693 35 



EXPEXDITVRE 



163 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



MANITOBA. 



Salaries and Retiring Gratuities — 
Salaries. 

Warden, 1 year 

Deputy warden. 1 year 

Surgeon, 1 year 

Chaplain, Protestant, 1 year 

Chaplain, Roman Catholic, 11 § nios 

Accountant, 1 year 

Storekeeper, 9 months 

Steward, 1 year 

Hospital overseer, &c, 1 year 

Engineer, 1 year 

Chief trade instructor, 9 months. . . . 

Trade instructors, 2, 1 year 

Trade instructors, broken periods . . 

Keeper, 10 months 

Guards, 11,1 year 

Guards, broken periods 

Gratuities. 



W.Eddies, guard. 



Uniforms. 

Braid, common, 2 gross . 

Braid, gold, 36 yds 

Braid, military, 6} gross . 
Braid, tracing. 1 J- gross . . 

Buttons, 4 gross 

Badges, 2 

Caps, seal, 18 

Caps, Persian lamb, 6. . . . 

Coat, coon. 1 

Calf, Canadian, 37 lbs . . . 
Calf. French, 135*. lbs . . . 

Cordovan. 226} lbs 

Canvas, 250 yds 

Crowns, brass, 6 doz .... 

Crowns, gilt, 4f doz 

Duck, 681 yds 

Elastic, gaiter, 10 yds . . . 
Farmer's satin. 229} vds. 

Felt, 30 yds 

Frieze, 934, yds 

Freight and express 

Hats, 2 doz 

Haircloth, 100 vds 

Holland, 150 yds 

Hard ash, 1 lb 

Hooks and eyes, 2 gross . 
Kangaroo skins, Ho\ ft . . 

Lining, 509} vds 

Military cloth, 8 yds 

Machine silk, 4 lbs 

Patrol jacket, 1 

Padding, 21 lbs 

Padding, 171} yds 

Porpoise hide, 15} lbs . 

Postage 

Packing cases 

Rubber tissue, 3 lbs 

Stay linen, 245} yds . . 

Serge, 537} yds 

Satin, 419 yds 

Studs, 5,000 

Trousers, 1 pr 

Thread, linen, 2 lbs 

Wadding, 2 bales 



Less -Refunds 



$ cgs 



2.200 00 

1,500 00 

1.500 00 

800 00 

777 70 

1,100 00 

600 00 

800 00 

900 00 

1,000 00 

750 01 

1,400 00 

1,399 96 

500 00 

6,600 00 

6.089 43 



Police Mess. 



27,917 12 



920 42 



7 


.Ml 


4 32 


70 


16 


1 


56 


9 


'.in 


4 


tin 


38 


70 


72 


DM 


80 


00 


28 


VI 


155 


83 


33 


94 


IS 


to 


10 80 


18 


75 


138 


C..S 


6 


00 


33 


64 


36 


00 


139 


^ 


26 


37 


31 


.".I! 


24 


00 


27 


mi 


o 


llll 





in 


16 37 


91 


in 


32 


Ml 


20 


llll 


45 


00 


o 


00 


58 


22 


20 48 





12 





75 


2 


70 


36 


79 


1,183 


05 


35 


62 


4 


.-,n 


12 


50 


4 


.-,ii 


10 


50 


2,603 


17 


10 


i:t 



2,592 74 



Beef .502 lbs 

Biscuits. 3 lbs 

Butter, 521 lbs 

Baking powder, 15 lbs. . . . 

Codfish. S lbs 

Cornstarch. 2.5 lbs 

Canned fruit 

Eggs, 28 doz 

Essences, 5 bottles 

Freight and express 

Herrings, kippered. 3 tins. 

Mustard, 5 tins 

Malta vitae. 1 pekg 

Orange meat, 12 pekgs. . . . 

Oranges, 2 doz 

Sugar, 200 lbs 

Sauces, 2 bottles 

Tomatoes, 9 tins 

Tapioca, 9 lbs 

Tea, S lbs 



Rations. 



Beef. 41,532 lbs 

Beans. 2,962 lbs 

Codfish, 96 lbs 

Christmas extras 

Container 

Fish, 'loneless, 200 lbs . 

Flour, 550 brls 

Freight 

Molasses, 178 galls 
Oatmeal. 2,252 lbs 

Pepper, 55 lbs 

Pease, split, 1,178 lbs . 

Rice, 2,201 lbs 

Sugar, 5,003 lbs 

Salt, 6.000 lbs 

Tea, 740 lbs 

Vinegar. 29 galL« 

Yeast cakes, 147 doz . . 



34— Hi 



Clothing. 

Blueing, 6 lbs 

Buttons, assorted. 21 doz .... 
Buckles, assorted. 9 gross .... 

Brace, elastic, 200 vds 

Cotton, 3,293 J vds". 

Canvas. 246} vds 

Cowhide, 365} lbs 

Duck, US vds 

Drill, 426}'vds 

Duffle cloth, 58} vds 

Denim, 1.201} vds 

Felt, 24 sheets ^ 

Freight and express 

Galatea, 994} yds 

QatS, straw. 12 doz 

Leather, sole, 1 ,940} lbs 

Leather, moccasin, 27S lbs . . . 
Leather, cordovan, 105} lbs 

Lining, 367} yds 

Moose skins, 12 

Prison uniform cloth, 749} yds 

Packing cases 

Shirting, 1,617} yds 

Sheep I ds 

Starch, laundry. 32 lbs 

Soda, washing, 711 lbs 

Tape, 10 bolts 



? cts. 

141 47 

1 20 

117 4!i 
3 90 

,l Ml 

2 92 

I,.-, IIS 

5 S3 

I 7S 
43 

II 45 
75 
15 

95 

1 00 
10 35 

80 

1 44 
II 55 

3 2ii 



360 


54 


2,450 


70 


95 


42 


i 


20 


31 


SO 


2 


25 


15 


00 


2,145 


in, 





50 


90 


30 


67 


56 


12 


10 


35 


34 


87 


30 


241 


ss 


84 


70 


136 


90 


9 


28 


63 


45 


5.576 


68 



1 50 

14 28 
8 70 

45 on 
316 39 

18 50 
126 00 

15 93 
44 76 
67 82 

327 48 

6 00 

21 93 

149 21 

14 70 
I",, si, 

''1 7) 

15 -7 
24 47 

ins im, 
426 18 

s :-, 

Jin M 
s ss 

I 92 

1 1 •->'-' 

II .-,,,1 



164 



DEPARTMEST OF JCHTICE 



5-6 EDWARD Vli., A. 1906 



Manitoba — Co tit in ued. 



Clothing — Concluded . 

Underclothing, 159* doz. suits . 

Wadding. 360 yds 

Yarn, 650 lbs 



S its. 



Medicine and Hospital Comfort 

Apples. 10 lbs 

Biscuits. 3 boxes 

Bovril. 3 bottles' 

Drugs, &c 

Eggs. 1 doz 

Fluid beef, 2 cans 

Fruit, sundry 

Keep of insane prisoner 

Oysters, 1 pint 

Professional services 

Tobacco, 4 lb* 

Trusses, 5 



Freedom Suit*. 

Buttons, coat, 20 gross 

Buttons, collar. 2 gross 

Canadian calf .43* lbs 

Canvas. 150 yds 

* 'ollars, 6 doz 

imitation Persian lamb. 3 doz 

Bxpcess 

Handkerchiefs. 6 doz 

Hate, felt, 3 doz 

Mitts, woollen. 3 doz 

Neckties, 6 doz 

Shirts, cotton. 6 doz 

Tweed, 434J yds 

Underclothing, 4 suits 



Allowance*. 

Allowances (including railway fan- 
to 64 convicts 



Transfers. 

Transfer of convicts i<> other peni- 
tentiaries 



959 


63 


16 


20 


234 


00 


3,826 


26 





50 





50 


2 


25 


233 


98 





15 


1 


00 


1 


50 


243 


05 





40 


33 


20 


3 


15 


13 


08 


532 


76 


7 


50 


1 


20 


33 


30 


11 


25 


6 


00 


13 


50 





30 


2 


70 


14 


25 


9 


00 


7 


50 


24 


00 


124 


84 


6 


00 


261 


34 


1,256 


15 



Heat, Light and Water. 

c.al oil, 3,035] galls 

coal. 510} tons 

( ordwood", 191 cords 

Cleaning well (8J days' lalxmr).. 

Freight 

Lamp wick, 4 gross 

Packing cases 



Maintenana of Buildings and 
Machinery. 

Al uminum leaf, 5 books 

Ajrle pulleys, l doi 

Bolts, 300' 

Bluestone, 5 Lbs 

Batteries, Blue Bell, 12 

Battcrii'-. dry, 12 

Blaoklead, 1 gross 

Borax. 10 lbs. 

Blue, ultra marine, 38 lbs 



2i n 



774 


56 


:;.s:is 


00 


944 


00 


85 


00 


1 


50 


2 


30 





20 


5,645 


56 





60 


II 


95 


3 


7s 








, .i 


l 


SO 


6 


Mil 


1 


'.Ml 


ii 


80 


I 


56 



Maintenance of Buildings and Ma- 
ch i n cry — Concluded . 

Black japan. 5 galls 

Bath brick. 25 

Brackets, 3 

Cap screws, 4 

Candle wick, § lb 

Closet bpwels, 3 

Closet fittings 

Carbolinium, 345A galls 

Colours, assorted, 104 lbs 

Copper, 35J lbs 

Carriage varnish. 1 gall 

Castings, 1.125 lbs 

Drop black. 25 lbs 

Emerv cloth, 22 quires 

Elbows. 9 

Enamel, 5 galls 

Formalin. 3 galls 

Flushing rubbers. 3 

Freight and express 

Fireclay, 5 sacks 

French oil gold size. 1 quart 

Grate heater. 1 

Glue,, 200 lbs 

Glass, 9 cases 

Glazier paints, 15 lbs 

Gold leaf, 1 pkg 

Hexagon nuts, 4 

Hardoil finish, 5 galls 

Ice, 60 tons 

Iron, flat and round, 3.495 lbs. . . . 
Iron, galvanized sheet. 479 lbs. . . 

Iron hoops, 104 lbs 

Japan, 15 galls 

Japan dryer, 5 galls 

Lamp fonts. 2 doz 

Lamp brackets, 2 doz 

Lamp black, 50 lbs 

Lubricators, 2 

Lime, chloride of, 250 tins 

Lye, concentrated. 58 doz. tins. . . 

Locks, yale, 7 

Locks, pad, 9 

Locks, door, 4 

Locks, cupboard. 12 

Lace, leather, 3£ lbs 

Nuts, square, 100 lbs 

Nails, wire. 11 kegs 

Oil, boiled and raw. 85$ galls 

Ochre yellow, 52 lbs 

Paint, '300 lbs 

Putz pomade, 2/^ gross 

Tipe, stove. 200 lengths 

Pipe, iron, 139 ft 

Pipe, flange. 1 

Pulley brackets, 1 

Putty. 98 lbs 

Plaster paris, 2 brls 

Packing cases 

Pump, repairs to 

Reflectors, 2 doz 

Rubber packing, 52 lbs 

Rope, 500 ft 

Red lead, 102 lbs 

Soap, 4.430 lbs 

Sal amoliiac, HI lbs 

Stoves, 6 

Steam pump, repairs to 

Steel. 600 lbs 

Sewing machines, repairs to 

Screws, 17 gross. 

Shingles. 5,000 

Seeds. 

Tallow, 434 lbs 



S cts. 



3 75 
2 00 
2 25 
40 

09 
43 50 

5 50 
345 50 

15 54 
13 49 

4 00 

39 37 
4 50 

20 93 
4 60 

22 50 
2 25 

1 20 
143 15 

'< 72 

2 2.". 

50 

23 00 
55 17 

1 20 

7 75 

10 

8 75 
36 00 

101 16 

23 2S 

7 80 

12 25 

4 25 

2 80 

6 20 

5 00 

6 50 

22 25 
63 SO 
20 44 

3 52 
2 50 

4 05 
2 28 

7 til 
3S 61 
:,l S3 

1 43 
15 64 
10 24 
20 Oil 
29 4ti 

1 75 

1 Oil 

2 50 

8 .-,11 

II Ml, 

134 10 

:; .mi 
10 05 

5 45 

;. 64 

230 05 

2 50 

91 56 

40 (15 
Hi 32 

7H 

8 52 

20 OO 

2 15 

23 v 



EXPEXDITURE 



165 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Manitoba — Continued. 



Maintenance of Buildings and Ma 
eh incry — Concluded. 

Toilet paper, 700 pkgs. 

Telephone, repairs to line 

Turpentine, 41£ galls 

Tube whistles, 1 

Vermillion, 26 lbs 

Varnish, copal, 5 galls 

Venetian red, 64 lbs 

Washing soda, 1,276 lbs 

Washers, 25 lbs 

White lead, 1,500 lbs 

Whiting, 2,020 lbs 

Whiting, 3 brls 

Wire, spark arrester, 2 yds 

Wire, iron, bright, 2 coils 

Zincs, for telephone, 12 

Less — Refunds 



Machinery. 

Boiler inspection 

Foot valves, 1 

Oil, cylinder, li galls. . 
Oil, machine, 47 galls. . 



Chapels, Schools and Libraries. 

Bibles, 1 doz 

Books, school 

Candles, 24 lbs 

Express 

Hymn and prayer books 

Incense, &c 

Organists' salaries 

Organ repairs 

Printing, &c 

Songs and solos 

Sanctuary oil, 10 galls 

Subscriptions to magazines, &c. 

Stationery 

Sundries for chapel 

Wax, 30 lbs 



Office Expenses. 

Directories, 2 

Freight and express 

Premium on officers' bonds 

Postage 

Printing, books, forms, &c 

Stationery, sundries 

Telephone 

Telegrams 

Farm. 

Vxle grease, 4 lbs 

Aermeter fittings, sundry pieces . 
Agricultural implements, sundry 

pieces 

Kinder twine, 300 lbs 

Binding gloves, 1 pair 

Brooms, stable, 1 doz 

Boars, 2 

Bull rings, 1 

Bran, 1 ton 

Cultivators, 1 

Curry coml>, - doz 



S cts. 



45 50 
69 20 
38 60 

27 
6 25 

16 25 

1 76 

24 68 

1 66 
84 75 

25 25 
14 Oil 

2 50 
4 38 
1 20 



2,286 44 
9 40 



2,277 04 



30 00 
1 50 
1 05 

21 21 



.53 76 



3 00 
ID 16 

3 36 

55 
34 40 

5 50 
62 50 

2 00 

3 12 
5 50 

13 00 
58 50 

86 
15 70 

3 83 



JJI 'is 



10 00 

44 17 

24 00 

47 75 

533 11 

244 36 

68 70 

132 20 



1,104 29 



4 19 
6 35 



10 36 


36 


75 


2 


00 


2 


'.17 


23 


llll 





1 I 


Hi 


XII 


13 


nn 


2 


:,n 



Farm — Concluded. 

Coil chain, 27 lbs 

Forks, hay, 2 doz 

Forks, manure, i doz 

Freight and express 

Grinders, 1 

Harness, 1 set 

Harness buckles, 48 doz 

Horseshoes 

Horseshoe pads, 2 

Horse pails, 1 doz 

Horses, 4 

Horses, commission on sale of 

Horseshoe, nails, 25 lbs 

Horse brushes, 1 doz 

Hav knife, 1 

Oats, 150 bush 

Plough, 1 

Plow, gang, 1 

Rakes, garden, 2 

Sulphur flour, 25 lbs 

Sleigh runners, 1 set 

Seed grain, sundry 

Seed, potatoes 

Seeds, sundry 

Shears, garden, 1 pr 

Scythes, 8 

Scythes, snaiths, 8 

Threshing grain, 7,073 bush . 
Veterinary services 



Shops. 

Acid, muriatic, 54, galls . .. . 

Arid, oxalic, 2 lbs 

Awls, 4 gross 

Axes, chopping. 1 doz 

Axes, brush, 4, doz 

Axe handles, 4 doz 

Binding cloth, 40 yds 

Blue print paper, 1 J reams 
Brick machine fittings . . . . 

Brushes, paint, 2 doz 

Brushes, wall, 4 doz 

Brushes, whitewash, 2 doz . 

Brushes, oval, J doz 

Brushes, dandy, 1 doz 

Brushes, lettering, ^ doz . . 
Brushes, varnish, 14 doz . . 
Brushes, kalsomine, 3 doz . 

Buckles, 2 doz 

Bristles, 1 lb 

Beeswax, 2 lbs 

Brush screws, 2 

Coal, smith's, 6 tons 

Cotton. ISO} yds 

Containers 

Charcoal, 24 sacks 

Carpenter's pencils, 2 gross 

Chalk lines. 1 doz 

Cheese cloth, 6 yds 

Chalk, 2} doz. boxes 

Cement block mould 

Cordwood, 216 cords 

Drill machine 

Eyelets, 53 gross 

Emery powder, 1 lb 

Emerv cloth. 1 roam 

Fuse,2,700ft 

Freight and express 

Kelt. 24 lbs 

Files, 1 1 doz 

Gum, 2 lbs 

Glue. 109 lbs 



$ cts. 



1 62 


9 60 


3 00 


40 81 


45 00 


35 50 


7 14 


1 00 


2 00 


8 50 


975 00 


7 85 


2 75 


3 25 


65 


70 00 


17 60 


80 00 


11 40 


1 00 


5 25 


140 90 


37 50 


61 58 


1 00 


.". 42 


;, lis 


179 83 


28 75 


1,907 64 


6 80 


n :;u 


7 95 


9 00 


1 73 


13 00 


7 73 


1 25 


16 00 


2 8S 


24 "..". 


2 90 


1 65 


4 50 


1 52 


6 99 


21 54 


20 


9 00 


70 


1 3(1 


5S III) 


24 :« 


4 30 


1 1 10 


i 80 


1 80 


ii IJ 


3 90 




1,166 to 


1 00 


4 40 


o lo 


17 70 


1 1 75 


11 11 


10 76 


2 nl 


1 50 


i ; 6 ■ 



166 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Manitoba — Continued. 



Shops — Continued. 



Gilders' tips, 3 

Hammers, S doz 

Hammer handles, 2 doz 

Horse rasps, ^ doz 

Iron, galvanized, 81 lbs 

Iron, band, 75 lbs 

Knitting machine, sundry parts . 
Leather cement, 2 doz bottles . . 

Leather, welt, 91 J lbs 

Level glasses, £ doz 

Lasts, 12 prs 

Lumber, 22,890 ft 

Machine silk, 6 lbs 

Mason's hammers, 6 

Mason's lines, 2i doz 

Mottlers, 3 

Needles, tailor's, 2 boxes 

Needles, tailor's, 150 papers .... 

Needles, darning, 12 doz 

Needles, machine, 7 gross 

Nails, 4 kegs 

Nails, channel, 30 lbs 

Oil, machine, 10 galls 

Oil, cylinder, 10 galls 

Oil, sewing machine, 2 galls 

Oil stones, 2 

Oak, 1,128 ft 

Paste. 30 lbs 

Powder, 35 kegs 

Pattern paper, 1 1 1 lbs 

Pattern paper, 6 rolls 

Postage 

Picks, 1 doz 

Packing cases 

Pincers, shoe, 1 doz 

Putty knives. 3 

Plane irons, 1} doz 

Painter's dusters, 3 

Pick handles, 2 doz 

Pipe cutters, 1 

Rubber straps, 2 doz 

Rubber cement, A doz 

Rules, 1 doz 

Rope, 80} lbs 

Shank drills, 1 

Scoops. 6 

Saws, rip, 6 

Saws, hand, 6 

Saws, panel, 2 

Sacks, 80 

Sash tools. 4 doz 

Spools, 10 gross 

Steel shanks, 12 doz 

Shank luster. 1 

Shoe nails, 15 lbs 

Shoe knives 

Steel, 105 lbs 

Shoe rasps, 4 doz 

Studs, ^ gross 

Shoe dressing, 2 doz 

Shoe thread, 21 lbs 

Shoe ink, 1 doz 

Sand paper, 26 quires. 

Sad irons. 2 sets 

Sledge handles, ti doz 

Stay binding, 2 gross 

Steel jaws, f. pra 

Screws, 12 gross 

Shovels, 3 doz 

Toe tacks, 36 lbs 

Trowels, 2 doz 

Twist, 3 lbs 

Tin, 2 boxes 

i tumbles, 3doi 



$ cts. 

25 

16 50 

3 20 
7 50 

4 86 

2 10 
15 10 

3 00 
39 45 

30 

5 40 
632 25 

43 50 

6 51 
3 55 

1 12 

2 50 

3 75 
48 

13 00 

17 40 
6 00 



4 
7 
2 
1 
85 
4 
101 



o oo 

12 00 
14 
5 40 
85 
5 50 

44 
5 64 

1 25 
3 60 
8 50 

2 50 

3 00 
1 20 

13 68 

1 25 
5 13 

13 50 

12 50 

3 70 

5 00 

2 70 
52 09 

7 20 

40 
I) 75 

6 41) 
5 58 

10 00 

II .-,11 

5 mi 
16 53 

1 so 

6 26 



31 OS 

7 .Mi 

.'ii 26 

15 mi 

28 60 

i. 75 



Shops — Concluded . 



Thread, linen, 30 lbs 

Tailor's shears, 4 prs . . . 
Tailor's measures, 2 doz. 

Tailor's stove, 1 

Travelling expenses. . . . 
Wire rivets. 130 lbs . . . 

Whiting, 336 lbs 

Wove wire, 1 roll 

Wax, 2 gross 

Wrenches, 2 

Wrench jaw 

Well trimmers, 1 doz . . . 
Washers, 25 lbs 



Mack inery. 



Pumps. 2 

Windmill pump, 1 



Furnishings. 

Baize, 20 yds 

Blankets,'l9S prs 

Chairs, 1 doz 

Chair bottoms, 1 doz 

Cupboard catches, 1 doz . . . 

Napkins, ^ doz 

Oilcloth. 6 pieces 

Pillows, 2 

Pillow cases, 8 

Packing cases 

Quilt, 1 

Sheets, 8 

Soap, castile, 45 lbs 

Soap, shaving, lOSbars . . . 

Ticking, 247} vds 

Table cloths. 2 

Towels. 2 doz 

\ 
Utensils and Vehicles 



Blue, 10 lbs 

Barber's clippers. 3 pairs. 

Brooms, hair, 1 doz 

Brushes, scrub, 12 doz. . . 
Brushes, stencil, 1 doz. . . 
Brushes, stove, 1 doz. . . . 
Brushes, bannister, 7 doz. 

Brushes, hair, i doz 

Bath brick, 3 

Bob sleighs, 1 set 

Bucksaw blades, 24 

Bucksaw frames. 2 doz. . . 
Butcher knives, \ doz. . .. 

Chair bottoms. 1 doz 

Cupboard locks, 1 

Castings, sundry 

Combs, 19 doz 

Crockeryware 

Cutlery, table, 1 doz 

Cylinders, 1 

clocks, repairs to 

Cartridges, 3,050 

Cod-line, 1 hank 

i Jock dials, l box 

Carbines, 6 

Dredge boxes, 4fc doz. . . . 

I lus< pans, 2 doz 

1 drawing pins, 2 doi 

Elbows, f> 

Faucets, J doz 



S cts. 

61 50] 

22 50 

90 
9 00 

70 45 

23 40 

4 20 
3 97 

1 SO 
1 SO 
3 25 

5 00 
1 43 



3,135 


35 


61 
205 


00 
00 


266 


00 



12 00 

452 50 

7 56 

3 00 

1 28 

2 63 
15 00 

2 50 



1 76 

2 00 

2 no 

22 00 

4 77 
12 4s 

117 34 

11 00 

5 00 



674 82 



2 50 

9 15 

7 26 

14 85 

2 7n 

2 In 

30 82 

3 13 

2 25 

31 oo 
14 86 

3 50 

4 29 
3 00 
1 50 
6 25 

24 si i 
j 50 

1 75 

2 92 
1 1 85 
47 07 

ii 15 

1 50 
so 28 

2 to 
i 80 
50 
ii 76 
n _'t 



EXPENDITURE 



167 



SESSIONAL PAPER No 34 



Manitoba — Continued. 



i'sfrtisils and Vehicles — Concluded. 



Freight and express 

Hones, 2 

Kecys, 4 

Lamp chimneys, 44 doz. 

Lamp burner?, 24 doz. . 
Lamp scissors. 2 pairs. . 
Lamp collars, 1 gross. ... 

Lamp wick, 4 

Lamps, 5 

Laundry stoves, 1 

Lanterns. 3 doz 

Lantern globes, 12 -1<>/ 
Lantern burners, 2 doz. . 

Locks 

Nippers, 1 pair 

Pumps, 2 

Pails, fibre. 19 doz 

Pails, galv., 2 doz 

Pail ears. 20 lbs 

Pans. 12 doz 

Plates, 1 doz 

Padlocks, 3§ doz 

Perforators, 4 

Packing cases 

Razors, 1^ doz 

Shears, grass, 1 pair. . . . 

Scissors, 10 pairs 

Spoons, table. 1 gross. 
Starch, laundry. 20 lbs. . 

Shovels. 1 doz 

Soup dishes, 5£ doz 

Stencils. 4 sets 

Toilet sets, 2 

Thermometers, f> 

Telephones, 1 

Telephone repairs 

Towelling, 300 yds 

Taps, 3 

Tea cups. 10 doz 

Whisks, 2 doz 

Wicks, oil stove, J doz. . 
Wash basins, 6 doz 



* Land, Buildings and Walls, 

Axle pulleys, 7 doz 

Cement. 135 brls 

Castings, 143 lbs 

Coal tar, 5 galls 

Containers 

Down pipe 

Expanded metal, 1 1 680 sq. ft. . 

Flanges, 220 lbs 

Flooring, 5,035 ft 

Flue lining, 148 ft 

Freight and express 

Glazier's points, 1 doz. papers 



$ cts. 


9 42 


76 


2 00 


JO 85 


10 95 


34 


3 00 


2 10 


4 00 


4 90 


15 00 


7 90 


2 10 


27 


2 50 


14 58 


155 39 


6 20 


3 00 


21 12 


1 00 


36 50 


3 32 


SO 


16 75 


1 50 


5 91 


3 96 


1 20 


10 55 


S SI 


1 90 


4 00 


2 10 


8 75 


15 62 


30 00 


1 01 


6 15 


3 00 


90 


5 52 


79S 87 


4 55 


436 25 


5 00 


1 25 


1 60 


7 20 


184 80 


S SO 


162 19 


44 40 


546 65 


1 on 



Land, Buildings and Walls — Con. S cts. 

Glass, 2,200 ft 77 00 

Hose, rubber, 50 ft 7 25 

Hinges, 12& doz. pairs 6 21 

Iron, assorted. 24,979 lbs 74S 56 

Iron, sheet, 156 lbs 5 85 

Labour, drilling well 1,075 00 

Lumber. 95.693 ft 3,664 92 

Laths, 40,000 136 00 

Lime. 990 bush 214 06 

Metallic lathing, 57] ' ; sq. yds 251 62 

Moulding, 225 ft. ...... 6 75 

Nuts, square, 40 lbs 2 67 

Nuts, hexagon, 75 lbs 2 51 

Nails, iron, 173 lbs 7 61 

Nails, wire, 39 kegs 144 49 

Posts, redar, 109 106 75 

Paper, wall. 14 rolls 9 10 

Plasterer's hair, 5 bales 5 35 

Plaster, 6 brls 21 60 

Poles, tamarac, 35 135 63 

Putty. 453 lbs 12 55 

Packing case 05 

Rivets, 6,000 1 3S 

Screws, asstd., 134§- gross 26 69 

Sashes, window, 40 132 00 

Sashes, storm, 3 3 90 

Sash cord, 20 hanks 16 45 

Sash weights, S00 lbs 28 00 

Staples. 20 lbs 76 

Solder, 246 lbs 49 20 

Soil pipe, 27 ft 5 50 

Sheet lead, 104A lbs 6 79 

Steel, 317 lbs 30 IS 

Travel, departmental officers 209 66 

Travel, penitentiarv officers 1 27 45 

Fire bolts, 400. . . ' 2 00 

Wire, 5 lbs 28 

White lead, 250 lbs 13 47 

Whiting. 2.132 lbs [ 26 65 



Advertising and Travel. 

Advertising 'Tenders for supplies'.. 

Travel, departmental officers 

Travel, penitentiary officers 

Less — Refunds 



Special. 

Payment to Stony Mountain school 
district in lieu of officers' taxes. . 



8,725 58 



42 711 



200 00 
152 so 



695 
98 


50 
37 


.V.I7 


13 


250 


00 



Total 



69,108 03 



168 



DEPARTUEXT OF JUSTICE 



Manitoba — Co ntinu ed. 

RECAPITULATION". 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



Staff— 

Salaries and retiring allowances 

Uniforms and mess 

Maintenance of Convicts — 

Rations 

Clothing and medicines 

IKscharge Expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances 

Transfers and interments 

Working Expenses — 

Heat, light and water 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery 

Chapels, school and library < 

Office expenses 

Industries — 

Farm 

Trade shops 

Prison Equipment — 

Machinery 

Furnishings 

Utensils and vehicles 

Land, buildings and walls 

M i'-ctllaneous — ■ 

Advertising and travel 

Payment to Stony Mountain school district in lieu of officers taxes 



$ cts. 

28,837 54 
2,953 28 



5,576 68 
4,539 02 



1.517 49 
206 00 



5.645 56 

2.330 SO 

221 98 

1.104 29 



1,907 64 
3,135 35 



266 00 

674 82 

798 S7 

8,725 5S 



597 13 
250 00 



S cte. 

31,790 S2 
9,93.5 70 
1.723 49 

9,302 63 
5,04. 

6S,260 90 

S47 13 
69.10S 03 



EXPEXDI'ICRE 



169 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



British Columbia. 



Salaries. 

Warden, 1 year 

Deputy warden, 1 year 

Chaplain, Protestant, 1 year 

Chaplain, Roman Catholic, 1 year . . 

Surgeon, 1 year 

Accountant, 1 year 

Storekeeper, 1 year 

Steward, 1 year 

Hospital overseer, <fcc, 1 year 

Chief trade instructor, 9 months. . . . 
Trade instructors, 2 at $750, 1 year 
Trade instructors, 4 at $700, 1 year 
Trade instructor, 1 . 3 months . . . 

Keepers, 2 at S600, 1 year 

Guards, 11, S600, 1 year 

Guards, broken periods 



Uniforms. 

Buttons, gilt, 3 gross 

Calfskin, 75 lbs 

Elastic, 1} yds 

Felt padding, 19 yds. . . . 

Frieze, 104 yds 

Freight 

Gloves, 2+. doz 

Hats, troopers', 31 

Hair cloth, 52+ yds 

Kangaroo skin, 15 ft ... . 
Leather, sole, 3694 lbs. . . 

Leather, welt, 14 lbs 

Leather, pebble. 40+ lbs. 

Lining, 5SJ yds 

Porpoise skin, 1 

Packing cases 

Postage 

Rubber tissue, 1 lb 

Shoe blacking, 2 doz 

Silesia. 130} vds 

Serge, 264 yds 

Scarlet cloth, 5 yds 

Wadding, 50 yds 

Waterproof coats, 2 



Pol"' \1- 

Beef, 1,235 lbs 

Butter, 364 lbs 

Baking soda. S 1 bs 

Codfish, 22 lbs 

Fruit, evaporated. 1 .327* lbs 

Mustard, 6 lbs 

Pork, 21 lbs 

Peaches, canned, 50 lbs 

Salmon, 2S5 lbs 

Sugar, 400 lbs 

Seasoning, 2 lbs 

Tea, 50 lbs 



Rations. 

Beef, fresh, 17,372 lbs 

Beef, canned, 6 cases 

Beans, 2,049 lbs 

Barlev, 200 lbs 

Butter, 28 lbs 

Christmas extras, sundries . . 

Corn meal, 850 lbs 

Flour, 118brls 

Flour, 12,\| tons 

Fruit, evaporated. 3,397 II. 



S its 

2,000 00 
1,500 00 
800 00 
800 00 
600 00 
1,200 00 
800 00 
800 00 
800 00 
750 00 

r.soo oo 

2,800 00 

174 99 

1,200 00 

6,600 00 

720 99 



23,045 98, 



9 56 
48 62 

1 28 
6 46 

130 36 
26 36 
28 93 
39 46 
13 13 
4 20 

104 49 

4 90 

5 27 
64 31 

6 00 
35 

2 80 

90 

1 60 
23 49 

593 55 
9 74 

2 50 
26 61 



1,154 .87 



101 29 

87 36 

70 

1 32 
73 88 

2 40 
1 89 
4 50 

17 52 

25 00 

70 

13 75 



330 31 



1,409 91 

49 50 

71 71 

7 00 

6 72 

14 45 

17 00 

575 00 

1.153 90 

224 55 



Rations — Concluded. 

Freight and express 

Lard, 340 lbs 

Pork, 312 lbs 

Prunes, 250 lbs 

Potatoes, 1 ton 

Potatoes, 2 bags 

Pepper, 100 lbs 

Rolled oats. 1,080 lbs 

Salmon. 4.731 lbs 

Sugar, 3.100 lbs 

Salt, 3,200 lbs 

Syrup, 4.327 lbs 

Suet, 25 lbs 

Tea, 330 lbs 

Vinegar, 46 galls 

Yeast, 101 lbs 



Clothing. 

Buttons, trouser, 30 gross. 

Freight and express 

Hats straw, 6 doz 

Leather, sole, 555+ lbs 

Leather, upper. 111+ lbs 

Leather, buff, 112 J ft 

Leather, cordovan. 103+. ft . .. 

Leather, kip, 3S lbs 

Moth balls, 2 lbs 

Packing cases 

Prison uniform cloth, 464$ yds 

Sheepskins, 2 J doz 

Underclothing, suits, 12 doz. . 



Medicine and Hospital Comforts 

Drugs, 

Fluid beef. 1 lb . . 

Keep of insane prisoners 

Labels 

Professional services, consultations 

Spectacles. 7 prs 

Scott's emulsion. 1 doz 



Freedom Stat 

Braces. 2 doz 

Baling 

Cordovan. 28 fl 

Calfskin. 17 lbs 

Freight 

Felt, padding, lit vds 
Leather, sole, 260} lbs . . . 

Leather, welt, 6 lbs 

Rubber tissue, 1 lb 

Tweed, discharge. 892 yds 



Allowances. 

Allowances, including railway fan- 
to twentv-three convicts 



Transfers. 

Travelling expense.- removing con- 
vict to reformatorv in Vancouver. 



S cts. 

148 82 
37 40 
28 ns 
12 50 
2ii no 
2 00 
14 00 
37 SO 

283 44 

131 75 
26 10 

10S 19 

2 06 

61 95 

11 50 

30 30 



t is;, ,,;: 



3 00 
13 32 

9 00 
139 43 
39 03 
13 53 
15 49 
22 04 

50 

1 80 
243 87 

19 63 
I 17 10 



667 74 



206 96 
90 

76 43 

3 19 

10 00 

10 00 



309 73 



2 )n 

1 25 
4 20 
9 86 

13 40 

6 16 

68 33 

2 10 
90 

313 40 



452 30 



I' i.-, i,ii 



x 30 



170 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



British Columbia — Continued . 



Heat, Light and Water. 

Coal, 42 1. ;.,;,';,', tons 

Coal oil. 156 galls 

Candles, 10 lbs 

Electric- light, 

Gas 

Matches, 2 tins 

Sperm oil, + gall 

Water, 

Water gauges. 1 



Maintenance of Buildings and 
Machinery. 

Alum. 1 lb 

Butt hinges, 4 doz 

Babbit metal. 10 lbs 

Burnt sienna, 11 lbs 

Bends, 3 

Bushings, 2 

Belt lacing, 2A lbs 

Brass wire, 3 lbs 

Burrs. 2 lbs 

Chronie yellow, 25 lbs 

Chrome green, 50 lbs 

Closets, 1 

Cupboard catches, 1 doz 

Coal tar, 2 brls 

Cotton waste, 10 lbs 

Colours. 10 lbs 

Cocks. 3 

Castings, 150 lbs 

Caps, 6 

Copper wire, J lb 

Carbolinium, 343.1 galls 

Check valves, 1 

Dryers, 75 lbs 

Dampers, 1 

Drawer pulls. 2 doz 

Drop black, 10 lbs 

Elbows, 51 

Electric light installed in warden's 

residence 

Fly paper, 2 boxes 

Freight 

Fire clay, 100 lbs 

Gauge glasses, 3 doz 

Glue, 30 lbs 

Gasoline, 42 galls 

( ila-ss, 400 ft 

Globe valves, 2 

Gold size, 1 qrt 

Gold bronze. 1 pckg 

Iron, square, ."it lbs 

Iron, round. 1,105 lbs 

Iron, flat, 104 lbs 

Iron, Norway, l L8 lbs 

Iron, galvanized, 45 lbs 

Hard oil finish, 8 galls 

1 UngeS, 44 doz 

I leaders, 2 

Hose coupling, 1 . , . 

Hose bibs. 2 

Ice, 3,232 lbs 

Lumber, asstd., 32,915 ft ... . 

Lye, 192 lbs . . 

Feather belting, 20 It 

I latches, cupboard, 19 

Mark, 5 lbs 

Labour. 4 hrs 

Laces, 12 

Lining, tank 

Mineral o\ide, 330 galls 

Mantles, l doz 



S cts. 



1,964 13 


50 25 


1 00 


85 14 


1,396 97 


2 50 


1 00 


114 72 


3 00 


3,618 71 


10 


7 75 


2 00 


2 .".ii 


1 85 


40 


2 56 


1 50 


1 00 


6 25 


7 50 


6 00 


1 20 


16 00 


1 00 


2 50 


5 85 


10 92 


30 


38 


343 50 


1 50 


11 25 


50 


1 50 


2 50 


9 51 


90 85 


1 95 


63 42 


2 50 


1 70 


4 50 


14 70 


28 3S 


5 25 


(i 63 


ii 25 


1 89 


35 00 


3 33 


5 'Ml 


3 60 


18 00 


13 02 


3 30 


25 


1 30 


16 16 


655 89 


15 36 


l 60 


l 90 


1 mi 


2 in 


ii 60 




13 44 


1 00 



Maintenance of Buildings and 
Mach inery — Concluded. 

Methylated spirits, 1 gall 

Xails, 115 lbs 

Xails, 9 kegs 

Nipples, 3 

Octagon steel. 149 lbs 

Oil, linseed, 49 galls 

Oil stones. 2 

Oakum, 1 bale 

Pearless packing, &\ lbs 

Pitch, 20 lbs 

Plum bibs, + doz 

Pumice stone, 2 lbs 

Pipe, iron, 64S ft 

Pipe. iron. 54 lbs 

Paint. 50 lbs 

Prussian blue, 10 lbs 

Prussian blue. 4 pekgs 

Padlocks. 4 

Plugs. 6 

Resin, 35 lbs 

Red lead. 110 lbs . ._ 

Rim locks. \ doz . ." 

Springs, door, 2 

Stoves, 2 

Screen wire, 300 ft 

Sweet oil, 1 quart 

Screws, 3S§ gross 

Shafting, 21 lbs 

Soap, laundrv, 1 ,930 lbs 

Sash cord. 300 ft 

Stove pipe, 27 lengths 

Stove pipe. 51 ft 

Soil pipe, 66 ft 

Shellac, J gall 

Sapolio, 1 doz 

Steel, 55 lbs 

Tees, 8 

Turpentine. 41 1 galls 

Taper pipe, 1 

Tar paper. 5 rolls 

Tacks, 3 pekgs 

Toilet paper, 500 pekgs 

Unions. 15 

Venetian, 75 lbs 

Wire cloth. 1 roll 

White lead. 800 lbs 

Weather strips. 72 ft 

Wire, clothesline. 400 ft 

Wire, stovepipe, 1 lb 

Wire rope, 20 ft 

Wire netting. 1 yd 

Washers, 21 1 1 »— 



Chapels, School and Library 

Bibles and hymn books 

< Organists' salaries 

Stationery 

Subscriptions to magazines, &c 



Office Expenses. 
Freight and express 

Mais. 1 

Premium on officers 1 bonds 

Postage 

Post office keys. 2 . 
Printing forms, books, A c 
Stationery, sundries 



$ cts. 



2 45 

4 65 

35 00 
1 45 

22 35 

36 83] 
1 70 

5 00 
7 70 

I 00- 

4 5(1 

II 40 
85 14 
is 7.". 

7 50 

6 25 
96 

3 80 

30 

1 75 

5 SO 

3 00 
30 

7 00 

6 75 
75 

19 20 

64 
82 03 

4 50 

3 35 

5 10 
9 90 

4 00 

1 40 

5 25 
82 

47 73 

30 
5 00 

1 00 
31 50 

7 115 
11 25 

1 25 
60 on 

s 04 

2 00 
20 
n on 
75 

2 .;.-. 



2.osl 


31 


30 
100 

1 

7S 


03 
00 

13 

98 


211 


04 



35 13 

1 1 00 

21 on 

12 50 

1 oo 

269 07 

106 29 






EXPEyniTVRE 



171 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



British Columbia — Continued. 



Farm — Concluded 



Telephone. 
Telegrams. 



Farm. 

Axles, 2 

Axle grease, 2 doz 

Bran, 6 tons 

Bolts, 6 doz 

Bits, 3 

Buckle, brass. 1 , 

Caldrons, 2 

Curry combs, 6 , 

Celluloid rings, 1 doz 

Forks, hay, ^ doz , 

Fork handles, 2 doz , 

Fertilizer. 1 ton , 

Freight 

< irain brewed, 82 brew s . . 

Grain refuse, 8 tons 

Grain refuse. 27 loads . . . 

Harness oil, 30 tins 

Harness leather, 99 lbs . . . 

Half rims, 2 

Horse blankets, 1 pr 

Harness oil, 1 doz 

Handles, 3 doz 

Horseshoe pads. 11 prs . . 

Horseshoes, 1 keg 

Horses, 2 

Hoes, £ doz 

Knife. 1 

Lumber, oak, 15 ft 

Manure, 344 loads 

Oats, 51^5" tons 

Ploughs, furrow. 2 

Plough standard, 1 

Mower, 1 

Mower, sundry parts of . . 

Rubber boots, 6 prs 

Rubber horseshoes, 12 prs 

Rakes, garden. 7 

Russett dressing, 2 boxes . 

Steamer pail, 1 

Sugar of lead 

Seeds, sundry 

Shovels, 2 doz 

Shovel handles, 1 doz. . . . 

Spades, 1 doz 

Spade handles, 1 doz 

Saddle tree, 1 

Seed drill, 1 

Scvthes, 3 

Shorts, 500 lbs 

Veterinary services 

Watering can, 1 

Wagon tongue, 1 



Shops. 

Awls, 2\ gross 

Awl hafts, 10 doz 

Axes, \ doz 

Axe handles. 2 doz 

Augurs. ,^ doz 

Augur bits, 4, 

Brushes, tar, 2 doz 

Brushes, shoe, 1 ,'> doz .. . 
Brushes, paint, 12 doz . . . 
Brushes, varnish, '2\ do/ 
Brushes, whitewash. 1 doz 
Boot webbing, 72 yds . . . 



$ cts. 


115 95 


60 59 


669 43 


5 00 


3 50 


138 00 


60 


1 55 


10 


33 00 


1 20 


4 80 


3 00 


5 40 


40 00 


32 75 


41 00 


18 00 


60 75 


7 50 


28 71 


1 75 


4 50 


1 00 


7 80 


18 60 


3 90 


725 00 


2 70 


75 


3 00 


171 50 


405 09 


55 00 


4 50 


60 00 


2 40 


9 90 


24 40 


4 35 


70 


60 


25 


41 86 


24 00 


3 60 


12 00 


3 60 


40 


100 00 


3 75 


6 45 


17 00 


75 


3 50 


2,149 46 


5 45 


3 80 


.', on 


S 40 


50 


is 60 


4 50 


3 50 


26 00 


s 7.', 


6 00 


1 68 



S h <>ps — Concluded . 

Bar, copper. V2\ lbs 

Blue print paper, 3 rolls 

Chalk lines, 4 doz 

Cork soles, 3 doz prs 

Compasses, 1 pr 

Compass saws, 3 

Chisels, 1 

Castings, 17 lbs 

Coal, 5 tons 

Drill, twist, 1 

Drill, core, 1 

Drill, ratchet. 1 

Draw knives, 2 

Files, 13 doz 

File cards, 2 

Freight 

Harness needles. 3 papers 

Linen thread, IS lbs 

Machine thread. \\ doz 

Machine silk, 7 lbs 

Moulds, repairs to 

Magazines. 2 

Muriatic acid, 1 gall 

Xails, iron. 30 lbs 

Nails, brass, 60 lbs 

Xails, horseshoe, 25 lbs 

Xeedles. sewing, 40 papers 

Xeedles, machine, 2 doz 

Nest of saws. 1 

Overstock wheels, 4 

Oil. sewing machine. 1 pint 

Punch, spring. 1 

Pulleys, 2 

Panel saw, 1 

Pencils, camel's hair, 1 doz 

Packing cases 

Rounding iron. 1 

Rules, 1 doz 

Shears. 9 pairs 

Sidewalk groover, 1 

Shoe tacks. S lbs 

Shoe thread, 6 lbs 

Shoe rivets, 6 lbs 

Shoe elastic, 2 yds , . 

Shoe hooks. 2£ gross 

Shoe knives' 2 doz 

Sewing machine parts 

Sand paper, IS quires 

Steel, 54 lbs 

Steel octagon, 102 lbs 

Stationery, sundries 

Shovels, 2 doz 

Screen wire, 300 feet 

Sledge handles, 10 doz 

Spoke shaves. 2 

Sheep skins.346i feet 

Sable oil. i gall.* 

Subscription to Tailor and Cutter 

Trowels. S 

Tailor's stove, 1 

Tailor's chalk, 2 boxes. 

Technical books 

Tape, 7 gross 

Tape, adhesive, 12 rolls 

Vise 

Vise, screw 

AYood. 1 14 t-ords 

Sundry small tools 



Machinery. 



$ cts. 



Power drill machine. 



4 38 


3 45 


1 40 


1 50 


1 10 


1 50 


1 25 


2 55 


100 00 


50 


50 


4 50 


1 50 


28 73 


1 20 


2 43 


45 


41 4(( 


2 33 


49 00 


28 85 


70 


2 00 


1 65 


16 80 


3 90 


1 00 


5 25 


1 25 


4 40 


25 


1 75 


1 00 


2 00 


60 


30 


5 00 


6 00 


11 25 


1 35 


96 


5 40 


3 60 


1 70 


1 25 


2 00 


3 60 


6 70 


2 70 


15 30 


12 65 


24 00 


1, 7.-. 


3 


tin 


■_'s 'It 


1 65 


A III) 


s SI I 


25 on 


1 30 


2 to 


3 15 


11 24 


Jll 11(1 


5 55 


370 50 


11 •-Ml 


1,037 09 


75 on 

I... 



172 



DEPA.RT1IEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



British Columbia — Continued. 



Furnishings, 

Blankets, 20 pairs. . . . 
Chair bottoms, 1 doz.. 

Clock repairs 

Castors, 14 sets 

Drawer locks, 6 

Freight and expres-. 
Hair felt. 1,500 feet . . 

Packing cases, 

Quilts, 68 

Soap, castile, 360 lbs. . 
Soap, shaving, 19 lbs. . 
Stove bolts, 300 lbs. . . 
Ticking, 159J yards . . 



Utensils and Vehicles. 



Armoury services 

Axle ends 

Barber's combs. \ doz 

Buckets, 1 doz 

Bath brick, 1 box 

Bucksaws, 1 

Buggy spokes, 3 doz 

Cement 

Clocks, 1 

Clothes line, wire, 4.50 ft. . 

Can openers, 1 

Coffee pots, 4 

Choppers, food. 1 

Combs, 6 doz 

Clothes pins. 3 gross 

Copper, 20 lbs 

Clock repairs 

Fly paper, 3 boxes 

Forks, table, 6 doz 

Frying pans. 6 

Freight 

Grindstones. 1 

Galvanized pails. 12 doz. . 
Hair clipper springs. 1 doz . 

Lanterns, 6 

Lantern globes, 5 

Lamp chimnies, 3 

Mouse traps, 1 doz 

Muskrat traps, 3 

Neck yoke. 1 

Oil stone, 1 

Oiler 

Rat traps. 6 

Range, parts of 

Spoons, table. 1 gross . . . 

Spoons, tea, 2 doz 

Soup plates, tin, ■'! doz. . . 

Saucers, 3 doz 

Sauce pans, 2 

Soda, 4 lbs 

Sprinklers. 1 



S cts. 

84 84 
3 00 

1 50 
6 40 

2 40 
23 99 

85 50 
2 25 

127 70 

32 40 

6 65 

1 50 

32 70 



410 S3 



24 00 
1 35 

1 20 

2 85 

80 

1 00 
6 00 
25 
50 

2 25 
25 
8 
3 
4 
2 
5 
4 
1 
5 
2 



00 
00 
:.n 
40 
40 
25 
95 
85 
14 

35 

1 00 
72 15 

1 00 
9 10 
65 
20 
60 
75 

85 

35 
(i ;ii i 

1 25 
3 7(1 
1 00 

1 20 

2 10 
2 00 
(i :>o 
1 00 



UstejtsUs and Vehicles — Concluded. 

Shot gun repairs 

Target requisites 

Typewriter 

Teapot 

Towels, 6 

Wagon pole 

Wooden pails. 1 doz 

Wooden pails, 1 doz 

Whisks, 6 doz 

Whet stones 



Land, Buildings and Walls 

Acid, muriatic, 1 gall 

Bushings, 3 

Beams, 6,048 lbs 

Castings, 14.243 lbs 

Cartage 

Cement, 615 brls 

Closet bowels, 36 

Elbows, 118 

Freight and express 

Flushometers, IIS 

Floor flanges. 5 

Glass. 100 feet 

Half Y branches 

Hexigon nuts. 16 lbs 

Iron, 6,748 lbs 

Iron fence, 50 feet 

Iron gates, 2 

Lumber, 22.543 feet 

Lime, 155 brls 

Metal, expanded, 4,320 feet 

Pig lead, 1,000 lbs 

Pipe, 180 feet 

Reducers, 1 

Rope, 343 lbs 

Rivets, 2 pkgs 

Roofing cement. 15 brls 

Steel pipe, 38 pieces 

Sash cord, 600 feet 

Spuds, 123 

Traps, 4 in., 6 

Travelling expenses (penitentiary 

architect") 

Window prisms. 12 panels 

Wash basins, enamel, 120 



Advertising and Travel. 

A'h .-rtising tenders for suppl 
Travelling expenses, penitentiary 

officers 



Total 



$ cts. 

1 25 

2 00 

65 00 



25 
50 
00 
50 



9 60 
1 00 



270 60 



2 no 

1 2(i 
L87 4d 
507 93 

ii 25 

2,152 50 

275 4(1 

9 S4 
1.264 71 
1,239 (in 

2 .".ii 

8 00 
13 50 

1 92 
227 80 
150 mi 
200 oil 
3S0 1 I 
ISC, (in 

:;ss mi 
38 50 
25 48 

61 74 

l 65 

140 17 

19 00 

9 25 
43 05 
12 no 

27 i«i 
608 00 
384 00 

S.571 05 



64 80 

ltil 60 



226 Id 



50,274 18 



EXPENDITURE 



173 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



British Columbia — Continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 



Staff— 

Salaries and retiring allowances. 
Uniforms and mess 



Maintenance of Convicts — 

Rations 

Clothing and medicine . 



Discharge Expenses — 

Freedom suits and allowances. 
Transfers and interments 



Working Expenses — . . 

Heat, , light and water 

Maintenance of buildings and machinery. 

Chapels, school and library 

Office expenses 



Industries — 

Farm 

Trade shops. 



Prison Equipment — 

Machinery 

Furnisliings 

Utensils and vehicles 

Lands, buildings and walls. 

Miscella n eous — 

Advertising and travel. . . . 



$ cts 

23,045 98 
1,4S5 18 



4,485 


63 


977 


47 


947 


90 


8 


30 



3.61S 71 

2,084 31 

211 04 

669 43 



2.149 46 
1,037 09 



75 00 

410 S3 

270 60 

8,571 05 



$ cts. 



24,531 16 



5.463 10 



956 20 



6.5S3 49 



3 186 55 



9,327 Is 

226 40 

$50,274 38 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX L 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



175 



176 



DEPAKTMEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



SOQOOQQeOQQOQOQOQQOQOQOQQQOQQOOOOOQOOOOOOO 





— i- i- r~. :: ~ x i- i-- c — ^. r; — -i i - ri -r zr. z^. s, t m : u- « « l*. « « l: c r. r r. c- ~ x rt u- ~- ~ 
Aaoooc}aoiQ«aoo5oao»criosaQoagodog ~ ~ t. t. t. r~. — . s o o x x 
x x x ~ ~ x x x x x x c~. — x ~ x — . x x - x x x o>aoooQ9o:coaDaDcoQOooac r: — r: x x 


2 |l 

- H - 


tJ cf -t* co — ~ £:" i—"* id" «— i-T — I-* rH ■— " — " ■* — " so — * —' — ' ? T — *" i *T r; e£ .— *" r-T — " — T ^T ~-~ — " ,-T — T _" — ' — ' __* t Z •— " — " 
r-i i-H 03 Tl — Tl ?1 n ri 



- £ £ 

— ■_ = 



C. C- t^ rt W ~. — ■ t^ t^ Q *r "C SO 94 i - ? 1 CC 03 l." X E 

en r: cr. :r. © r. r. — r. — . sn r. » 3c < 

X X x x — X X X X X X X X X e 



^rii-r.'i^tx 



: o n -r .r. l- r~. ■_- x l^ c. r: 



r-T- r-r to — d *»-i r»o — • 
— — cc 









S J Spy is H 
—. Z < — ^ —. 



i < § -/. 4 z •? S <s ; 



g>JS teg, 



<t-i *h»iq r-< c~ca cqaOAi 



:^-r- ii^Ltc^KOsc: 






XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXCCXXaDbOaoaOOCXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 

x".~*x'?f ce -f^tt cTcf x'i~cT:£~t~ :£ ^»o^~:c'^~~"?i*^-~'7j'.--:"— r-i n'x'o'i- rc'r^t-,*-';--' cTn :s~ 

*-, ,-t r- .-* r- ,-» C*5 — C'l « CN ~ 71 — X 71 ?) 71 — ?1 M . — Tl — r- — M ?] 71 71 

— — — — — — _ 

< t r. ~ < <^A%<7. O <3 <^. OOh ~.4 <> :: .4<^<Z'l r. ~<-. ~ v. - 



o 



M 




LIST OF OFFICERS 



177 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



scoCBCCBBBBBBBBBBCBBBBCCBBCBBeBBBCB BCBCCccrccc 
: ic '.*: cinio ua id *-■: in m i-t o l~ 10 *.- 10 '"- ic ic >-" »c »c »c iq ib ic t-~ *n .b .n ib <B *b ic u ta ia ia j- c i-: c c ic :b 



£ = £3 Z? 2? S2 ~ ^T — £ £- £ ii- iC- = 2 2? £• b: :v- ^ = ° — = = £ " ^! — •- • 1 Z- 2 ~ ^T ~ TT Tt ^T x £ 2 Bi L 1 "*" ^ 
5: x X x 5; x" 5: x x x x w X x x x x x x X x B. B- B. B. b. B: b. ?- 5- b. B: B. r; ~ 5- b. T- B. B. x" x x x b. B- x 



r 0J_ _ B Jjta, 1 



g ^ - r. 






- => £ - 

- © - 












-" z - =_: 



© © 



N 05 CI CC -r -f -r i* IO IQ iQ iC ffiXX ©■ © — . — . O © O Q © 

© © OS © © © — © © ~ © © © © © © © © © © © © © © 

qo qo So co 00 00 00 x x x x =0 oc cc x cc ■ x x x ©. © © © © 



DOC 

© © © 



1 ? I C 1 CC 

8© © © 
© © © 



oo© © 
© © © © 



•*r tp -** © t 

© © © © © 

© © © X CO 



© © Ol 0-1 CM 
© © © O t- 
X X © © 00 



— CI 01 01 OJ 



,0 ; a 



— 3_£ — 















r.csHCXiNL';io^ioo)(oa»Hc;a3ioxNaKCHOr-«stcc-^ - iO-)'L';c< 
; *c a x l: i- i~ l^ © © t^. o ■© t- © 1 - © t-- © t-- t- © t^ n. t-- 1 - n n- - t - x -t <.- c c h- o *--: 

r, X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X ■ X X X X X X X X X X X X X 



©CC © 

iS »- © 

X X X 



ri cc x © - 
«.*: © o © u 
x x cc ac ; 



©. -* CD i>- ©- ir. »c x © "f cc cc cc t - cc n © © — -r -r © ci x t- - /. nct. c © «*: rccc — r rt x. w ci 



Cl *- — 1-. CM 0-1 



= O § o £*0 « 5 J; - 






g, 6f >>^' d 



'E &C >> y 

— S - ^ 



■T) ' 

■ a ' 

'■5 Uri 

2 - a S 



y s y 



13 a 



S 2 . J B ° 



oO.SO So 
■Oh j= e"S --= - 

^c 5 . j j*S° 
J o ~_H §2 o^ 3 



— 

B 

^"5 :; 5 



= © 



I o o . S e .a 

S-.-B S "g 'S.'S 



tn o ai S Ph % 03 



• _, o » 

x = - 



'§6.1 



— 

s 

ig : '"i 

SO 0.20 



K<5 -K^tKO^JS 



.SO.! 

■o -*o 
030 

: *J H -« 

l2 QuS 



■m~ 

CO CO 

.b ej= a 
= " 5 2 d 

3 B B B 

.b or q 

otfoas 






E a 




£ . 


BS 


0°° 


© ^ 


Qw 


it 




£S 


: a 


b a 


'i'S 


X% 






O „ 




: - - 




U ^-1 




— ci 


= *' 



e a 



178 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Q Q O — O O 3 ~ 

^ ^- fi fr3 fi x r. -3 x : n x S ^ c^ n i' i^ n c- 1- frj i a -i ffl a x a 5 iS o S c in to o 






ts £ s 

a -3 
— °* 



Stt n £ :i :i k ?; r. x e o :i r*. c c c - - :i c c r. i - ■? n 3". c :i r; l- l* x l: x r. ^ -r t- x x r. 
— x t. — x o t- »cor.r.x~r.^:ooooo»3)a>a)aQQ00030nmac ga r. r~- r-. r. r~. 
— . — . x x :r. x c: x x x x x x x x x r-. :r-. ft * . — r~. x so oo aoac ft — . — - r. r. xxxxxxxxx x 



S «c^ 



. o • >. - 

: c s :* u 



p «3 3i3 3 09J 

h^ pc, 1-5 1-3 Sha C^< 



« 






< 



a-, zr. t- 
rr. ft x 

X X X 



£- - 
X c: 



O c^ « *«• 
x r t - r- 
x c. x x 



CO O 

X X 



?i:Ki..-.r-r-HNntxcMNN , Ji-?xr.?:i.*x?.r',Ti'h 
xx xiaoffiOONOONaKixr.r.cx^axxx x — r-. r. 

X X X x x x r. — x — - X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 



x x r-. 
r: ft 3-. 

XXX 



d a c 

— — — 

e8-X! ti 






— 






j-S a = 8.33 3»3 = -S = 5 = - 



W* - CJ *^ (fl H " 3 u ~^ajzj™-" ■ w h Q.*j n S ; =- 

■ -*.3 <-.-t -=o 2-/:^<:<; -.-.z~.z< 



H^iKHOSXMr:!'- o ?o -f *r — o h i- k>h in .1 r. ■; o c r. i* t m n ; :". •; ^ ?: c r: ^ c - 
<r t£ -Z ^f t~ -*• -~ -r iT t l~. ~ -v ~v if. -j: .-. •j-Jti-vf 23 -^ t- *.£ r- fc^ a iQ -*■ u~ -f :r ^ t^ 53 -~ t- 1- 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
^JiNec « c>i ^- s^ ^ - 1 - 1 ph ?i _- - ?j n -- *) ?i - ti t-i ?j n — — iHi-h ^h ,— — , . »h 



: .„ re s ™ S «T, 3 



-^>y i?^^ = 



6g"E ^*S, 






p. 

■< 

H 

o 

z 

a 

z 



5 



J3 



: o : o 

:~ i"o 

•x ..= 

*- • +j . *j 

<3 • ee . cj 

O sO CO 

gj gj = 

o c o c c 



d 

S3 

.|s 

'==1 

<3S 



£ cO 

" * bo - 

£ c 3 



BO 






■2ts 

-li 



:Sg = = 
■fel ^ 



§ £>'a 3 = 
"2 ="3. = g. o 



SOD y}<>-r.<T.'£^-JJ 



2.3 3 S C---3 >.st:5 
-* C 5 c 5 



gSi 



HO.' 



" 7 « 



3 S O <^ !^ 



= 



o = , 



003 



4 si 

33 P< 



^^ -Si" 

aj d 3 



ffia: 



I : 

■ w iip 

S es ear); 

hOOO 



>0 






.2i 



I 






O-s 



aai 






111! 



- . ". 3-J 






-- w w » 4) » 

= 5uS ..•agtfl 

A -r* • BDu'T fe a .i fl? j* 



"S° 






fS£ 



=7 5 5 £ S £ ' 



- =.~- s S.SA 



pajOooOaDORhQBSShOfcriiaoOOiJOH; 



- f 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



179 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



©©©©ope 

5 O © © © © c _ 



A9)aO:OHHHHff4C)MC4COn^)OQHaAH 

o-- cr. cr. o>a»oooooooc — - p — x x cr. os c 
x ooooooooroosffiCT 5 — — os r- ~ cr. cr. x x x x o-. 

?1N r-l N N 

cr. gs &. os r.HH^H?i:iiM:ir.r:-ti- ^HftftH 

S&aa$oooedooooooo«GQssS 
x x x x x ~ — — . — os os os — r- — - r: x x x x o-. 

GC* CO iH i"* iH ** i-T ' ""* -'?!-' -'--' - H*C N i- f' f H C*. 
CN CM y-4 CM r-lOl CM 

<1 tt Q <-- -x'*<^-a^ -/. ^<!^2<hQ 

"*~© - t f x t w r. c i - r ,- .- so t-- -r x co o-i i-* to 
to 2a to so EC to w 1~- lO t'. t - t- e~ t~ t~ t- r— ro *r to t- to 
x 35 oo oo oo ac aoooaooooocooDooaoaoooooabaooooo 



> £ >x s\£». 









KM 



*f :fi 



si 






Sfe.a »j 



3«< 



_-£« 



SB 



O* 



§6- 



5 &o-< 



— r 3 o 3 ---2.- x t. ~ — .o — *r! «jd~ -■- 



si 

= 3 tfS-s 

» 3 



34—124 



180 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



)OQOOOOOOOQQOOOOOOQOC _ 

i ^ « i - c x ~ x x . - — r - i>- 1-- t-- 1^ t- t^ \z --z. eo — -.= .r. re tt 2 t-~ E S E <-~ 5 2 cccact 



; c = p o c a ; 

'9QOOQQC 





z 




— 

- 


J. 

- 


e 


- 


a 


- 






a 




■-■ 


_ 
< 












- 






- 


S 


/. 


z 


s^= 




- 


■^ 






— 



aHHeoeoamia^aoaocosHC = — — ^h ^cowcc r ?i :i r; - L -: *.- x x x x c~. — — — — i a 
n e s - x x ~ x c * — . — ■— i - c c — ^ r e ~ ~ . c C x x ~ t. 3 : ~ ~ : r. t. z~. 3 : 3> — o c c x 
x c~.ct.-j: x — x 35 x x r-. x x x — — r. a — x x z-. — x x x x x x x x x x x x ~ r. — - x 






O G ~ S -i - ^ 

» 3 5 — 3 i — . 






S« 



r: ~ — t- M 3>rH »« CO05 c X t- — ->s — re — ■ —. ■—. - y. ■— r II - :i -r C l". j. X X X C — — --I *-t —j 

t-_ moffirf -r r* -r — . -r — . — •- i_ — : X ~. X — C: •" X X — . t v 3a 35 — . 35 — 1 as — 3; 3r . -r — — es , t~* -*- 



Deo. Vl 
June 2. r i 
Jan. 22 




t 


•_' 




d 


l- r^ — X — 
« :r lo -r 
x x x x x 


ut is Sa t^ in 

X X X X X 



H T) ~l - l 



r^jr.-— . — — -h — ^_~-tf5_ 






: o -t x r^ 1— 1 ~. — t. :■*. EC .* 3S t-Q eo CN 
■ -r -i" ■- *~ xz -r -- -r — -r *rt c -r — • ( - ir: 
:xxa xxxxxxxxxxxxx 



= r. - 
io cot 
x x : 



« to cooes 

) 00 00 00 00 



ED 00 CO Q 6Q 

t-* O *S ■» '^ , 
X X X X X 



r: — ?i ri — . — ?i — — m ti — — — c: — - 1 — m -ra ?j cNi-hcn •— 

'i _*JJ> S>> . £?45 c'ft a fe'E g'C fe»g tc >>T bc^' -:'C i_>> _ 2^^^'i.j:'^ !x^ ii*; 
J5 = o © 3 O -3u5 a =^ — ^3 — £ 5=^5— =;=— H~"J- » a ~ — ~ r- = — = = tj = 



o 



as 

x 
Gil 

= 

OS 

o 

Q 






s 3 S « 3 E 



— 






— 









c . 


S : 






<3 c; 










5*c 






a^ 


c 


- =j= 




— "^ 


s 


:•?■§ 


... -. - 



"•- 



S - p2 






.3 - 

. . — *J 



£ s E q 






S 



; B 
a 



1 a 



MA 



Catholto chaplain 

1. *<■ 




•- 

- 

c 

D 

; 
-J 


• 
C 

' -T 
" r 

z 


- 

i 

- 

\ 




Z 

49 


. 




LIST OF OFFICERS 



181 



SESSIONAL. PAPER No. 34 



© © o © © o © 
© © © oc os © oa 



^H^p-H-hX 



?fl -^" i-i ^r co co -r 
©©©©©©© 
© © © x © © © 



i5 °£ °. -2 °o -* w 
xaoxaxx x 

»fif ©" ac" ci" c<f ifiT ©* 
■*T > e > ti >» 




§ 



■?■« = = 3 S 

- = >~ " * 35 

sssassf 

J-S^J = = < 



2 

s 

i 

c 



182 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



fi&l 



3S 

■a! 



us ® 



5 

(8 



B 

: 



si 



= :=::=— '^o— — o — = — :^ = — — — — — — - — — — — — — — — 



1? £ = £ £ -2 Z. 1 ~ 2 T Z- >Z> Z '2 C- C- I, 1 S3 V -2 -2 -2 Z " r ~ ~ 2* 2 _% £ £ 

« ■§ '■=-'-> j bS. & § -' ■£■ -o a - ^ 5> ^ > ^ 

Oag S-.SZ O ^xS~ S ^C-repS O £<< 

— — — s_ i- *,r i* :t :i r. - :i - :i r. r. :i m :i ^ ^ " - t - -r - -r - »~ ." 
t-:r. or: cxxxoo— ~ cocc. ee = ec~ r c; = r> o o o © o 
x x — x ~ x x x — — x x — — » x os a 55 r; — — — — — en c~- 03 — — — - 



HVSH53H-S0*«" H -0H e 






- — ~ .- 

:*= — — 



5 tt_>-- 
-<4 



jjjj^j r |-rJ4- 



c ^< 



(>. x — 

r: .s :r 
x x x 



?i e ce 
:t t- .- 



?:5 

X X 



•- -t- •. 
X X : 



- -^ <r. :*: — r^ -^ ~ ~ z 
: ••£ t~ t~~ ^ r- -s i^ ■— t 
;xxxxxxxx: 



: x x 



o g 

l- X 
X X 



o m 

X X 



t- * sj » w n ef x* 9~ n eft t£ oa x' ^ x' £ ..-' io E» §£ S3 §£ «S 2 xT * : g( gj <* 3] 



rt 6 
1x~ 



oO 



J=rS -ZC-- 



3 



■CO 
:^ c 

3 C 



"2 ' 



a S a 



SO; 

8 «j 






* Q o i> o 
"& = 9 •£ e»S 

X _ z /. — 

£ 5 j= £^ 



i.2 



o.SO 
JO'S c 



oO 

IS 
~ e 

-= 9 
02i 



5 



= 1 
5" a 



y i 






S'i 



a -5 o o g 



■a-s 8 s§ g-s — - = I § S.&"E 

^ZZ — — r.~ — v.'- — f. *;, '■*■ \^Z 



>:.:...: : : : : : 



'4. 



- 



:- 






«.S( 



- 



Is 






s 

rf'i 



=i 



S3 
I a. 
j: c 
J. 

BOS 



: o_ 



ii. 



3 o.S 

EC5 



St s.g tti 

& H 55 DS S "J -t' < X Z '£ 'i < -: a ^' « 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



183 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



OaOOOOOOOOQOQOOOOOOOOOQQOQQOQO 
OOOOOO O O ~' © o .- C C C C C — O © O © © © © © © © O O 

g 4-- x x © T) cc x x © i - »^- t~ t~ i~ t-- © •© © © © © © © © © © © © © 



c g 

' - - 



(5S 



z 
a; 

5u, 



s 
O 



5 



a i. 



3 s 



© © — ^ ~ © ~ m .r. ci K;i-:iM^o?i5:*MTr-dHH^ir> 
aaooscr.r.r. e X-- r. crc-CN © — © ~ - ?.5>coog 
x x r. r. X x x x x ©. x x x © © © x ©. x x x x x x x x — © © © 



i — ' — ' — ' x' — — ! ©' — ' ~ ©' x"n-h" 

N ft w — 



>"'= 5-s .-' &•- 
: -J; 5 = -^ o 



«S — ' — * — ' i-l — " — ' ri — ' — ' — * x' — i — i ©" — ' =' o» x" ; > 

— N ft N — 

— ..-*-- — -r "r * - ^* -*- -/- ■ ^ -* — -^- *- — — - -» -" * .^ — . 



xiKosa:ooooooo6oooooodoo5vX)Os*TOaOcoooco<»ooooQOOoa»353j9: 

n ci i— ci ^ — Ti «-( m *-« w *- 

a ~ :-dfl„rt;afi3 ™^ £.3 0.- = — cs 



:Z' 1 : 



u = 3 « 3 Ti 



z^4_c ~. § £ " ^j<< <■? ^SS<^ 



££ 



o 



o 

.— <-©©©© — '-^ 3c^*os:^oapciC4coocicsn^Ob> <~ *j* o 

X X X X X X x X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 



^ > -.= t = b -'©:•- ^iijyb^s i'Efo.j b-= . £©r-f_ir 



^ — r 



s -- 



i-K 






- £ c c c 

- O co Q S a) 



- - ■-. 



e8- 
O. 



- J C c O JO 



O.S 

Vo 2 



•O SOoo 






: x = ; 



&■ _ — _ ■ -■ - 



5 OK 



.'Ed 

£ = 



t8 



s 

5, 

,gja 

s « 

- "■£ 
-: s.s 



k 



Z ' 

: S.S 






g,jtrs 









a S 3 8 s-o So.- S^ -j< § fe 2 "E 
»2J S oSS.2-s.c- 3T = 3 8 = 



^ =71 

: bfe 






> > 



5 =- 
S E- 



B 



2 > - 
ai5 i 



§ ■ 



&S-S9 



co 



?'^ :=o 









£.iS= !%_.-« 



■op 



E^ 



hi* (B« 



. o 
-. -: 



->-•- 



<-:-:'-.— — 



.^H^aial 






ijpq 



I 



X 






B 

- 

i 

1 
- 



s 

Be 

X 

O 

JS 

I 

B 

I 



6-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX M 



FARM REPORTS 



185 



186 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



a 
g 

■1 



8 



H 
1-3 



a 
- 



- 



5 

a 



a, 

a 

u 

I 

o 

s 
■8 

CO 

'E 
. 9 

3 

o 

-Q 
S3 
Hi 

13 
si 



s 





s 
> 

£3 
at 

1 

I 



o 

H 

a 

I 

CO 



<3 



ci « <- c ■; r: t« is c i- o n o c o 
?i « © © m -r n :i x s c: i-*: ;m 

— Mi— CN t- 



© © © © © ^- ' -© © © •-••=© ^- © © 



© © © © o © © ~ 



-©©©©© io ** 



-•MO CJ ~-i^x_«:C ©Htw*aO X -r - ■;©■ 
t - © :C © ;:•= X r. 1-1 1- b- ?-. — _ : ~- 
^ © ^t« — p '" ■ Q ~r. -r -r © ^-© 
w _r ,-ri-i €0 _r-j ^o .-r_r © _r 



W*CC © 4J3 -ti-H -C»© © W rt.-© -*-rr =«oe-= 
© iQ © t>. — 03 Ci © *T -=*<= 

»-~ M — i i-t © © 3C 






J3 • J3 • J3 3 • -C x' • -C 
x x x 5 a - J x if « x 

3-23-0= :^3-0 3 ^ =3 



K 






.3 E 



5 9 «f.5 = 



J-X PP ODO — Sh 



— - 5 

« — 

■m-2'3 

t- -- t- 

C— 3 



1* 

ee 3 

3 i 

o 1- 



■- 



a) oj k i_ > _2 ^ 

8-S|Jp2g8rf.|a 

iX'iSe3Ce8Cieo — o 



■ — 

.2-ft . 

3 3 * H 



HQOOQOQQQHQOOQSaH^tCCOiQQOAQiOOQQ 

XHCCWC^OCOONt-ONi.'tiOTH'T^X'-CSO'.OOO 

-* » 1-1 © ai © 1, ^-(0^-•©1-l^-^-ll^^co©t-©^-1-"t>■t-.^ , ©©©©© 

t- — M IM — t^CN© Q0 rH CO 99 rl ^h— fc- O OOQQ 



5 



5 



2 — 



a 

•c 



■ffS 

SB*' 



Dfl 



its J 



U 



Iff 



II 
fa 

Adjd 



>- 9 
MM 



— — - 






s. 

■o 
s 

a 
S: 

■2. :L|x 
£ S-SJ - — - 

fill' '-fill 

s-. s-. X r. r. s. E- 



S.-S ass 

£"H 50— » 
T- _ 
S P t* C h 



3 o 
m'> g 






FARM REPORTS 



187 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



ec w n : © t^- x 

— — :: T — 
00 t- 






£« 



oo 

I 

a 



— = 









X 






0) 


• 3 




• — 


- 


. 5 





' h 



: s 



8.8 s 
c l ; 



& 


.2 


lT 


- 


r , 


a 






--. 


it 


* 


JA 














- 


t/lx 



oa 



£ 



188 



DEPARTHEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
Quantity and Value of Farm Products. 



Description. 


Quantity. 


Rate. 


Amount! 








Sets. 


•5 cts. 


Hay 


Tons. 


135 


5 35 


722 25 




„ 


59 


4 00 


236 00 


Oats 


Bushl. 


2,840 


40 


1,136 00 






1,050 


55 


577 50 




Bags. 


9 


66 


5 94 






500 


34J 


172 50 




Lb s . 


1,665 


02 


33 10 




Bushl . 


2 


50 


1 00 


Cabbages 


Lbs. 


33,431 


A 


265 76 




Doz. 


56 


41i 


23 10 






9 


0c 


45 






4,090 


OOi 


20 45 







5 


25 


1 25 




493 


38 


187 34 







295*|, 


1 03* 


304 92 






1,483 


03i 
01 


47 39 


„ 


Lbs. 


2,510 


25 10 


Parsnips 


Bushl. 


52J 


40 


21 07 


Potatoes 




987 


66J 


653 39 




Lbs. 


26,665 


ooemi 


1,784 15 


ii live 


„ 


11,690 


06pV 5 ] fc 


751 51 




,, 


1,438 


7 19 


ii 




2 


03 


06 




Bushl. 


220* 


36£ 


79 80 


,i 


Plants. 


6 


05 


30 




Bushl. 


800 


21 


168 00 


Mangolds 




900 


12J 


112 50 


Total . . . 








7.33S 02 











J. A. McCAUGHERTY, 

Farm Inst. 



FARM REPORTS 



189 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



ST. VINCENT DE PAUL. 
General Statement. 



Dr. 

Stock on hand June 30, 1904 

Farm seeds, manure, implements, pips, 

feeding, &c 

Shop work for stables, farm and piggery 
Stable forage, wagons, harness, horses, 

&c 

Convict labour for — 

Farm, 4,947* days at 30c 

Stables, 1,273? .. 30c 

Piggery, l,390f ., 30c 

Instructor's salary, 9 months 

Teamster's salary 

Kitchen refuse to piggery 



$ Cts. 



2,928 64 



1,916 26 
517 15 


1,419 75 


1,484 25 
382 13 
417 22 
524 97 
500 00 
104 10 



10,194 47 



Ce. 
f Produce to Institution. 



Potatoes, 1,095 bags at 50c. .8 
Turnips, 215 bdles. at 2c.... 

93* bush 

Beets, 40 bd'les. at 2c 

.. 1 bush 

Scallions, 160 bdles. at 2c. . . 

Carrots, 225 bdles. at 2c 

74 bush, at 25c 

Onions, 437 bdles. at 2c. ... 

Leeks, 165 bdles. at 2c 

Cabbage, 2,637 heads at 2c. . 

Pork, 33,467 lbs. at 7c 2, 

Potatoes to bakery, 77 bags 

at 50c 

Straw for ice-house, 1 load. . 



54 



50 

4 30 

23 39 

B0 

25 

3 20 

4 50 
18 50 

8 74 

3 30 

52 74 

342 69 

38 50 
25 



Customs sales, hay, &c 

Manure to different departments 

Horse labour to different departments. 

3,410 days at 80c 

Convicts' labour to different depart 

ments, 1,516J days at 30c 

Stock on hand, June 30, 1905 

Balance 



S cts. 



3.048 66 

139 68 

4 15 

2,728 00 

454 95 

2.132 05 

1.686 98 

10,194 47 



Farm Produce. 



Straw, 77 j tons 

Hay. 1J tons at 39 

Decayed potatoes, 1* tons at S3. 
Buckwheat, 19 bushels at 48c . . . 
ii 66 bushels at 40c . . 

Oats. 4 bushels at 40c 

Barley. 151 bushels at 54c 

Pease, 41 bushels at 60c 
Turnips, 110 bushels at 5c . 
Cabbage, 2,088 heads at 2c 



Farm Produce to Piggt rij. 



Fa mi Produce tnStable. 

Oats, 1,245 bushels at 40c . 

Hay, H2 tons at .39 

Straw, 13j tons at 34.70 



I 

365 41 
15 75 

4 50 
9 12 

26 40 

1 60 

81 54 

24 60 

5 50 
41 76 



Supplied to Institution. 



Pork, 33,467 lbs. at 7c 

Potatoes to steward, 1,095 bags at 50c. 
.. to bakery, 77 bags at 50c. .. . 

Turnips, 215 Idles, at 2c 

93*. bushels 

Beets, 40 bushels at 2c 

.. 1 bushel 

Scallions, 160 bdles. at 2c 

Carrots, 225 bdles. at 2c 

74 bushels at 25c 

Onions, 437 bdles. at 2c 

Leeks, 166 bdles. at 2c 

Cabbage^, 2,637 heads at 2c 

Straw for ice-house, 1 load 



576 18 



498 00 

738 00 

64 62 



Total of farm produce 



1,300 62 



2.342 69 

547 50 

38 50 

4 30 

23 39 

80 

25 

3 'J" 

4 B0 
18 50 

5 71 
3 30 

52 74 
25 

4.925 46 



190 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



DOECHESTEK. 



Dorchester, Sept. 11, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report of the operations 
upon the farm for the year ended June 30, 1905. 

The season was so dry, that garden stuff, mangolds and carrots, were very back- 
ward and turned out a light crop. Turnips, potatoes, grain and hay were a fair crop 
and well saved. We had a dry autumn, winter setting in early, which caused 
pasturage to be short, and made early feeding a necessity. The following shows the 
quantity and value of the farm products : — 

268 tons English hay at $8 8 2,144 



barley at 60c 
buckwheat at 50c . 
turnips at at 20c . . 



57 n broadleaf hay at $5 . 

1,440 bushels oats at 48c. 

299 

41 

5,000 

:; :,i ii i 

125 

300 

150 

60 

125 



285 

691 

178 

20 50 

1,000 00 



00 
00 
20 

80 



potatoes at 30c 1,050 00 



white carrots at 30c 
mangolds at 25c . . 
red carrots at 30c . 
red beets at 30c . . 
pumpkins at 10c. . 

378 lbs. onions at 2£c 

514 heads of cabbage at 3c. . . . 

11,720 lbs. beef 

2,588 I. beef 

8,139 ti pork 

Milk 



37 

75 

45 

18 

12 
9 

15 
700 85 
155 88 
488 34 
166 17 



50 
00 
00 
00 
50 
45 
42 



I 7,093 61 

We have on hand 141 head of cattle and 12 horses. Our stock of pigs number 40. 
Ninety-seven acres are in grain and root crops. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. T. HICKS, 

Farm Instructor. 



FARM REPORTS 



191 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Farm Statement. 



De. 

To Btockon hand July 1, 1904 

Kitchen refuse for piggery . 

Seeds, garden and field 

Windsor disc harrow 

Harness repairs.. 

Blacksmith account 

Carpenter's n 

Machinist .. 

Tailor shop 

400 lbs. binder twine. 10|c. per lb 
1.000 bush, oats at 53Ac. per bush. 

Straw 

Hay 

Wire fence stock 

Convict labour, 7,713 d. at 30c 

2 guards, S500 each 

Instructors' salary .. 

Sundries from store .... 



S cts. 

9,400 16 

96 00 

285 09 

28 00 

37 34 

227 43 

73 35 

7 75 

4 60 

42 00 

535 00 

13 95 

114 75 

177 08 

2,313 90 

1,000 00 

700 00 

294 83 



15,351 23 



Cr. 

By farm products supplied prison — 
11,720 lbs. beef . .. 

8,139 lbs. pork 

Vegetables 

Milk, 2,984 qts 

5 tons straw for prison beds .... 
Farm products supplied staff — 

2,588 lbs. beef 

Vegetables 

Milk 

Farm produce supplied sundry 
customers — 

58 small pigs 

Boar service 

1 small bull 

Bull service 

1,269 lbs. hides at 5ic 

120 cords of wood at" 82 

25 cords of rough wood at $1 . . . 
108,000 ft. timber hauled . 
Hauling 1,271 97 tons soft coal 

at 23c 

Hauling 6 1 tons hard coal at 30c. 

per ton 

2 prs. oxen, 307 d. at 60c. per d. 

6 horses, 307 d. at 80c. per d . . 
5 convict teamsters, 307 d. at 

30c, per d 

1 messenger's horse,365 d. at 75c 

per d 

Stock on hand June 30, 1905. . . 
Lalance 



700 85 

488 34 

426 61 

89 52 

20 00 

155 88 
54 90 
76 65 



151 00 

1 50 

32 00 

5 00 

69 80 

240 00 

25 00 

162 00 

292 55 

19 20 

368 40 

1,473 60 

460 50 

273 75 

9,314 38 

449 80 



15,351 23 



A. T. HICKS, 

Farm Instructor. 



192. 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



MANITOBA. 

Manitoba Penitentiary, July 6, 1905. 
Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I beg to submit my annual statement for the rear ending June 30, 1905. 

The farm produced the following : — Oats and barley, 6,473 bush. : wheat, 600 
bush.: potatoes, 1,500 bush. ; turnips, 400 bush. ; carrots, 30 bush. ; beets, "20 bush. ; 
onions, 10 bush. : cabbage, 7,000 lbs. The onions were a failure, maggots destroying 
them. 

Seeding commenced the end of April. The land was in fine shape for a few days, 
then we had a snow storm, after that it was a few days work, then a few days rain, 
until about June 28. We have not had any rain since, the longest period of dry 
weather since seeding began. 

Our crops are looking well, with the exception of some low spots, and as for the 
potatoes, it has been too cold and wet for them, a quantity of the seed rotting in the 
ground. 

I am, sirs, your obedient servant, 

W. R. GRAHAME, 

Farm Instructor. 



Farm Balance Sheet, June 30, 1905. 



Dr. 



To stock on hand July 1, 1904 
Blacksmith- 
Horseshoeing 

Repairs 



cts. 



Engineer — 

Repairs .... 
Carpenter— 

Bob-sleighs 
Repairs 



Shoemaker- 
Repairs 

Accountant — 
Charges on car wheat.. . 

Express and freight 

Horseshoeing in Win'ip'g 

Storekeeper — 
Supplies and repairs .... 

Bran 

1 pair bob-sleighs 

Auctioneer's Bervioes . . . 
Garden and Held seeds. . 
Vefry services, 5 calls.. 

Poplar 

Tamarack 

1 disc gang plough 

1 team horses 

1 set harness 

1 grain grinder ... 
400 lbs. bdr. twine at LI 
300 .. i, 12J. 



7!) 24 
15 01 



26 84 

57 84 



4 44 

38 ''.'.' 
1 00 



S cts. 
8,087 80 

94 25 

3 81 

84 68 
8 73 

44 13 



55 2: l 
Hi SO 

31 no 
:> SB 

43 83 
30 00 
11 10 
17 21 
80 00 
47.". iki 
37 '«> 
15 («> 
42 00 
37 50 



•-»_'7 32 



Cr. 

Bv Steward — 

846A gall, milk at 20c... . 
1,237 bush, potatoes at 30c. 
214 ii turnips at 15c. 

4,640 lbs. pork at 6c 

349J .. i, Sc 

560 ., green vegetables 

at ^c 

6,045 lbs. cabbage at Jo. . . 

94, bush, onions at 60c 

25 ii carrots at 30c 

8 i. beets at 30c I 

3,309 lbs. beef at $5.89 

per cwt 

1,405 lbs. beef at 8c. per lb. 
4,150 sauerkraut at lc. I 

Storekeeper (Custom) — 
7 bush, potatoes at 40c. . 
74 ,. ., 60c.. 

35 .f 50c.. 

83 ii oats at 45c .... 
8201 bush. oa ts at 40c... 
174 " barley at 45c. 
2705 ii ii 40c. 

2,813 lbs. pork at 7i 
"i,7O0 ., hugs .it 5Jo. . . 

9,78 5c. .. 

614 bush, wheat at 87}e 
409 galls, milk at 20c 
1.112 lbs. cabbage at jp, . 
293 lbs. bides at BJo, . 

41 5Jc 

Teaming 

Tongues and hearts . . 
Grinding 



8 cts. 



169 30 
371 10 

32 10 
278 40 

27 98 

2 80 
30 22 
5 70 
7 50 
2 40 

194 90 

112 40 

41 50 



cts. 



2 80 

44 40 

17 50 

37 35 

328 20 

7 

108 30 

196 91 

299 u 

489 00 

535 72 

81 80 

5 56 

15 33 

2 25 

36 79 

4 00 

98 



1,276 30 



FARM REPORTS 



193 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Faem Balance Sheet — Continued. 



and 



Dr. 

To threshing — 

0.473 bush, oats 
barley at 2icts . . 

600 bush, wheat at 3ct 

1 Yorkshire boar 

1 Berkshire boar 

Steward — 

1 br). salt 

Convict Labour — 

4,757 days at 30c 

Farm instructor's salary. 

Balance to profit and loss 



§ cts. 



161 83 
18 00 



S cts. 



17!' S3 
13 00 
10 00 

3 50 

1,427 10 

700 00 

1,984 81 



13,568 96 



Cr. 

By Storekeeper (Custom) — 
3 bush, turnips at 15c . . 
8i bush, beets at 30c. . . 
4h bush, carrots at 30c . 

5 bull service at SI 

3 boar service at 75c. . . . 

f load straw at SI 

775 lbs. hay at $16 

50 lbs. flax at 2c 

fi yds. sand at 25c 

Hospital — 

25 lbs. flax at 2c 

Engineer — 

50 lbs. tallow at 7c 

Storekeeper — 

1 ton hay for icehouse at $4 

140 cedar posts at 15c . . 

Police — 

218 days patrol horse at 75c 
Sundry Departments — 

1160 days team at SI. 50 . 

1,310 days convict labour 
at 30c 



2 condemned horses sold. 
Inventory, June 30, 1905 



S cts. 



45 
2 55 

1 35 

5 00 

2 25 

75 

6 20 

1 00 
1 50 



4 00 
21 00 



1,440 00 
393 20 



cts. 



2,234 96 
50 
3 50 



25 00 
163 50 



1,833 20 
107 00 

7,925 00 



13,568 90 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to herewith submit my report for the year ending June 
30, 1905. 

A review of the work of the past year is very satisfactory. 

The weather was favourable for all crops, and the harvest in the particular branches 
was splendid. Special mention may be made of the yield of hay, which was exception- 
ally heavy. 

Instead of working at land clearing during the past year, convict labour was 
devoted to the more pressing need of brick-making and erecting of the new prison build- 
ing. If the present outlook signifies, our farm will have a successful crop again this 
year. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

JNO. McNIVEN, 

Farm Instructor 



34—13 



194 



DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



Farm Statement. 



Dr. 

To stock on hand June 30, '04 
Jj Farm 

Piggery 

Stables. . 

Farm. 

To implements, &c 

Sundry seeds 

Fertilizer 

Blacksmith's accc, general 

repairs 

Carpenter's acct., general 

repairs .... 

Manure, 234 loads 

Convict labour, 2,708 days. 
Veterinary service 

Piggery. 

To piggery supplies 

Coal, 2,000 lbs 

Caldron 

Carpenter's acct., general 

repairs 

Distillery grain refuse, 48 

loads. . . 

Brewer's grains, 178 loads. 

2 Yorkshire sows 

■ 2 ii boars 

Freight on same from Ot 

tawa 

Convict labour, 439 days . 
Kitchen refuse, 12 months 

Stables. 

To stable supplies 

Oats, 24,180 lbs 

Bran, 12,000 lbs 

Drugs 

Blacksmith's acct., general 
repairs 

Carpenter's acct., general 
repairs 

Shoe shop acct., general re- 
pairs 

Veterinary service 

1 team horses . 

Convict labour, 1,5374 days 

Salary as farm instructor . 



'9 cts. 




3 86 

4 25 
33 00 

20 49 

108 00 
89 00 
35 00 
14 00 

30 25 

131 70 

30 00 



73 59 

314 34 

138 00 

3 05 

56 57 

7 61 

39 45 

9 00 

725 00 

461 25 



.? cts. 



3,531 00 



1,542 60 



499 55 



1,827 26 
700 00 

8,100 41 



Or. 

Steward, 

By potatoes, 50,476 lbs. 
Turnips, 2.074 lbs... 
Carrots, 1,869 lbs... 
Onions, 1,472 lbs. . . 
Beets, 1,787 lbs .... 
Parsnips, 1,872 lbs. . 
Cabbage, 5,549 lbs.. . 
Rhubarb, 15" lbs. . . 
Lettuce, 108 lbs . 

Leeks, 456 lbs 

Pease, 1,821 lbs . . . 

Pork, 8,888 lbs 

Milk, 171 galls 



Hospital. 
By milk, 78 1 galls 

Brickyard. 
By wood, 20 cords . . 



Swndry Customers. 



By milk, 461 galls 

Calves, 3 

Hay, 35,700 lbs 

Cabbage plants 

Use of carts 

Hauling for officers 
Use of pasture 



S cts. 



202 39 
6 91 

6 23 

7 36 

5 96 

6 23 
18 48 

75 
55 
2 2S 

27 23 
711 04 

34 20 



15 71 



Horse for messenger ser- 
vice, 365 days 

Truckage for new wing 
shops, &c 

Stock on hand, June 30, '05 

Farm 

Piggery 

Stables 



40 00 



3 cts. 



92 20 

19 20 

107 50 

40 
25 00 
13 50 

1 00 



328 50 
1,460 70 



Balance. 



968 10 

631 00 
2.762 50 



1.029 61 



15 71 



40 00 



258 80 



1,789 2i i 



4,361 60 
605 49 



8,100 41 



FARM REPORTS 195 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Farm Produce. 

Hay, 40 tons, at $10 $ 400 00 

Oats, 5 tons, at $26 130 00 

Potatoes, 50 tons, at $10 500 00 

Turnips, 46,500 lbs., at 33 Jc. per cwt 155 00 

Carrots, white, 44,000 lbs., at 33ic. per cwt 146 66 

Carrots, red, 20,600 lbs., at 33 Jc. per cwt 68 66 

Mangolds, 16,000 lbs., at 33ic. per cwt 53 33 

Beets, 3,400 lbs., at 33Jc. per cwt 11 34 

Parsnips, 5,000 lbs., at 33Jc. per cwt 16 67 

Pease, 5,500 lbs., at $1.50 per cwt 82 50 

Onions, 1,472 lbs., at 50c. per cwt 7 36 

Rhubarb, 150 lbs., at 50c. per cwt 75 

Lettuce, 108 lbs., at 50c. per cwt 55 

Leeks, 456 lbs., at 50c. per cwt 2 28 

Pork, 8,888 lbs., at $8 per cwt 711 04 

Milk, 710J gals., at 20c. per gal 112 10 

Wood, 20 cords, at $2 per cord 40 00 

Calves, 3 only 19 20 

Cabbage, 5,549 lbs., at 33Jc. per cwt 18 48 

Cabbage plants 40 

Total $ 2,506 32 



34—131 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX N 



EEGINA JAIL 



197 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



EEGINA JAIL. 

Inspectors of Pentitenitaries, 
Ottawa. 

Regdja, Sask., September 18, 1905. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to hand you herewith the annual report, together with 
the usual statistics for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. 

During the year 169 prisoners were received, comprising 7 lunatics, 35 prisoners 
awaiting trial and 127 convicts. Of the latter, fully one-half came originally to await 
trial and were removed to court several times before finally receiving sentence. Each 
time they were brought back entailed the same work practically as in the case of a new 
arrival. Then there has been as many as 12 prisoners awaiting trial in custody at 
one time, in which case it practically takes almost the whole time of one officer attend- 
ing interviews, &c. 

The daily average population was 42, being 15 more than last year. 

Considering the overcrowded state of the prison during almost all of the year, 
and the unavoidable laxity of discipline which it incurs, the behaviour of the prisoners, 
with about four exceptions, was very good. 

During the past year quite a lot of work has been accomplished in connection with 
necessary alterations and additions to the accommodation. Six new cells have been 
built, making a total of forty cells which is the possible cell accommodation of the 
building. 

Up stairs the rooms once occupied by the matron and bursar and a hall-way in 
which stood the medical supplies, were made into one large dormitory in which is 
placed 12 beds. The walls were lined with sheet-iron and strapped so that they are as 
safe as it is practicable to make them, although they are not by any means such walls 
as should be in an institution of this kind. 

The floor between B. and C. corridors was taken out and a gallery built which is a 
great improvement both as regards supervision and ventilation. 

Air shafts have been built from the ceilings of A., C. and D. corridors out through 
the ridge board of the roof, and although not perfect, are quite an aid to the ventilation 
of the building. 

The drain connecting the main building with the cesspool burst in the depth of 
last winter, necessitating its excavation and replacement with new tile pipes for a 
distance of about 100 feet. 

Minor repairs to the building, &c.. were also attended to and the mechanical gang 
have been almost steadily employed all the year. 

Operations on the farm were vigorously carried on and have been very successful, 
the farm accounts showing a nice balance of $793.64 in return for the convict labour. 

We have this year in crop 12 acres roots, 38 acres wheat, 4 acres barley and 70 
acres oats, all of which promise good returns. We have during the summer broke and 
backset 35 acres and summer-fallowed 35 acres more, making 70 acres of first-class land 
available for next year. We have now 5 horses and 4 oxen, but require more horses to 
replace the oxen. The piggery is getting into shape to help reduce the cost of main- 
tenance and will in the ensuing year, it is expected, give material aid in this direction. 

The ice industry was taken up again last winter, and ice to the amount of $266.25 
was sold. This represented over one thousand loads, and considering that they had 
only hand saws to work with, meant a busy season for the ice gang. 

The -present system for disposal of sewage I consider is inadequate. For one 
thing the cesspool is altogether too small, requiring to be emptied on the adjacent land 
almost daily, the atmosphere is continually laden with the gas arising from the ground 

199 



200 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

whereon the contents have been emptied. Something should be done in this connec- 
tion at an early date. 

The present stable is not fit for the stock we have now, and a substantial barn with 
good loft accommodation would be much appreciated. 

For the amount of vegetables necessary to be raised now the present root house 
is too small and a first class frost proof one should be constructed with concrete walls. 
We could then carry over larger quantities of vegetables till spring when tbey would 
fetch good prices, and the proceeds from such sales would soon recoup the original ex- 
penditure. 

Something should be done to provide a chapel for the religious services. At pres- 
ent they have to be held in the corridor immediately in front of the cell doors, where 
there is so little room that the convicts have to be crowded together too much. 

A hospital for those undergoing medical treatment and during convalescence 
should also be provided as soon as possible. There is positively no accommodation for 
the sick in the building beyond the cells and I feel that for humanity's sake something 
should be done in this matter. 

Mr. W. P. Archibald, the Dominion Parole Officer, paid the institution a visit 
during the year, and it being Sunday conducted divine service, after which he inter- 
viewed several of the convicts. His visits left a good impression among the convicts, 
and I consider the department has done a good work in putting this class of work in 
the hands of a competent and experienced person, and to some extent obviating the 
necessity of amateurs interfering in this work. 

I regret I cannot record a visit from either of the Inspectors of Pentitentiaries, 
but must acknowledge their kindly help promptly given on all occasions through the 
mail and over the wire. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Tour obedient servant. 

J. G. BLACK. 

Jailer. 



Eegika, September, 1905. 

To the Inspectors of Pentitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit my report of the medical department of the 
Regina jail for the year ended June 30, 1905. 

The health of the prisoners confined in this jail during the past year has been 
quite up to the average, notwithstanding the fact that this jail has been overcrowded 
during the greater part of the year. 

The health of the officers has been good. 
A statement of the number of cases treated is appended. 
I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Tour obedient servant, 

DAVID LOW, M.D., 

Surgeon. 



REGISA JAIL REPORTS 



201 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Statement of the Number of Cases Treated. 




Appendicitis 

Abrasion of hip 

Alcoholism 

Acne 

Abscess 

Angina pectoris 

Boils 

Bruises 

Bronchitis 

Conjunctivitis 

Colic 

Constipation 

Diarrhoea 

Difficulty in swallowing 

Eczema 

Elongated iiriila 

Epistaxis 

Enlarged glands 

Erytrema 

Erysipelas 

Frequent micturition 

Feverish cold 

Frost-bite 

Fractured ribs 

Gonorrhoea 

General paralysis of insane. . . 

Gum-boil 

Gunshot wound in knee 

General debility 

Hemorrhoids 

Hernia 

Headache 



2 
2 
3 

1 
4 
6 
1 
7 
11 
5 
1 
1 
8 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
8 
7 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
9 



Hardened wax in ear 

Insanity 

Indigestion 

Iritis 

Jacksonian epilepsy 

La grippe 

Lumbago 

Mania 

Malingering 

Myopia 

Neuralgia 

Xasal catarrh 

Neuritis 

Orchitis 

Otitis 

Psoriasis 

Pleurodynia 

Rheumatism 

Syncope 

Sprain 

Syphilis 

Synovitis 

Scabies 

Toothache 

Typhoid fever 

Taenia tonsuraus. . . 

Tonsilitis 

Urethritis 

Varicocele 

Vertigo 

Vomiting 



2 

7 
5 
1 
1 
1 
24 
1 
5 
1 
5 
3 
1 
1 
3 
2 
14 
11 
1 
2 
1 
4 
3 
6 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 



Movements of Prisoners. 



— 


Lunatics. 


General 
Prisoners. 


Total. 






37 
162 

158 
6 
4 

31 


37 




7 


169 


Discharged by — 


206 
158 




6 






4 




7 


7 




175 




31 









Daily average, 42. 



202 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 









w 


_, 


o 


o 


















•98«J8.\y .{(IBQ 








i—i 


■N IM 


oa 




w ■* 




1 


TWI 


en 


3 


cq 


i— i 


N 00 


S 


o 


CO CO 


























c3 ^ 






















.5 >» 


■siBaiaj 


<c 


CO 


- 




<M CO 


- 1 








•a = 




M 






^ 












a 


■9PTS 


C^ 


N 


rH 


w 


<N <-i 


CN 




eo co 




























,_, 


© 


.. 


,_, 


O b- 


00 


CO 


CN o 






T^ ! 


-r 


~ 


CO 


— 


IQ Tj- 


B 


lO 


«-< t- 






















-u 


•sjiHns^ 


t~ 


OS 


o 


b- 


b- m 


Tf 


CO 






E-, 












































~r 


i—i 


■^ 


T 


CO CN 


Tl* 


© 


71 tO 






■»I«W 








IQ 


*«< -r 




13 


»-H 1-H 


•saurstiuaiiuaj 


»I«W 














iH 


<M 


fc- 




JO B[I13f J9q?0 












i : 




















H 














■sadeosg 


' 8 l B K 


























rt 










H 














■sq*«aa 


,a I«N 














































































W 


si 


•8I«IU8J 


*T 


CO 


CO 


<M 


** H 


H 




































t~ 


ac 




CO 


00 lC 


CO 


r« 


CC b- 


o 


■sr»K 


















u 


■8IBUWJ 




























(N 


(N ■* 




■31«M 






















-9{ttnia£ 








f-H 








oa 




























•73 












CO Cs 


CN 


N 


04 CO 




fc 


'<M*W 


















^ » 


'dpsuia^ 


ec 




-*J 


-<*• 


CO • TT 


CO 


-r 






.i_ b 




















































CO C 




CO 


ta oo 




w s 


■8JBJ5 




K 


■<* 


CO 


■* 








03 
































= 


^H C 


33 


a 


CO CO 




1 


•I«V>I 


T 


IT 


*C 


b- 


• 






•apmiaj 


o 


C£ 


a 


CO 


© t£ 


w 


o 




































4) 


N b- 




f 


■f 






' 8 l*K 


C? 


•^ 


•^ 


CO 


^J< C* 


CO 






z 






















o 










































oo 


s 


-.1[CIW.\.J 


to 


M 


> cc 


w 


■f f 


1-H 


CM 


1 • 


























d 




00 


if 


) l£ 


i 8 


CO Ci 


b- 


^-i 


CO b» 


s 

►J 


»I»W 
















ifj 


■ejviaej 


1 ° 


C 


i O 


i *r 


ift if 


) tH 


CO 














































c • 

« C 
•r- a> 


»I«IV 


8 


' 


I s 


1 £ 


co" 5 


* CO 


CO 


g | 




a 




: 




















PC 

>< 




s 


s 


: 3 


1 8 


? 5 


; ! 

! o 


© 


i i 






* 


■ 

J 

CI 




. 06 

3 00 






i 



REOiy.l JAIL REPORTS 



203 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Keglva Jail. 



Occupations — 

Bakers. 

Barbers . . 

Boiler makers . . 

Bricklayers 

Brokers 

Butchers 

Carpenters 

Cooks 

Engineers 

Farmers 

Firemen 

Grain buyers. .. . 

Grocers 

Harness makers. 

Labourers 

Lathers 

Machinists 

Merchants 

Miners 

None (Indian). . . 

Painters 

Pottery makers. . 
Prospectors .... 
Printers . . . . 

Ranchers 

Sailors 

Shoemakers 

Stonecutters .... 
Stenographers. . . 

Surveyors 

Tailors 

Teamsters 

Tinsmiths 

Waiters 




Crimes — 

Assault 

Assaulting peace officer 

Assault by threats ... 

Assault with intent to have carnal know- 

ledge 

Attempt to have carnal knowledge with 

girl under 14 

Breach of Indian Act 

Breach of labour contracts 

Carrying firearms 

t Creating a disturbance 

Drunk and disorderly 

Escape from R. X. M. P 

Forgery 

Fraud 

Housebreaking 

Indecency 

Manslaughter 

Obtaining board under false pretenses. . . . 
Obtaining goods n m .... 

Obtaining money •• •< ... 

Perjury 

Setting prairie fire 

Shopbreaking 

Stealing ride on train 

Smuggling 

Shooting cattle 

Theft... 

Trespassing 

Vagrancy 

Wilfully causing damage 

Wounding peace officer 



2 
8 
2 
2 
2 

20 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

33 
5 

22 
1 
1 

127 



20 
30 
40 
50 

i;n 
70 



30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 



Slate of Education — 

Can read and write 

" neither read nor write 
•> read only 



Ciril Condition 
Married . . . 

Single 

Widowed . . . 



Moral Habits — 
Trtal abstainers 

Temperate 

Intemperate. . . . 



Nationality — 

Austria 

Belgium 

Canada 

England 

France 

Galicia 

Germany ... . 

Ireland 

Newfoundland. 

Xorwaj* 

Prussia 

Russia 

Scotland 

Sweden 

United States.. 



Ethnologv- 
White... 
Coloured 
Indian . . 



Ages — 
Between 10 and 20 years . 



Creed — 

Baptist 

Christian 

Church of England 
Congregational .... 

Doukhobor 

Greek Catholic 

Lutheran 

Methodist 

Mormon 

Xo creed 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic . . . 



104 

21 

2 



127 



27 

92 

8 

127 



9 
92 
26 



127 



3 
2 
50 
22 
3 
1 
2 
4 
1 
2 
1 
4 
8 
1 
23 



127 



114 

1 

12 

127 



19 

4M 

42 

13 

6 

6 

1 



127 



3 
1 

22 
1 
1 
1 
6 

23 
1 
6 

24 

38 

127 



204 


DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 
Regina Jail — Continued. 


1906 





3 



Eh 





T3 

.a 
O 


Previous Commitments — 




112 

10 

4 

1 


15 days with hard labour 

3 

6n n .. 


5 

5 


Third „ 




9 






1 






1 month 

1 m with hard labour 

1 n and 14 davs 

2 ii with hard labour 

3 .. 

3 ii with hard labour 

4 ,, 

6 n 


3 




127 


21 

I 


Punishments — 

Confined to cell on bread and w 


30 
23 

2 
1 


1 

10 

2 


n n and shackled 


13 
1 


Deprivation of lamp and reading matter . 


7 

2 






6 ii ii and 10 lashes. . 

9 .. ii 

18 „ 


14 




58 


1 


/Juration of Sentences — 


1 
1 
3 
5 

1 


3 

8 


14 ., 


2 years u 


3 






15 „ 


127 







Paedons. 



Name. 


Crime. 


Place Sentenced. 


D. Smith 

R. W. Kelly 


Cattle stealing .... 


Regina. 

Calgary. 

Fort Qu'Appelle. 

Regina. 

Maple Creek. 

Regina. 




Theft 

Receiving stolen property 


C. T. Jones 



Released on Parole. 



Name. 


Crime. 


Place Sentenced. 


J. .i. Fri/.zell 




Red Deer. 


.1. Folk 

Tims. Rife 

John lVrry 


Theft 

i il'iaining board undor false pretenses 
Theft 


Regina, 

Calgary. 



REGIX \ JAIL REPORTS 



205 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Statement of Cost Per Capita. 
Average Population. 1$. 



Head of Service. 



Supplies 
on hand, 

July 1, 

1904. 



Less 
Expendi- , Prison supplies 

ture. products , Total. on hand, Xet cost. 
1904-5. used. June 30, 

1905. 



Per 
capita 
cost. 



Staff 

Maintenance of convicts. . 

Discharge expenses 

Working expenses 

Industries 

Land, buildings and equip- 
ment 

Miscellaneous 



S cts. 

5 90 

720 ill 

8 30 

86 1!' 

24 52 



$ cts. 

6,257 88 
2,656 78 
443 15 
2.163 02 
1,306 75 



S CtS. : •? CtS. 



89 !io 1.665 38 



■:■ 



935 72 14,4'.'L> 96 



106 57 



6,263 78 
::.-!>.. 96 
451 45 
2,249 51 
1,331 27 



$ cts. 

13 78 
679 44 

4 20 
73 58 

6 00 



S cts. 8 cts. 



6,250 00 
2,804 52 

447 25 

2,175 (is 
1,325 27 



1,755 28 149 22 1,606 06 



106 57 15.535 25 926 22 14,609 03 



148 81 
66 77 
10 65 
51 81 
31 55 

38 24 



Gross cost per capita. . 
Deduct for revenue. . 



S 347 83 
12 94 



Net cost per capita 8 334 89 



Farm 


Bern n ■■ . 


■$ cts. 

24 57 

271 02 

50 


$ cts. 












Casual Revenue. 


296 09 


Old boiler and fittings 


200 00 

42 75 

4 80 










L'47 56 








543 64 



206 



DEPAKTUEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Expenditure. 



Salaries. 



Jailer. 1 year 

Deputy jailer and bursar, 1 year. 

Surgeon, 1 year 

Turnkey. 1 at $600, 1 year 

2 at S500 

ii broken periods 



Uniforms. 



Boots, leather, 11 pairs. . . 

n felt, 8 pairs 

Caps, 15 pairs .... 

Gloves and mitts, 14 pairs . 

Uniforms, 14 suits 

ii trousers, 1 pair. . 

ii altering 

.1 overcoats, 3 

Serge, Si yards 

Measuring for uniforms 
Express and freight 



Rations. 



Bread, 34,794 lbs 

Beef, 6,542 lbs 

Beef shanks, 1,459| lbs . . 

Barley pot, 200 lbs 

Coffee, 515 lbs 

Christmas extras 

Oats, rolled, 6,340 lbs.... 

Potatoes, 100 bush 

Pease, split, 300 lbs 

Pepper, 25 lbs 

Rice, 25 lbs 

Sugar, 1,388 lbs 

Salt, 1,165 lbs 



Prison Clothing. 



Brogans, 72 pairs 

Caps. 3 doz 

Cotton, twilled, 5 yards 
Duffles, 4 doz. pairs . . 

Hats, 2 doz 

Leather, calf, 3 lbs . . . 
sole, 20 lbs... 

Mufflers, 2 doz 

Moccasins, 38 pairs 

Mitts, 6 doz. pairs. 
Trousers, 3 doz. pairs 

Thread, 5 lbs 

Tacks, shoe, 1 lb 

Rivets, shoe, 5 lbs 

Si H-ks. 16 doz pairs . . . 

Suspenders, 2 doz 

Shirts, Galatea, 2doz.. 
t'nilfrclothing, 7 doz.. 

Vests, 2 doz 

Freight and express. . . 






Medioine 

Malted milk, 3 bottles. 



Ditcharge Expenses. 



Discharge allowance, 47 

ii clothing, 4 suits 

.1 1 cap 

ii ii 1 pair boots 

ii .. 1 ii overshoes. 



§ cts. 
1,000 00 

S 

360 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

2,126 99 



5,886 99 



47 03 

33 92 

18 55 

31 50 

163 61 

4 38 

28 03 

30 87 

7 15 

1 00 

4 85 



370 89 



812 31 

523 36 

43 78 

7 50 

90 70 

7 20 

232 40 

84 70 

13 25 

5 25 

1 75 

69 40 

16 07 



1,907 27 



140 94 

18 21 
1 26 

12 48 
3 50 

5 00 

6 60 
8 00 

54 59 

24 72 
84 33 

5 00 

20 

1 00 
35 45 

5 00 

19 60 
57 i«i 
26 75 

25 40 



634 92 

204 44 
9 75 

749 II 

407 15 

31 50 

ii 60 

2 25 

1 66 

443 15 



Heat, and Light and Wate 

Coal, 94.1170 tons 

Coal oil, galls 717i 

Matches, box 12 



Maintenance of Buildings. 



Acid carbolic, 30 lbs 

Alabastine, 405 lbs 

Bath and fittings, 1 

Butts, 1$ doz 

Bends 

Colours, 10 lbs. 

Closet and fittings, 2 

Cement, 16 brls 

Cocks, air, 1 doz 

Carbolinum, 87 galls 

Couplings, 2 

Clav fire, 10 lbs 

Elbows, 2 

Electric tells, repairs to 

Demurrage on car 

Formaline, 40 lbs 

Fittings, sundry small 

Gasoline, 1 gall 

Hair, plasterer's, 1 bush 

Iron, 573 lbs 

Galvanized iron, 440 lbs. . . . 

White lead, 100 lbs 

Red lead, 20 lbs 

Labour, 71 hours 

Laths, 36bdls 

Lime, 31 brls 

Timber, assorted, 2,668 feet. 

Locks, desk 8 

Latches, thumb 

Xails, wire, 5 kegs 

Nails, slating, 10 lbs 

Oil. boiled, 10 galls 

raw, 5 galls 

,i machine, 5 galls 

Overflow and waste 

Plugs, 5 

Pipe, lead 14 ft 

11 soil, 51 ft 

11 fitting 

Paint, 10 galls. 

Putty. 501be 

Pump rod connector 

Rivets, 4 lbs 

Kedllcers, 1 

Soap, 674 lbs 

Soda, washing, 655 lbs. . . . 

Solder, 10 lbs 

Slab repaired 

Stove pipe and elbows 

Sand. 121 yds 

Shingles, 2 M 

Tile, vitrified 145 feet 

Tile, galvanized 3 feet. . . . 

Trap, 1 

Toilet paper, 200 peks . . . 

T. Y's 

Thimbles, 6 

Traps 

Turpentine, 2 galls. 

Freight and express 



•S cts. 

843 87 

227 16 

2 75 

1,073 78 



13 
36 
34 



1 

1 

61 

64 

1 

87 
1 


1 

4 

4 

20 

4 





22 

33 

8 

1 

39 

10 

63 

74 

1 



21 
1 
9 
4 
o 

3 
1 
3 

20 
7 

25 
2 



1 

47 
28 

-> 

3 

1 

26 
7 

50 
1 
2 

12 
8 
1 
4 
2 

13 



50 
45 
00 
80 
35 
50 
75 
00 
75 
00 
75 
50 
25 
50 
00 
00 
63 
50 
35 
92 
00 
00 
60 
00 
00 
65 
19 
20 
10 
20 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
40 
80 
66 
15 
00 
00 
75 
60 
75 
18 
55 
50 
50 
75 
25 
00 
75 
05 
75 
68 
75 
70 
25 
70 
11 



11,343 13 



REGiy.i JAIL REPORTS 



207 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Expenditure — Continued. 



Chapels, School and Library, 

Hvmn books, 3 doz 

Bibles, 3 doz 

Prayer books, 1 doz . 

Slates, 3 doz 

Slate pencils, 3 doz 

Library books, 40 vols 



Office Expenses. 

Office books 

Premiums on officers' bonds 
Stationery and printing . . . 

Postage 

Rent of post office box 

Telegrams 

Telephone, rent of 

Freight and express 



Less refund of expenditure . 



Farm. 

Brushes, horse 6 

Boar. 

Brooms, cane, 3 

Cotton bags, 4 doz 

Cabbage plants, 1,000 .... 
Examination of horses 

Grain, chopped . 

c. threshed 

Felt. 8 lbs 

Horses, 4 

Harness, 2 sets 

Harness oil, 2 qts 
Harness dressing, h doz. . . 

Hoes. 1 doz 

Plough, 1 

Breaker board. . . 

Repairs to farm implements 

Seed 

Seperator, 1 

Wagon, 1 



Prison Furnishing. 



Blankets, 98 

Cotton, 55 yds 

Linen, Forfar, 99* yds. 
Soap, shaving, 1 doz . . . 
Ticking, 164$ yds.. .. 
Freight and express.. . . 
Containers 



8 cts. 

3 00 

12 60 
5 40 
1 80 
22 

10 00 



33 02 



8 48 

8 00 

50 02 

8 00 

3 00 

15 62 

35 00 

20 17 

148 29 
3 61 

144 68 



1 50 
15 00 

2 70 
12 00 

4 50 

6 00 

15 85 

68 55 

4 80 

825 00 

66 00 

1 00 

2 00 
6 50 

23 00 

4 00 

1 25 

123 10 

45 00 

79 00 



1,306 75 



220 50 

6 88 

26 87 

90 
32 86 
17 70 

1 50 

307 2'> 



Prison Utensils and Vehicles. 



Basins, granite, 1 doz 

Brushes, kalsomine, 4 

•• whitewash, 3 . . . . 

'• paint, 2 

Bed pan, 1 

Chimneys, lamp, 5 doz. . . 

Clock, watchman's 

Combs, 2 doz 

Chain, 47i lbs 

Casting, 1. 

Handles, axe, 1 doz 

ii shovel, 14 doz . . 

Gruel dishes, 2 J doz 

Knives and forks, 1 doz. . . 

Lamp wick, 106 yds 

Drills, 2 

Carpenter's pencils, 2 doz . 
Soldering copper, 1 lb. 

Lead, black, 6 boxes 

Lamp chimneys, 6 doz. . . 

Mugs, granite, 1 doz 

Pails, 5 doz 

Oak, 6 ft 

Pots, covers, 2 

>i tea, 2 

Padlocks, 10 

Pans, sauce, 2 

.. bake, 2 

Range, 1 

set lining for 

Soap dishes, 1§ doz 

Shcvels, 1 doz 

Sleigh poles, 1 

Wirt-, brass, If lb 

Freight and express. . . 



•S cts. 



33 00 

2 20 

3 57 
1 75 
3 00 
5 70 



Buildings and Equipment. 

Beds, 6 

11 irons, 3 

Celldijors, 6 

Cedar posts, 654 

Cement, 4 brls 

Fittings, 154 lbs 

Pipe, C. I., 6,982 ft 

Lime, 6 brls 

Staples, 1 keg 

Sand, 20 yds 

Travelling expenses (architect).. 

Valve. 1 

Wire, barbed, 3,423 lbs 

Customs entries 

Freight and express 

Less, refund of expenditure 



67 

50 

65 

30 

40 

75 

90 

5 40 

3 25 

28 84 

60 
8 00 

1 50 

1 CHI 

1 30 

1 30 

145 00 

8 50 
3 33 

12 50 
1 50 
60 

9 58 

312 44 



26 75 

3 54 

254 00 

104 64 

16 00 

7 70 

288 01 

12 30 

5 50 

50 00 

4 s 60 

10 00 

133 60 

1 52 

314 61 

1,276 57 
230 83 

1,045 74 

14,492 96 



208 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Expenditure — Continued. 



Recapitulation. 

Staff. 

Salaries and retiring allow- 
ances ■? 5,886 99 

Uniforms and mess 370 89 



Maintenance of Convicts. 

Rations 1.907 67 

Clothing and medicines 749 11 



Discharge Expenses. 
Freedom suits and allowances . 



6,257 88 



2.656 78 



443 15 



Working Expenses. 

Heat, light and water S 1,073 78 

Maintenance of buildings 

and machinery ill 1 54 

Chapels, schools and library 33 02 

Office expenses . ... ... . 144 68 



Industries. 



Farm 

Prison Equipment. 

Furnishing 

Utensils and vehicles 

Land, buildings and walls. 



307 20 
312 44 

1,04.-1 74 



2.163 02 



1,306 75 



1,665 38 



L4.92 964 



1,385 

48 

417 

336 

53 

23 

446 

5 

5 

1,037 

15 

40 

50 



Bushels oats 

wheat 

potatoes. . . 

turnips. . . . 

carrots . . 

parsnips . . . 

Head cabbage 

Bushels onions 

Bags parsley 

Lbs. fresh pork .... 
Loads green wheat 

ii straw 

Sacks screenings . . . 



Farm Products. 



Rate. 



$ cts. 



Value. 



$ cts. 



35 


4S4 75 


60 


2S su 


75 


312 75 


20 


67 20 


50 


26 50 


50 


11 50 


02 


8 92 


1 00 


5 00 


1 00 


5 00 


06 


62 22 


10 00 


160 00 


75 


30 00 


25 


12 50 



1,205 14 



REGiyA JAIL RETORTS 



209 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



B 
O 

o 
o 

< 

■< 



en 

C X 



: r r - - c g 

: 5 - -r r 5 : 



t~ — O — C C I- I t~0Q 



.2 l ^ c — ,- 



35 
P -S w »o 4J o 

SS.--8.S" 
a «•= s S s-» * * 



Sj'egeSPS 



« X 3 



i^? 






» a S s w X C •" 



■§■3 
as 



S 



i JO 



L£ 



«« 

** 



DQ »" Ti Tl t— ifi — 



,5 

00 



c, c 

EC i 

H 

11 



: X « m iZ5 3 



o c 

a a 

4 r- 






jo t-M e» c* t- 






§§§ 



§§§ § = ^i 



." IC I~ O «" 



tl — <" c 



*, - « 

■ill • 






§, 



: 3 1' 

= |g 



"7 — 



5 =-— 



P.S 

It 



IJJ 



34—14 



o 



15 















— 
- 

J- 

ifi 

— »J 

— s 
: C 

-= = 

s ii 



'si =.= 



*; . o e ,2 
- | <-■-- 

-:' < Q p-s - " 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX 



PRINCE ALBERT JAIL 



34— UJ -211 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 

JAILEK'S EEPOKT 

Prince Albert, N.W.T., July 4, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit my annual report together with sundry returns 
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. 

There have been no deaths during the year. One prisoner, John Krofcenko, 
escaped last July and has not been recaptured. 

The daily average during the year was 20 - 79. The net per capita cost for the year 
is $557.92. We have had a large amount of expenditure this year in construction work, 
having purchased $3,781.33 worth of materials for the new extension which was built 
during the year. This added $187.04 to the per capita cost, being one-third of the 
total cost for the year. 

The extension that was built during the year has more than double the cell accom- 
modation of the original prison. The building is 56 feet by 34 feet, and is two stories 
high ; there are 24 ordinary cells, 2 punishment cells, 2 cells for the insane, 2 large bath- 
rooms, one each for male and female prisoners, and a chapel 16 feet by 32 feet. Four 
W.C.'s have been fitted up in connection with the bath rooms. We put cement con- 
crete one foot thick on top of the ceilings so as to make the corridors and chapel safe. 
Cement concrete was also put in between the floors and ceilings of the first floor. The 
lower floors are made of cement concrete. Each cell is well ventilated, ventilating flues 
being built in the centre walls and connected with a large shaft running through the 
roof. The building is heated by hot water and radiators connected with the system in 
the old building. The building was started on July 6 and was completed by the middle 
of April following. All the carpenter work, bricklaying, stone work, plastering, paint- 
ing, cement work and blacksmithing was done by the prisoners, under my direct super- 
vision, the only other labour employed being to set up the heating apparatus and the 
baths. In addition to the work done on the building, all the sand and stone used was 
hauled from the river by the prison team at little cost to the prison. We also furnished 
all lime used, hauling the limestone from the river and burning it in the prison limekiln. 
The cell doors and barriers were procured from the Kingston penitentiary. The build- 
ing is worth fully $15,000. The materials purchased cost $4,580, and considerable saving 
has been effected by doing the work by prison labour instead of by outside contract as 
formerly. Had we not undertaken the work our per capita cost would have been $370. 
I think that all works of this nature should be charged to capital account and not to 
the ordinary running expenses of the prison. 

The proposed hospital and work room for female prisoners, plans for which were 
received some time ago, will be gone on with as soon as possible. 

The prisoners, besides being engaged on the above mentioned works, have been em- 
ployed in gardening, farming, hauling and sawing wood, hauling and dressing stone 
(of which we have 20 cords on hand) and making necessary repairs to the buildings. 
Their conduct has been very good. 

The Salvation Army hold regular services in the prison chapel every Sabbath 
morning. Occasional services are held in the afternoons by the Rev. Father Sinnet, 
O.M.I., and by the Church of England clergyman. All prisoners are invited to attend 
these services. The Salvation Army have done good work since taking over the Sunday 
service some four years ago. A number of the convicts having been taught to see the 
error of their ways, are leading better and purer lives. 

We were favoured with a visit from Mr. E. J. Adams, architect of penitentiaries, 
who while here prepared the plans for the new wing. 

213 



214 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

Thanking you for your courteous and prompt attention to all matters referred to 
you during the past year. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Tour obedient servant. 

F. W. KERR. 

Jailer. 



SURGEON'S REPORT. 

Prince Albert, N.W.T., July 2, 1905. 
To the Inspector of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. Out. 

Sirs, — I beg to submit my report for the year ended June 30, 1905. 

Considering the large number of prisoners in the jail we have been wonderfully 
free from sickness. 

The new cells for lunatics and the punishment cells have made the handling- of 
prisoners much more satisfactory. 

I hope it will lie possible to complete the hospital accommodation in the jail this 
year, as it is urgently needed. At present the prisoners if ill can only be treated in 
their cells, which are not at all suitable for a sick person. 

Wire nettings for the jail windows are also needed, as in summer time unless the 
flies and mosquitoes are kept out the prisoners cannot sleep at night; it is impossible 
to close the windows owing to the air in the cells and corridors becoming intensely 
foul and close when they are shut. 

If the city of Prince Albert puts in the system of water works it contemplates, it 
will be advisable to have the mains tapped for the jail use, as the water supply we now 
have will likely be contaminated by sewage. 

The water closets should be better ventilated. 

I have the honour to be, sirs, 
. Tour obedient servant, 

H. A. LESTOOK REID, M.D.. 

Jail Svrgeon. 

Diseases Treated at Jail. 



I faease. 



Acute inflammatory rheumatism 

Alcoholism 

Asthma 

Backache . 

Bronchitis 

Coxa vara 

Chapped hands 

Constipation 

Dotage 

Earache 

Eczema 

Extraction of teeth 

Frostbite 

< Kngivitia 

i tanorrhaea 

I 1 1 :i lulu* . 

[njured hand 

ii shoulder 



No. of Cases. 



Disease. 



Indigestion... 

Influenaa 

Lumbago 

Lunatics 

( Sasea under inspection as to sanity but 

not found insane 

Malingering 

Muscular rheumatism 

Neuralgia 

Otitis 

Paralysis of tongue and arm 

Pharyngitis 

Ringworm 

Sprained ankle 

T' '"' cache 

Tubercular glands in neck . 

1 ricet on foot 

Wax in ears. 



No. of Cases. 



PRIXCE ALBERT JAIL 215 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

Matron's Report. 

Prince Albert. N.W.T., July 4, 1905. 
To the Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs. — I have the honour to submit my annual report for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1905. 

The following is a statement regarding the female prisoners under my charge dur- 
ing that period : — 

In custody midnight June 30. 1904 6 

Received since 8 

■ 14 

Discharged since — 

By expiration of sentence 11 

Removed to Brandon asylum 1 

— 12 

Remaining at midnight, June 30, 1905 2 

The conduct of the above prisoners has been very good. They were engaged at 
various work-, -uch as making prison bedding, also mending, scrubbing and other 
general prison work. 

I have the honour to be. sirs, • 

Your obedient servant, 

ELLEN KERR, 

Matron. 



Movements of Prisoners. 





Lunatics. 


Committed for trial 

and 
convicted prisoners. 


"3 
-** 



E- 






"3 

S 


1 

= 
S 


3 




3 




Male, 
Female. 


O 




= 

- 










21 6 


27 
77 


27 
87 






9 


1 


10 


70 


7 


114 






Discharged since — 

Sent to Brandon A sylum 

Paroled. 


6 


1 


7 


47 


11 


58 


58 

7 
3 

1 
22 

1 
1 






1 
2 




1 
2 




Insane sent to Brandon Asylum ... 


20 

1 
1 


















93 










19 


2 


21 


.... 


21 












Number of convicted prisoners received during the 








52 


7 | 59 











216 



DEFARTMEST OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 





=». 


s 




:-. 


cc 


© 


- 


- 


■»r 


^■1 
04 




s ^ 


















c > 


















< 
















bo 


§ -FJOX 


O 


x 


o 


T. 


- 


£ 


Tl 


S* 3 — • 'aitftnaj 


rt 


= 


o 


-> 


>— 


© 


CM 


fi- 


































X 


B 


■ajBjl 


n 


X 


*£ 


X 


© 


n 


s 






"l B i°X 


r; 


<© 


s 


to 


*■ 


© 


© 




















i3 -a^in^j 


y. 


^ 


^ 


X 


N 


■*■ 


*J 




H 




































■ a r»TC 




c: 


- 




a; 


© 


I-t 

X 


S " •^JBIUrl^ 


a 


o 


o 


o 


© 


- 


© 




s 


















(2 "arais 


c 


- 


CQ 


- 


© 


© 


^ 


X 




















rz ■— x 
^ = - 


•^[bumj 


s 


© 


© 


c 


© 


© 


© 










































. 








































K 




3 I«K 


° 


- 


— 


3 


— 


© 


s 






















= 

o 


x" 


•9|smaj 


= 


o 


© 


= 


© 


~ 


c 


Q 


ga 

o 




































w 


,' 3 VK 


o 


© 


o 


O 


© 


© 


^» 


30 


•afeuiajj 


° 


© 


© 


O 


c 


© 


© 




ea 




































•a 


■aiB W 


©- 


- 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


•2 S 


•ajBHid^ 


rH 


c 


« 


- 


- 


© 


-« 




s - 


















= >-. 




















= ^ •sfk 


'" H 


© 


-* 


'"' 


N 


cc 


I- 




•aieiaa^ 












l-H 


J3 
























S " J OFK 


?1 


- 


EC 


3 




© 


© 


00 


•t^°x 


s 


^ 




-r 


e*3 


t- 


X 


3 


■8(EUISJ 


— 


© 


cc 


© 


N 


r. 


X 


<H«K 


':" 


£ 


?1 


S 


— 


© 


© 


C 


00 
















00 


C 

i 


•aiBtnaj 


"" 


- 


IN 


C2 




© 




••'IKK 


- 


■M 


" 


7J 


ir. 


© 


© 


99 . 


%»|BHW^ 


= 


© 




© 


B 


©- 


t- 
























z - 








































£e 


■op K 


M 


t- 


r 


f^ 


S 


T 


I- 








1 




§ 


i 


i 


— 
* 


2 










X 

© 


1 


i 


P 


5 




5 



PRINCE ALBERT JAIL 



217 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Previous Occupation. 



— 


"3 

s 


X 

£ 

■- 


o 





x 

s 


X 

1 






3 

>• 
20 











o 



o 




3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
7 
1 
20 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Plasterer 

Tailor 


1 
1 



l 

l 
l 

i 
l 


4 




2 





5 



1 




1 




2 




1 
1 




1 
1 
1 






5 
4 


Mail carrier 


Total 




52 


7 


59 



State of Education. 



— 


X 

~5 


e 

X 







09 


_o5 

X 


"3 

43 

o 
Eh 


Able to read and write 

Unable to read and write 


45 
6 


1 

5 


46 

11 


Read only 

Total 


1 


1 


2 


52 


7 


59 



Crimes. 



Attempted escape and theft.. . . 

Assault 

Assault and wounding 

Breach ot city by-law 

Drunk 

Drunk and disorderly 

Drunk and swearing 

Drunk and incapable 

Fighting on the streets 

Forgery and uttering 

Frequenting house of ill-fame. . 

Intimidating police officer 

Keeping disorderly house and 
giving liquor to an interdicted 
l*»rson 






3 






1 


1 


3 





1 





1 


1 


5 





7 





2 





4 


II 


1 





1 i 


1 


1 





1 





1 



Liquor in possession, contrary 
to Indian Act 

Obtaining goods and money 
by false pretenses 

Refusing to support his family 

Supplying liquor to inter- 
dicted person., 

Supplying liquor to Indian. 

Swearing and disturbing the 
peace 

Threatening to kill and assault 
on police officer 

Theft.. 

Vagrancy 

Total 



2 

1 






2 

1 



2 


1 



I 

2 


1 





1 


1 

12 

5 



2 

1 


1 
14 

r, 


52 


7 


nil 



218 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Recommitments. 



Name. 



Philip Parent . . . 
David Whitford . 

Arthur Pruden . . 

Victor Lajour. . . . 
Matilda Cook . . . 
Modiste Genereaux 



J. J. O'Brien.. 



R. Thompson .... 
Kenneth McLeod. 

Joseph Anderson. 

George Pollard . . 
Josephine Smith . 
Ambroise Boyer . 
Samuel Gagne . . . 
Joseph Cowley. . . 
\Y. Musgrove. . . 



si 



2! 



Crime. 



Intimidating police officer 
Attempting escape, Battleford 

Theft 

Fighting on the street 

Drunk and incapable 

Drunk 



Where 
Sentenced. 



Duck Lake . . . 
Prince Albert. 

Battleford 

Prince Albert 

Duck Lake . . . 
Prince Albert . 



Date. 



Term. 



Breach of city by-law 
Drunk and disorderly 

Drunk and swearing 

Drunk and fighting 

Drunk and disorderly 
Swearing and disturbing. . 
Drunk and swearing. . . . 
Drunk and fighting 
Vagrancy . . 



Theft 

Vagrancy 

Refusing to support his family 
Theft 



Saskatoon 
Prince Albert 



Saskatoon . . . 



July 20, 19042 months hard labour 
Nov. 9, 1!KM|4 
A pi. 20, 1904 1 year 
Oct. 10, 1904 1 month 
.Tunel4. 1905 1 
Oct. 25, 1904 1 
Xov.lS, 1904J2 
Jan. 26, 1905:1 
Mar. 1, 1905 1 
May .\ 19031 ., or fine $7 35 
„ 27. 1905 1 „ hard labour 
Mar. 1, 190.-, 1 

, 3, 1905 1 

. 11, 1905 1 
June 5, 1905 
Mar. 20, 1905 6 

11 27, 1905 
May 5,1905 4 

„ 8, 1905 4 

„ 10, 1905 1 
June 17, 1905 1 



Punishments. 



Bread and water diet 2 

Dark cell on bread and water 15 

Total 17 



Civil Condition. 



— 


- 




"3 

1 




Male. 


Female. 


"3 




21 


7 


28 


Single 

Total 


31 


31 




52 


7 
* — 


59 



Previous Commitments. 



First Term in Prince Albert Jail. 


pre vi. ,u- Term or Terms in Dominion 
Penitentiaries or Jails. 




Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 




36 


5 


16 


2 


59 



PRIXCE ALBERT JAIL 



219 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Moral Habits. 



— 


a 


6 

■a 


Total. 




3 


9 

= 

— 


"3 




6 
5 


i 




7 
5 


Intemperate 

Total 


41 


6 


47 


52 


7 


59 



Ethnology. 















- 






_i 


g 


"3 




J2 




15 




§ 


r D 


E-> 




2 




^- 


White 

Indian 

Halfbreed9 . . 


30 


2 

1 
4 


32 
6 

20 




l 





i 


16 


Total 


52 


7 


59 



Nationality. 



— 


i" 


9 

"3 

- 

fa 


"3 







3 

"3 
S 


3 

3 




2 

35 

6 

1 - 





4 



1 


2 

39 

6 

1 

1 




l 

2 
5 




2 


1 






2 




7 




Total 






52 


7 


59 









Age. 



— 




- 
"5 

s 

fa 


"3 





s 
"3 


si 
"3 

1 
fa 


"3 




5 
16 
10 

9 



4 
2 



5 
20 
12 

9 




6 
6 


1 





20 ii 30 


60 „ 70 . 

Total 


6 






40 .. 50 . 


52 


7 


59 









Creed. 



Church of England 

Evangelistic 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Protestant 





as 




6 

"e5 


IS 

= 

fa 


1 


21 


1 


22 


I 





1 


2 


1 


3 


3 





3 


2 





2 



I 



Reformed 

Roman Catholic. 
Unitarian 

Total 



1 

21 

1 



52 



fa r- 



1 

26 

1 



.VI 



220 



DEPARTUEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Paroled. 



Name. 


Crime. 


Place. 


R. A. Knight 




Cardston, Alta. 


Charles Lange 


McLeod, .. 
Battleford, Sask 







Duration of Sentence. 



— 


s 

OS 

s 




o 





s 


Female . 


13 


14 days 

15 

21 .. 


1 

2 

1 

2 

19 

1 
6 
1 
5 







(1 


2 


1 


1 
2 
1 
2 
19 
1 
8 
1 
6 




5 
1 

3 
1 
1 
2 
1 


1 

2 
Q 

1 




6 


5 

6 


1 
5 


30 „ 


8 , 

9 


1 




2 




13 ,, : 


2 


l« „ 


1 


2 ., 15 davs .. 

3 ., 


Total 




52 


7 


59 









Insane. 



No. 


Name. 


Remarks. 


1 




Removed to Brandon Asylum by order of the Lieutenant Governor. 



Escapes. 



PRINCE ALBERT JAIL 



221 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Average population, 21. 



Per Capita Statement. 



Head of Service. 


Supplies 

on nand, 

Julvl. 

1904. 


Expendi- 
ture. 
1904-6. 


Prison 

Products 

Tsed. 


Total. 


Less 
Supplies 
on hand, 
June 30, 

1905. 


Net Cost. 


Per 

Capita 
Cost. 


Staff 

Maintenance of convicts . . 
Discharge expenses 


S cts. 
398 30 


•S cts. 

4,180 32 
1,293 99 

IU 90 


$ cts. 
83 90 


S cts. 

4,180 32 
1,776 19 

444 90 
1,236 53 

214 46 
3,985 53 


S cts. 
' 39846 


S cts. 

4,180 32 
1,377 73 

444 'M 
1,148 25 

207 12 
3,855 72 


I cts. 

I'M 06 
65 61 

21 19 


17 85 1,218 68 

9 62 204 S4 

130 47 3,855 06 




88 28 

7 34 

129 81 


54 68 
9 86 


Prison equipment 




183 60 






Total 


556 24 11,197 79 


83 90 


11,837 93 


623 89 


11,214 04 





Gross cost per capita $ 534 00 

Deduct for revenue 48 



Net cost per capita. . 



533 52 



Revenue. 



Farm 



10 00 



Expenditure. 



Salaries. 

Jailer. 3 months at 1900 ..... 225 00 
9 „ 81.000. . . 7.50 01 

976 "1 
Deputv jailer and bursar, 1 '"ear . . . . 750 00 

Surgeon, 10 months at $240.". . 200 00 
2 .. $360. . 60 00 

-I -i;n iki 

Matron, 1 year 200 00 

Turnkeys 1, 1 year 600 00 

broken periods.. . 1,205 15 



Uniforms. 



Boots, felt, 5 prs 

■ • leather, 4 prs 

Uniform s\iits, 7 

hats, 2 

service caps. 4 

Persian Iamb cap, 1 . 

hair seal, 1 

gloves, 1 pr .... . . . 

mitts, 2 prs 

trousers 1 )>r 

overcoats, 3 




Freight . 



20 70 


16 58 


S4 36 


9 IKI 


4 72 


8 00 


2 15 


2 60 


3 50 


4 09 


30 87 


3 70 


190 16 



Jitttions. 

Barley, ]iot, 100 lbs 

Beef, 3,813 lbs 

Bread, 13,402 lbs 

Christmas extras 

Fish, 200 lbs 

Molasses, 88^5 galls . . . 

Pepper, 10 lbs. 

Rolled oats, 2,640 lbs.. . 
Salt, 560 lbs 



Clothing and Medicine. 

Braces, 2 doz 

Dnffles, ldoz 

Flannelette. 16J yds 

Kersey, 4 yds 

Moccasins, 24 pairs 

Overalls, jackets, 2 doz 

n trousers, 3 doz 

11 suits. 1 doz 

Laces, leather. 2 fa gross 

Mitts, ni-Kise hide, 3 doz .... 

Uuderwear, 2 doz 

Socks, 9 doz 

Shirts galatea, 4 doz 

Drugs and medicine 

Freight and express 



Ill • I yt tlttS. 

1 lischarge allowances 



$ cts. 

5 00 

3N1 30 
402 06 

2 50 
10 00 
52 95 

3 00 
105 60 

x 411 



970 SI 



7 20 
3 15 

1 00 
1 40 
31 1" 
23 30 
42 o:i 
14 01 
5 35 
29 16 
25 20 
19 20 

3 

59 00 
13 08 

323 18 



444 90 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



Expenditure — Continued. 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



Heat, Light and Water. 

Barrels, 3 

Coal, 85746 tons 

Coal oil, 2554 f? al l s 

Matches, \ gross ... 

Slabs, 18 cords 

Freight 

Carbide, 20 drums 



Maintenance of Buildings and 

Machinery. 



Bolts, 5 doz 

Bur ket for wind mill pumps. . 

Carbolinium, 85i galls 

Candle wick, 1 ball 

Elbows, sheet steel. 1 

Generator top, 1 

Hinges, 2 pairs 

Iron, 16i lbs 

Leather, 4^ lbs 

Nails, cut, 40 lbs 

Oil, machine. 2 galls ... 

Packing asbestos, 1 ball 

Soap, 216 lbs 

Tanks, galv. iron and connections, 2 

■i large, 1 

Tallow, 5 lbs 

Washing soda, 120 lbs 

Freight 



Offict Kxpentci. 

Postage stamps 

Rent of telephone 

P.O. box 

Premium on officer's bonds 

Telegrams 

Printing and stationery 
Freight 



Farm. 

Brush, horse, 1 .... . 

Curry comb. 1 

Hr-eshoeing . 

Hay 

Seed oats, 39 bush . . . 

Singletree, 1 

Binder twine, 30 lbs. 
Wagon repairs ........ 



Trade shops. 



Bench book, 1 . . 

a .i. i 

Bits, 1 set 

Paint brushes, 7 

Blocks. 2 

Chains. 2 

Chisels, 1 set 

Compi-s. mw, 1 

Cutter wheels, 2 

Chalk 

t. lilies 

Collars lamp, 28 . 
I >r:i\\ knife, I 

l >' hi.,-. 1 pair 

Drills, 3. 

Drawing instruments, 1 set. 



$ cts. 

• 4 50 
604 00 

>: s.s 

2 00 
18 00 
30 31 
95 00 



Trade shops — Con. 



841 69 



1 85 
4 60 

so .yj 
o 10 

75 
9 00 

1 30 
1 07 

1 73 

2 10 
1 40 
30 

17 25 
46 00 
30 00 
40 
4 80 
23 74 



231 89 



7 00 
52 00 

4 00 

8 00 

16 !K1 
39 47 

17 67 



145 10 



40 

30 
13 .VI 
35 00 
23 in 

1 25 
4 80 
7 35 



86 00 



50 
70 

4 00 

5 35 
.2 7."> 
5 50 
5 50 
60 
50 



2 i «l 



Files, 2 

Grind stone, 1 

Handles, hammer, 22. ..... . 

ii chisels, 12 

axe, 8 ... 

Hammers, stone, 3 

brick, 2 

ii steel napping, 2. . 

Level, 1 

Planes, 1 set 

Rope, 394, lbs 

Steel octagon, 31 lbs 

Screws, vise, 2 

ii carpenter's bench, I . 

Soldering iron, 1 

Saws, bands. 2 

rip. 1 

ii panel, 1 

ii set, 1 

.. back, 1 

Squares try. 1 

•i steel. 1 . 

Scythe stones, 3 

Sand paper 

Sand screen wire, 19 yds 

Scoops, 2 .. 

Scoops, tinsmith's, 1 pair . . . 

Trowels, 6 

Wrenches, blacksmith's, 1 . . 
ii Stilson, 3 . . 



Furnishings. 



Cotton, 7o yds. , 
Ticking. 2s yds 



Vti i.sils and Vehicles. 

Axes, 3 

Axe mattocks, 2 

Bowls, agate, 6 

Basins, 6 

Brooms, 1 doz 

Brushes, scrubbing, 1 doz. . . . 
Brushes, whitewash. 1 doz. . . 

Cups, agate, 6 doz. ... 

Clippers, 1 pr 

1 onibs, lidoz 

Clothes wringer, 1 

Faucet, 1 

Handles. 2 

cross-cut saw, 1 pr.. 
.. pick. 6 . . 

Lamps, 1 doz 

.. chimneys, 5 doz 

Lantern globes, '. doz 

1 lates, agate, \ doz 

Tails, galvanized iron, 4. . . . 
Range ami fittings) 1 . . . . 

Razors, 2 

strop and brush. . . . 

Tanks, copper, 2 

Containers 



■? cts. 

65 

1 36 
6 10 
1 00 

3 90 

6 00 
1 70 

4 50 

1 00 
3 60 

7 90 
:, 58 

2 50 
1 25 
1 30 

3 00 
1 75 
1 50 
1 00 
1 35 

60 

1 75 
45 
50 
60 

3 00 

2 25 

5 25 

4 35 
7 50 



118 84 



10 50 
7 00 



17 50 



3 75 

2 00 

1 20 

3 00 

4 80 

3 60 
300 

90 

2 00 

3 00 

4 50 

1 25 

60 
11 40 

1 80 

5 40 

4 2,-. 

90 

1 2" 

1 80 
1.-.;. '.1;, 

3 00 

2 ."in 

8 .HI 

1 86 



220 45 



PRiyCE ALBERT JAIL 



223 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Expenditure — Concluded. 



Buildings ami Equipnu nt. 



Alabastine, 11 pckg. 

Acid, 1 bottle . 

Butts, 12f doz 

Barriers, 28 

Brick, 35 m 

Beds, 9 

Bolts, stove 

barrel 



Bolts 



closet, 1 doz 

.. tower, 8. 

Cement, star, 50 bbls 

Candle wick, 5 balls 

Customs entry 

Door fitting 

Fittings, sundry small 

Glue, 10 lbs 

Glass, 70 panes 

Gaskets, rubber, 4 . 

Hair, plasterers, 6 bush 

Hasps and staples . . . 

Ho< >ks and eyes, 3 doz 

Iron, assorted, 2,49ft lbs, 

ii galvanized, 22 

Heating system, (installed) 

Japan, black, 7 gall 

Knobs, 3 sets . . .... 

Keys, 3 

Lamp 'slack, 10 lbs 

Lead, white, 175 lbs 

Locks, prison, 28 

Lumber, assorted, 5,527 ft 

" v. joint, 300 ft 

moulding base, 400 ft . 

i. •• round 500". . 

•■ window stops, 250 
Laths, 38 bdls. . 

Lock, 1 

Latch and bolt, 1 

Latch, 1 

Lime, 04 bush . . 

Nails, shingle, 400 lbs 

.. wire, 3 kegs 

., 128 lbs 

Nuts, 15 lbs. 

Oxide, 40 lbs 

Oil, boiled, 25 galls 

Pipe, assorted 

Paint 

Putty, 37 lbs 

Points 

Padlocks, gate, 2 

Ki\ sts 

Sheeting, 2,105 ft 

Shingles, 3 M 

Sheet steel, SO lbs 



S cts. 

5 50 
40 

7 72 
450 88 
350 00 

46 02 
25 

6 00 

95 

2 40 

1 20 
100 00 

30 
25 

70 

4 20 

3 00 
20 80 

1 60 

1 80 
20 
60 

128 07 

2 20 
803 00 

12 50 
45 
2 16 
2 70 

16 00 
383 04 
119 65 

8 10 
14 00 

5 00 
2 50 
5 00 
50 
35 
40 

30 85 
19 20 

13 70 

7 35 
2 15 
2 80 

27 50 

97 63 

25 07 

2 33 

15 

1 80 
15 

38 97 
HI 511 

8 00 



Buildings and Equipment — Con. 

Solder, 4i lbs 

Screws, 21 pckgs . 

Tar paper, 9 rolls 

Turpentine, 4 galls 

Trough, down pipe and elbows for 

roof 

Union, 1 

Welding pipe 

Washers, 4 lbs. . - 

Travelling expenses (architect) 

Freight 

Total 



Recapitulation. 

Staff. 

Salaries and retiring allow- 
ances 3,990 16 

Uniforms and mess 100 16 

Maintenance of Convicts. 

Rations 970 HI 

Clothing and medicines 323 18 

Discharge Exptn^ s. 

Freedom suits and allow- 
ances 



$ cts. 



1 80 

7 05 

11 25 

6 00 

45 94 
60 

15 00 
60 

85 45 
635 88 


3,617 11 


11,197 79 



Working Bsrpi ntes. 

Heat, light and water. ' ... 841 69 
Maintenance of buildings 

and machinery 231 89 

Office expenses 145 10 

Industries. 

Farm 86 00 

Trade shops 118 84 



Prixon Equipnu nt 

Furnishing 

Utensils and vehicles 

Land, buildings and walls. 



Total. 



17 50 

220 45 

3,617 11 



4,180 32 



1,293 99 



444 90 



1,218 68 



204 S4 



3.855 06 



11,197 79 



224 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



FARM REPORT. 



Prince Albert, July 4, 1905. 
The Inspectors of Penitentiaries, 
Ottawa. 

Sirs, — I have the honour to submit my annual report with regard to the farm, for 
the year ended June 30, 1905. 

The root crop grown on the farm during the past year was good. Vegetables to 
the value of $117.15 were grown. We had an abundant supply for the prison kitchen 
during the year. 

The 12 acres under cultivation was sown to oats and a fair crop realized, th? crop 
was cut when green, and fed to the prison horses. 

This year the land has again been cropped with oats and it looks well. 
I was unable during the year to do any clearing up of brush from the farm, all 
available prison labour being utilized on the new building. The 15 acres brushed out 
and broken up could not be cropped this year, as it was not fenced in. The whole farm 
should be fenced. I would recommend that it be done at once. The portion not in crop 
would make a good pasture field for the prison team when not working. 
I have the honour to be, sirs, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. W. KERR, 

Jailer. 



Farm Statement. 




To stock on hand, July 1. 1904 as per 

inventory 

Hay, 12,000 lbs 

Repairs to wagon 

Horse shoeing . . [ 

Wagon spokes 14 at 15c . .. . 

Binder twine, 30 lbs. at 16c 

Curry comb - 

Brush 

Single tree 

Seed oats, 39 bush, at 60c i 

Surcingle. 

Harness dressing 

n oil 

• ' soap 

Garden seeds 

Horse medicines 

Veterinary aervices 

I 'nm id's labour, 51 days at 30c. . . . 
Balance, profit and loss 



603 75 
63 00 
5 25 
13 50 
2 10 
4 80 
30 

40 

1 25 
23 40 

65 

1 00 

35 

1 00 
10 04 

2 70 

3 00 
16 30 

158 61 

910 40 



By potatws, 233 bush, at 25c 

Carrots, 35 .. 40c 

Turnips, 27J .. 30c 

Beets, 14 ., 40c 

Parsnips 8f n 40c 

Cabbage. 200 lbs. at 5c 

Onions, 10 bush, at $1.75 

Allowance for u<e of prison team, 
emptying cesspool, hauling stone 
and sand for new \\ ing, ice, wood, 
coal and genera] prison work, 218 
days at 75c 

Stock on hand as per inventory, 
June 30, 1905 .. 



58 25 


14 00 


8 20 


5 86 


3 34 


10 00 


17 50 


163 50 


629 75 



910 40 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



PRIXCE ALBERT JAIL 



Officers. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Creed. 



Date 

of birth. 



Date Date of 

of first ap- present ap 
pointment. pointment. 



F.W.Kerr Jailer and bursar. . Baptist Jan. 3, 1858 May 20, 1898 Julv 1,1901 

T. S. Jones Deputy jailer Presbvterian ..Dec. 18, 1864 Nov. 3, 1903 ,. 1, 1904 

H. A. L. Reid.M.D. Surgeon Ch.of England Oct. 24, 1868 : ., 10, 1898;Nov.l0. 1898 

Ellen Kerr Matron Presbvterian. . Nov. 1, 1858 Feb. 1, 1902 Feb. 1,1902 

John McLeod Turnkey .. .. June 23, 1871 1 .. 1,1905 .. 1,1905 



Salary. 



1,000 
550 
300 
200 
600 



34—15 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



APPENDIX P 



YUKON PENITENTIARIES 



34— 15£ 227 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 A. 1906 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR. 

Dawson, Y.T., July 1, 1905. 

The Honourable the Minister of Justice, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to forward herewith my annual report as inspector of 
penitentiaries in the Yukon Territory for the year ended June 30, 1905, together with 
copies of the reports of the wardens at Dawson and White Horse, respectively. 

Both of these institutions are in charge of the Royal North-west Mounted Police; 
the commanding officers of each division act as wardens, while the surgeon and assistant 
surgeons look after the medical wants of the convicts. Non-commissioned officers and 
constables fill the positions of keepers and guards. 

There have been no material changes in either of the penitentiaries named since 
my last report. The buildings used as such are log structures erected originally as 
police guard-rooms, but now used as penitentiaries, common jails, debtors' prisons and 
lunatic asylums, in addition to the purpose for which they were first intended. Owing 
tr the limited accommodation, prisoners of all classes are under one roof and come 
into contact with one another. 

It is impossible under such conditions to properly enforce prison discipline, and, 
though I am glad to say there have been no escapes from custody, yet on two occasions 
have capias prisoners and witnesses been caught in the act of passing communications 
from convicts to their friends. 

DAWSON PENITENTIARY. 

As stated in previous reports, this building is situated on First Avenue — one of 
the principal thoroughfares of the city — and is within three feet of the Canadian Bank 
of Commerce mess house, whose windows overlook the northern corridor, and from 
which prisoners inside the institution can be seen and even conversed with. 

The danger from fire is greatly increased from the proximity of the two structures, 
both of which are heated by stoves, the pipes of which run through various compart- 
ments before entering the chimneys. Every precaution is taken against a possible 
outbreak of fire, but, were one to occur the dry logs and drier wooden partitions would 
burn like matchwood, and I am afraid loss of life among the prisoners would result. 

Owing to the fact that the building is one of the oldest in Dawson, and that the 
foundation was laid on frozen muck and ice, the floors have sunk in places, the walls 
are out of plumb and doors and windows are continually jamming. It seems a waste 
cl money to expend any more in jacking it up to its proper level, putting in new. floors 
and floor beams and changing door and window frames. Furthermore, owing to its 
location there is no space available which can be used as a prison enclosure or yard, 
and all convicts have to work in the barrack square, which is a public thoroughfare, 
and where a picket fence is the only obstacle to escape. 

Were it not for the fact it has been decided, that under present conditions, the 
government would not be justified in providing permanent buildings, I would strongly 
urge a new place of confinement be erected this summer, in accordance with plans and 
specifications I have already submitted of a building which could be used for the deten- 
tion of every class of criminal, insanfe persons, debtors and witnesses, and yet would 
enable us to keep them apart and enforce the regulations laid down for the guidance 
of those responsible for the detention of the various classes. 

229 



230 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

As the present structure must therefore be occupied and maintained as a pen'ten- 
tiary for some time longer, it is imperative that such alterations and repairs as will 
put it in a habitable condition for the coming winter, be undertaken at once, as in its 
present state, it is not only incapable of being comfortably heated, but is not even 
■weather proof. 

I would like to bring to your notice Staff-Sergt. Marshall, provost and head 
keeper of the pentitentiary and jail, to whose firmness, tact and watchfulness is due 
the good behaviour and safe keeping of the convicts during the year. 

WHITE HORSE PENITENTIARY. 

The location of this building is better than that of the Dawson structure. It is 
outside the town and is not crowded by adjoining buildings. The great trouble here 
is the want of room. There are only twelve cells and these are crowded at times, 
especially when convicts and lunatics from Dawson are detained there awaiting a 
steamer while en route to New Westminster. 

Convicts, common jail prisoners, lunatics, debtors, witnesses and Indians are all 
crowded in a room 22 x 12 with six cells at each end. All have to share the same mess 
room or living room on which the cells open. Of course, no discipline can be enforced 
where so many classes are thrown together. One capias prisoner was confined for over 
a year, and gave us considerable trouble by smuggling forbidden articles to convicts. 

A new place for the confinement of prisoners, lunatics. &c. is even more in gently 
needed here than in Dawson. Plans and specifications for a suitable structure have 
been forwarded, and I trust authority will be granted, ere long, to erect it. 

Sergeant McClelland, who is provost and head keeper, deserves great credit for the 
jafe keeping of his prisoners, as he certainly labours under many disadvantages. 
There is no prison enclosure or even fence around barracks and the international 
boundary is not far away. 

GENERAL. 

As before stated the staffs at both White Ho:se and Dawson are composed of non- 
commissioned officers and constables of the force. The head keepers and th ir assis- 
tants are permanently detailed or are changed at long intervals only. The plac.s of 
guards, however, are filled in turn daily by constables, many of whom are new to the 
work. The police in the Yukon are called upon to perform -o many extraneous duties 
that, as a rule, we are severely taxed to furnish all the men required. It becomes 
neee.-sary then to detail men for guard duty who have but lately joined, who have had 
no training, and who do not realize the responsibility devolving upon them when in 
charge of criminals. 

As I have stated the general public have free access to the barrack squares — the 
only places where the prisoners can be employed- — and it is difficult to make the young 
recruits (who have been but a short time in the country) understand that the criminal 
class which frequents every mining camp would gladly assist any convict to escape and 
give him shelter when free. The opportunities for such attempts are greater here than 
any where else, owing to short hours of daylight in winter and the fact that outdoor 
labour during this period of the year is performed in the dark, the guards carrying lan- 
terns in order to be able to see their charges. 

I would therefore request authority to detail a certain number of non-commis- 
sioned officers and constables for penitentiary duties only. Of course only experi- 
enced and tried men would bo chosen and these should receive extra pay commensurate 
with the responsible character .if the work they perform. The wardens should also be 
remunerated for the extra work devolving upon them as such. 



YUKON PENITENTIARIES 231 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

It is the boast of the force in the Yukon that no convict in their charge has over 
escaped, and of the two common jail prisoners who made the attempt, both were recap- 
tured in a few hours; it seems to me that some inducement should be held out and some 
reward given to those who are so proud of this fact, though the duties of guards and 
jailers do not strictly come within their province. 

All expenses in connection with the penitentiaries are borne by the E.N.W.M. 
Police and a refund of $2 per diem per prisoner is made by the Department of Jus- 
tice. Xo financial .-tatements are kept nor has any money been received. There are 
no outstanding debts. 

Estimates of all supplies for the ensuing year have been forwarded to the Comp- 
troller R.N.W.M. Police, Ottawa. All supplies and tools on hand are the property of 
the R.X.W.M. Police. 

The sanitary arrangements of both establishments are as good as can be provided 
in such confined limits. 

The food supplied is of good quality and sufficient in quantity. 

No complaints have been made to me during my inspections. 

The conduct of the convicts has been good. 

Several juvenile offenders, boys of from 14 to 16 years, have been before the police 
magistrates in Dawson for theft. One of them was the boy lately hung at Vancouver 
for murder. Another, a young half-breed, has been twice convicted of stealing; on 
the first occasion he was allowed to go on suspended sentence, but on being shortly 
afterwards found guilty of a second offence, was sentenced to three months imprison- 
ment with hard labour. As association with the criminals confined in the Dawson jail 
would have had a bad effect on him, the magistrate was in a quandary what to do with 
the lad. He is an orphan living with an aunt who said she could not be responsible for 
him. It was finally decided that he should serve out his sentence at Grand Forks police 
detachment, where there are no other prisoners at present. I think flogging would have 
a salutary effect in such cases — the punishment when possible to be inflicted in the jail 
by one of the parents in the presence of the jail surgeon. In the absence of. or refusal 
of either of the parents, the head keeper should be empowered to administer the 
threshing. 

I am not aware of any case of injustice or hardship arising out of the enforcement 
of the criminal law or penal system. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Z. T. WOOD, 
Assistant Commissioner, Commanding R.N.W.M. 
Police, Yukon Territory, and Inspector of Peni- 
tentiaries in the Yukon Territory 



232 BEPARTUEST OF JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
DAWSON. 
warden's report. 

* 

Dawson, T.T., July 1, 1905. 
The Inspector of Penitentiaries, 

Yukon Territory, Dawson, Y.T. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report for the year ending this date, together 
with report of the assistant surgeon and the usual statement and summary of convicts 
confined in Dawson penitentiary during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1905. 

BUILDING. 

The penitentiary is comprised within the R.N.W.M. Police guard room, which 
is also the common jail of the district, the officer commanding 'B ' Division R.N.W.M. 
Police acting as warden, ex-officio, of the penitentiary and jailer of the other depart- 
ments. 

It having been decided that a new building at this point to be utilized for the above 
mentioned department and accommodation of insane prisoners also will not be erected 
it will be necessary to make repairs to the old building. A new floor is urgently re- 
quired, and the outside walls should be placed in better condition to withstand the cold 
climate in winter. The building is extremely cold and consumed a far larger amount 
of fuel than should be necessary. 

The jail yard has been enlarged during the past year and a tool house added, and 
attempts at escape by prisoners further guarded against by the stretching of wire net- 
ting over the yard. 

CLOTHING. 

The convicts' clothing is provided principally from our stores, and is suitable and 
satisfactory. When articles not in store are required they are purehns d loc.illy. 

CONDUCT. 

The conduct of convicts during the past year has been very good, nothing more 
serious than slight breaches of discipline having been dealt with. Discipline has be n 
strict and consistently maintained. 

HEALTH. 

No serious case of illness occurred, with the exception of the case of a convict who 
was sentenced on August 1, 1904, to two (2) years P. S. for the theft of a hor.-e. 
Shortly after sentence he became partially paralyzed, and on the strength of a special 
report to the Department of Justice on hi* case he was pardoned. 

INSPECTIONS. 

The penitentiary i-: visited and inspected daily, and prisoners are asked whether 
they have any complaints; none but trivial complaints have been made, which were 
immediately investigated, r iving attention where necessary. 



YUKON PENITENTIARIES 233 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

RATIONS. 

The food supplied is of good quality and sufficient in quantity. 

STAFF. 

The immediate charge of convicts is vested in Staff-Sergt. Marshall, at present 
acting as provost; he has been most painstaking and efficient. During working hours 
he is assisted by an assistant provost, the men being detailed daily to act as prisoners' 
escorts. At night the convicts and other prisoners are turned over to the non- 
commissioned officer of the guard and night sentries. Under the circumstances this 
system is the best practicable. It could be improved upon by detailing as peruianent 
prisoners' escorts those of our men who have been long in the force and are more ex- 
perienced, but this, under present conditions is impracticable. 



WORK. 

There has been an abundance of work always available for the prisoners. It was 
all outside work winter and summer, and to this probably is due our exemption from 
illness. 

The wood yard supplies the bulk of the work, and when not employed sawing and 
splitting wood the prisoners are kept busy about the barrack enclosure in various ways. 
During the short and dark winter days there is always an element of anxiety in con- 
nection with the security of convicts and other long term prisoners, and the greatest 
care and alertness is required of the escorts constantly to prevent possible escapes, a 
prisoner out of reach of his escort has no other obstacle to his liberty, there being no 
wall surrounding the grounds. 

A supply of books for the use of prisoners is required; there is at present a very 
limited amount of reading matter in the penitentiary and jail, and nearly all of the 
books are damaged or worn out, several being incomplete. 
I have the honour to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

A. ROSS CUTHBERT, Supt., 
Commanding 'B' Division, R.N.W.M. Police, 
Warden Dawson Penitentiary. 



234 



DEPARTMEXT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

Synopsis of Convicts confined in the R.N.W.M.P. jail at Dawson, Y.T., during the 

year ending- June 30, 1905. 




Offence and Crime. 



House breaking and theft 

Theft from dwelling house 

ii of gold from sluice boxes 

ii of gold and gold dust 

ii of gold-bearing gravel and dirt 2 

ii of money 

ii of horse 



Totals 



Remarks. 





1 


1 


1 




1 




1 


2 




1 






1 


4 


5 



The above statement includes 2 pardoned, 2 time expired, leaving a balance of 5 
at present in this penitentiary. 
Certified correct. 

E. SMITH. Senit., 

Provost. 



SURGEON S REPORT. 



Dawson, Y.T., June 30, 1905. 
The Officer Commanding, 

' B ' Division, R.N.W.M. Police, 
Dawson, Y.T. 

Sir, — I have the honour to forward herewith my report on the health of the con- 
victs in this penitentiary for the year ending this date. 

During the year the total number of cases of illness was 15 ; of these 2 were placed 
in hospital, and with one exception all recovered and were returned to work. 

I <>nvict No. 35, the exception mentioned above, reported sick immediately after 
he received sentence. He was old and feeble and was placed in our hospital on 
August 8, where he remained till pardoned on November 11. 1904. when he wrs moved 
to St. Mary's hospital. He seemed to undergo a great shock after receiving his sen- 
tence which caused a paralysis of his lower limbs. 

Convict No. 34 suffered from an attack of gastritis: he was under treatment from 
October 11 to November 12, and was placed in hospital for twelve days during that 
period; he recovered and was returned to work on November 12. 

The other cases were of a simple nature requiring no special mention. 
I have the honour to be. sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

W. E. THOMPSON, 

Jail Surgeon. 



JUKOS PENITENTIARIES 



235 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 



Convict Prison Sick Report. 



Disease. 



Backache 

Biliousness 

Cold 

Debility 

Dyspepsia 

• Jastritis 

Hernia (old ) 

Lumbago 

Rash (simple) 

Toothache 

Total number of cases 



Number 

of 
Cases. 



15 



Number of 
days under 
treatment. 



9 
79 
12 

32 

1 
5 



Surgeons remarks. 



Medicine and work (recovered). 

Off work (recovered). 

ii (pardoned). 
Light work (recovered). 
Off work 

Work (fitted with a truss). 
Light work (recovered). 
Medicine and work (recovered). 

" " (tooth extracted). 



W. E. THOMPSON, 

Jail Surgeon. 



236 



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
Return of Convicts confined in the R.N. W.M.P. Jail at 



Received Name. 



Crime. 



Sentence . 



April 4, '03 Dick, .T. George. Theft from dwelling house, 2 yrs PS. 

jewellery value, $300. 



Date 

of 

Sentence . 



By whom 
Sentenced . 



Mar 4, '03 Judge Craig and 
jury. 



July 22, '03 Steinfield, Max. Housebreaking and theft of 2 yrs P.StoJuly 22, '03 Insp. Wroughton, 

clothing, value of not less date from J. P. 

than 9700. Dec. 15, '03 



Oct. 



2, '03 Sulies.John alias Theft of gold dust to value of 2 yrs P S. 
Solies . $800 on Sulphur Creek . 



July 11. 04 Lane, William. . Theft of gold and gold dust. 2 

value about $400, from 
sluice boxes on Last Chance 
Creek. 

Aug. 1, '04 Mick, George. . Theft of horse 2 



Oct. 6, '04Sarantis, George Theft of money ($1,167.60), 3 

one ^ sovereign and 1 gold 
watch from a dwelling house. 



18, '04 



Frey. Frank 



Oct. 2, 03 

July 9, '04 

Aug. 1, 04 

Oct 6, '04 

, 18, '04 



Judge Craig, no 
jury. 



Judge Craig and 
jury. 



Judge Macau lay 
and jury. 

Insp . Wroughton, 
J.P 



Judge 
(pleaded 



June 6, 



6, '05 Shaw, David R.. 



Theft of 1 U.S. Treasury 3 
note for $1,000 and $40 m 
currency 

05 Monroe, Donald 1. Theft of gold bearing gravel 3 .• ..June 6, '05 Judge 
alias DanMon- and dirt containing gold (pleaded 

roe. and gold dust. 

2. Breaking and entering a 2 yrs. PS .. 0, '05 
dwelling house by day and concurrent 
stealing therefrom . 

3. Theft of gold bearing gravel 1 year H.L. .. 6, '05 
and dirt containing gold and concurrent 
gold dust to the value of 
about $120 

4. Theft of goods, value about 3 mos. H.L. .. 6, '05 
$100 

1. Theft of gold bearing gravel 3 yrs. PS „ 6, '05 
and dirt containing gold and 
gold dust 

2. Breaking and entering a 2 yrs. PS. ti, '05 
dwelling house by day and concurrent 
stealing therefrom. 

3. TheftofgoldbearinggraM-l I year II I. 6, '05 
and dirt containing gold and] concurrent 
gold dust, value about $100. 



D u g a s 
guilty). 

Craig 
guilty). 



TVEON PENITENTIARIES 



237 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 
Dawson, Y.T., during the Year ending the 30th June, 1905. 



Read or 

write or 

both. 



Nationality 



Both Scotch 



Neither 



American 



English 



Austrian 



Both in Greek . . 

Greek, can 

only sign 

hisnamein 

English. 
Both Austrian 



Canadia n 

(N. Scotia) 



•8 



Canad ia n 
(B.C.). 



Yes. 



Yes. 



Temperate. 



Abstainer . 



Creed . 



Occupation 



Remarks. 



Hebrew 



Lutheran. 



Episcopal 



Lutheran. 



Roman Catho 
lie. 



Presbyterian. 



Clerk 



Machinist 



Labourer. 



Seaman car- 
penter and 
engineer. 

Miner, 
quartz and 
placer . 

Cook. . . . 



Labourer. 



Labourer 
and miner. 



Roman Catho- 
lic. 



Transferred to common 
jail, Oct. 25, 1904, to 
complete second sen- 
tence (6 m. hard labor) 
3 m. of which run con- 
currently Discharged 
from jail, Jan. 21, '05. 

Discharged, Aug. 5, '04. 
Telegram from Under- 
Secy. of State . 

Previously convicted of 
theft and sentenced to 
2 mos. hard labour by 
Insp. Starne, Oct. 26, 
1898. Discharged, time 
expired, June 24, 1905. 

Still serving. 



Discharged, Nov. 14, '04. 
Authority of Secre- 
tary of State . 

Still serving. 



238 DEPARTMENT Of JUSTICE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

WHITE HOESE. 

warden's report. 

White Horse, Y.T., July 1, 1905. 
The Assistant Commissioner, 

Royal Xorth-west Mounted Police, 
Dawson, Y.T. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following as my annual report as warden of 
the Guard Room Penitentiary at White Horse, for the year ended June 30, 1905. 

The building occupied as a guard room and used as a common jail and peniten- 
tiary is a log building ill suited to the requirements; too narrow to admit of the cells 
being placed other than along and attached to the outer walls; besides being so con- 
structed that it is impossible to ventilate properly without making it too cold during 
the severe cold weather in winter. The security given by this building to the safe 
keeping of prisoners is very slight, and throws the great responsibility on the provost 
and guards. 

The guard room is under the supervision of a provost sergeant, assisted by a non- 
commissioned officer or constable in charge of the night guard, who also act as jailers 
for the common jail and penitentiary. 

The common jail and penitentiary are governed by the rules and regulations as 
approved by order in council for the government of common jails and penitentiaries. 

Inspections are made daily by the orderly officer and the surgeon of the post, and 
weekly by myself as officer commanding and warden of the penitentiary. 

The conduct of the common jail and penitentiary prisoners has been good during 
the year, it only being necessary to inflict a few mild punishments to keep proper 
prison discipline. One prisoner was released during the year on the authority of Hi- 
Excellency the Governor General; this prisoner had nine months to serve on a two 
years sentence for perjury. 

I attach hereunto lists showing the number of prisoners, offences for which they 
were confined. &c, &c. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant. 

A. E. SNYDER, Supt. 

Commanding 'II' Dirision. 



Number of prisoners undergoing sentence in the Royal Xorth-west Mounted 
Police guard room at White Horse, from July 1, 1904. to June 30, 1905: — 

Male. Female. Total. 

On hand July 1, 1904 4 3 7 

Received during the year 11 . . 11 

Total 15 3 IS 

Discharged by — 

Expiration of sentence 13 3 10 

Released 1 . . 1 

• Total 14 3 IT 

Remaining on hand June 30, 1905 1 . . 1 



YUKOH I'FXITEXTIARIES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 34 

DURATION OF SENTENCE. 

Two week- with hard labour 2 

20 days with hard labour 2 

30 days with hard labour 1 

1 month with hard labour 5 

3 months with hard labour 3 

5 months with hard labour 1 

6 months with hard labour 2 

10 months with hard labour 1 

Two years with hard labour 1 

Total IS 



NATIONALITY. 

Canada 

United States 5 

England 2 

Ireland 1 

Norway j 

Sweden 1 



Total L8 



CRIilE. 

Perjury 2 

Theft 4 

Fraud 1 

Carrying concealed weapons 1 

Assault 1 

Vagrancy 2 

Supplying liquor to Indians 2 

Drunk and disorderly 5 

Total 18 



CREED. 

Roman Catholic 3 

Church of England 4 

Presbyterian 6 

Methodist 4 

Baptist 1 

Total 18 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 A. 1906 



ANNUAL REPOET 



OF 



THE MILITIA COUNCIL 



FOB THE 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1905 



PRINTED BY ORDER <>F PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER TO THE KINCSIMOST 

EXCELLENT M UKSTY 

1906 

[No. 35 — 11)06.] 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 A. 1906 



To His Excellency the Bight Honourable Sir Albert Henry George, Earl Grey, Viscount 
Howick, Baron Grey of Howich, in the County of Northumberland, in the Peerage 
of the United Kingdom and a Baronet; Knight Grand Cross of the Most Dis- 
tinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, &c, &c, Governor General 
of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency : 

The undersigned has the honour to present to Tour Excellency the Report of the 
Militia Council for the year ending- December 31, 1905, such report being that of the 
Department of Militia and Defence of the Dominion of Canada, for the period above 
stated. 



Respectfully submitted, 



F. W. BORDEX, 
Minister of Militia and Defence. 



Department of Militia and Defence, 

Ottawa, March 1, 190fi. 



3o—l.l 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 A. 1906 



INDEX 



A 

Page. 

Annual Training: Officers and men trained in camp and at local headquarters.. 15 

Appointments 2l' 

Armament 28 

Armouries 30 

Appendices : 

Annual Report of the Inspector-General 39 

" '"' Director-General of Medical Services 52 

" Commandant, Royal Military College 

Superintendent of the Dominion Arsenal 62 

c 

( 'amp Equipment 27 

" Cooking-Ranges :_'>; 

" Grounds, generally 11 

" " Levis 26 

Camps of Instruction 10 

D 

Defences, Quebec 30 

Dominion Arsenal 31 

E 

Establishments : 

Non-permanent force 22 

Permanent force 20 

Expenditure 32 

F 

Fuel 27 

I 

Instruction, generally 23 

" in England 24 

technical, at Artillery Schools 29 

Intelligence 10 

L 

Page. 

Lands sold 31 

" acquired 31 



6 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

M 

Medals and Decorations Issued 26 

Military Policy 8 

Militia Council ■ 

Musketry School 18 

o 

Organization and Military Training 8 

P 

Permanent Force, Return Showing State of 21 

R 

Eations 26 

Eents Collected 30 

Rifles 27 

Rifle Ranges 19 

Royal Military College 23 

s 

Schools of Instruction, Certificates Issued 25 

Signalling 19 

Small- Ann Ammunition 28 

Staff, Clerical 32 

Store Buildings 27 

T 

Training, Active Militia 12 

" Permanent Force 16 

Transport 26 



Veterinary Services . 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 A. 1906 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



THE MILITIA COUNCIL 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 
19 05 



March 1, 1906. 
THE MILITIA COUNCIL. 

1. Fourteen months have now elapsed since the constitution of the Militia Council. 
and the anticipations expressed in the report for 1904 of the advantages to be attained 
thereby have, it is believed, been fully realized. 

2. While a vast amount remains to be done before the organization of the militia 
force can be considered altogether complete and business-like, still the experience of 
the past year gives every ground for hope of success in the future good administration 
of the force. 

3. The Council has held, with few exceptions, weekly meetings throughout the year. 
These meetings, bringing together, at short intervals, the heads of branches to advise 
and consult with the Minister on questions of policy and the large questions arising 
in connection with the administration of the force, cannot but be beneficial in promot- 
ing efficient work in the department. There has been in Council the fullest discussion 
upon all subjects brought before it; records have been kept of the views expressed ami 
of the reasons for the decisions arrived at. All branches of the department have thus 
been kept acquainted with measures proposed, and correspondence and references 
between them have been greatly lessened in consequence. Co-operation has been the 
keynote of the work of the whole office, which bas correspondingly profited thereby. 

4. An important question under the present system of administration is the control 
of expenditure. With the institution of the higher commands, held by officers having 
larger powers of administration, the question of financial decentralization is receiving 
careful consideration. If adopted, the powers to be given of authorizing expenditure 
of public funds will be clearly defined by explicit regulations both as to details and 
extent. To facilitate the preparation of such instructions, a detailed and accurate 
estimate of the various services required for the ensuing financial year has been sub- 
mitted by each officer holding a command, and nothing above and outside of these 

, tailed estimates will be sanctioned, ex< i | i ry urgent nature which 

would be prejudiced by delay. 



8 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1905 
MILITARY- POLICY. 

5. By far the most important event in 1905, from a military point of view, is the 
fact that the Dominion has taken over from His Majesty's regular troops the responsi- 
bility for the maintenance of the Imperial fortress of Halifax, N.S., the control 
which is now entirely in the hands of Canada. It is intended, in the course of 1906. 
similarly to assume control of Esquimalt, for the financial expenditure on which the 
Dominion has already accepted the responsibility. Canada has thus relieved the British 
tax-payer of the burden of any military expenditure whatever for military purposes 
within her borders. On her part, the mother country has treated Canada with liber- 
ality, in handing over the fortresses free of charge, complete up to date, and fully 
equipped in every respect. 

6. In June, 1905, the military members of Council submitted to the Minister a 
memorandum on general militia policy, which was approved by him and laid before 
parliament. To the carrying out of that policy the efforts of the department have been 
steadily directed with satisfactory results. 

7. The additions to the active militia organizations in the North-west, therein con- 
templated, are making steady progress. Owing to lack of barrack accommodation, no 
increase of the permanent force in that portion of the country has yet been possible. 

8. The increase of the permanent corps necessary to enable it to undertake the 
duties of finding the garrisons required for Halifax and Esquimalt has been practically 
carried out. Provision for some of the technical engineer duties alone remains to be 
made. It is hoped that little difficulty will be experienced, when once matters have 
settled down, in maintaining the garrison at its approved establishment. 

ORGANIZATION AND MILITARY TRAINING. 

9. During the year the operations and staff duties division of the branch of the 
Chief of the General Staff has been organized. This division deals with the very im- 
portant work of plans of defence, organization for field service and mobilization, as 
well as the training of the militia, field-days and manoeuvres, and the education of staff 
and other offio rs. 

10. Good work has beeu carried out in all these branches, much of which, however. 
is necessarily of a confidential nature. Training questions have received special atten- 
tion, as well as those affecting the instruction of officers. 

11. In the direction of organization the most important step taken during the year 
past has been the grouping of the military districts of eastern Canada into higher units, 
known as ' Commands.' a step advocated by successive general officers commanding for 
years past. Thus Nos. 1 and 2 military di=i me the Western Ontario Com- 
mand; Nos. 3 and 4, the Eastern < h omand; N s. .*>. 6 and T. the Quebec Com- 
mand, and Nos. S, 9 and 12, the Maritime Provinces Command. 

12. The objects of this org tYord selected officers of the 
militia practice in the higher duties of comm; administration, by placing them 
in charge of large bodies of troops approximating to the commands which they would 
exercise in the event of war; secondly, decentralization, with the object of relieving 
militia headqiiart* freat mass of detail could be far better dealt 
with locally and. thirdly, the inn- ' of a system of administration which 
should be the same both for peace and war. Incidentally the creation of these com- 
mands opens up a far more attri rofessional career for officers of ability than it 
has hitherto fo hem. 

13. The following stall lepartments were allotted for each of 
these commands: — 

- «ff Officers— 

Chief staff officer. 
Deputy-assistant-adjutant-general. 



MILITIA COl YCIL 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

Heads of Departments — 

District Engineer. 

Senior Army Service Corps officer. 

Principal Medical Officer. 

Senior Ordnance Stores Corps officer. 

Senior Paymaster. 

Principal Veterinary Officer. 

14. Of these the chief staff officer and senior paymaster represent the only new 
permanent appointments. Senior paymasters are not yet appointed for the Eastern 
Ontario and Quebec Commands. 

15. For the military districts of the west the previously existing district officers 
commanding were retained. They have also been retained in military districts Nos 
1, 4. 7, 8 and 12, under the supervision and control of the officers holding the higher 
commands. 

16. The change on the whole has worked well, especially so as regards some of the 
commands, but there have been instances where officers holding these superior com- 
mands have not perhaps fully appreciated their position or used those powers and 
assumed those responsibilities which they were intended to exercise and assume. . 

17. These defects have perhaps been especially noticeable in regard to courts- 
martial and correspondence, but they exist also in other graver matters. This fact in 
itself tends to show the wisdom of the step taken, for it is obvious that if such officers 
leave something to be desired in regard to the efficient performance of their duties of 
command in time of peace, they would fall far short of what was required in times of 
emergency or field service, when they would be called upon to exercise far wider powers 
and assume far more onerous responsibilities. Failure on such occasions might mean 
disaster for the country. Hence the necessity for practising the duties of higher 
command in normal times. It is felt that the experience to be gained therein by them- 
selves, their staff officers, and heads of services, will certainly lead, as time goes on, to 
improvement in the expedition and accuracy with which the work in each command is 
carried out, and to greater interest in important questions with which they have hitherto 
hardly been asked to concern themselves, while the efficiency of the militia within the 
command, as well as economical and wise control of expenditure, will be increased 
accordingly. 

I s . Special attention lias been devoted to improving the organization of the depart- 
mental services of the militia. These are the services which are performed by 
Canadian Army Service < lorps, the Army Medical Corps and the Ordnance Stores 
Corps. 

The Army Service Corps is responsible . . feeding and transporting 

the militia. The Army Medical Corps takes care of the sick and. wounded. The 
Ordnance Stores Corps supplies the militia with clothing, artillery, small arm-, 
ammunition, vehicles, accoutrements and equipment of all kinds. 

19. Of these departmental services it has been truly said that without them an 
arm? i march or fight. Being less showy than the combatant branches, 
there is, in all armies, a tendency to keep them in fch md in time of pea 
and the militia has nol been fn his d< fed in the past. Steadj progn 

been made during the year toward- remedying the deficiency. 

The report of the Director-General of Medical Servio blished herewith as 

Appendix II. 

20. The organization of the cavalry and artillery into brigades was effected during 
the year, a step which, it is anticipated, will be of benefit to the service in general, 
and more particularly to those individual branches. 

21. The re-organization of the Royal Canadian Field Artillery as Horse Artillery 
larried out during the 



10 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

INTELLIGENCE. 

22. The Intelligence Division of the branch of the Chief of the General Staff has 
worked satisfactorily during the past year. Reports on various subjects as required 
have been compiled and issued; useful information has been collected and tabulated 
and an intelligence diary has been kept up to date and circulated monthly. 

23. The organization of the ' Corps of Guides,' working under the Intelligence 
Division, has made good progress. Regulations for its administration, establishment, 
pay and instruction, have been drawn up and issued. Special courses of instruction 
were held at the camps at Niagara, Ont, and Sussex, N.B., with satisfactory results. 
The large majority of the officers of the corps in districts east of the Great Lakes, have 
now received their special training. It is hoped that dviring the coming season it may 
prove feasible to extend this training to the officers in the west. Several useful reports 
have been furnished by officers of the corps, who have also given valuable assistance on 
various occasions in regard to questions involving local knowledge and inquiry. 

24. The mapping-section of the Intelligence Division has been placed upon a sound 
footing and has done good work throughout the year, under somewhat difficult con- 
ditions. The transit and level parties have run 1.100 and 1,300 miles of line, respec- 
tively. The topographers have completed 1,775 square miles of accurate survey, an 
excellent record in view of the absence of any general topographical survey of Canada, 
or of any framework of triangulation, to which their work could be referred. The 
surveys executed by this section constitute the only maps of Canada which record the 
physical features of the country, information essential for military purposes. In 
addition to the above work, several surveys have been made of special areas, notably 
of the new Petawawa camp ground, and the Sussex and Aldershot camps, all of which 
have proved valuable to the militia. The sheets of the regular survey now in the hands 
of the lithographers will, it is hoped, prove, when published, equally acceptable to the 
general public. 

ANNUAL CAMPS. 

25. A memorandum for camps of instruction, comprising regulations for com- 
mand and administration, together with a syllabus of the course of instruction for each 
arm of the service, was issued for the annual camps. The intention of the syllabus was 

to cut out many of the less important sections of the drill 1 ks, - as To enable more 

time to be devoted to the essential portions of military training. It was. also, so 
arranged as to admit of progressive training and to give time for greater attention to 
musketry than hitherto. A revised, and it is hoped improved, memorandum is- being 
prepared for the camps of 1906. 

DAT] MPS. 

26. During tl - advantag aken of isull com- 
manding officers as to the dad for the units under their command 
to attend camp. 

Practical unanimity was found to exist among commanding officers at the various 
camps as to the most convenient dates for their dis ad it is proposed to adhere 

NUMBERS PRES 

27. The attendance a( annual drill. the camps of instruction, has 
been highly satisfactory during the pasl year, [ndeed, the total number of men trained 
reached a higher figure by 4,900 than that of any previous year. This was no doubt 



, , MILITIA COUNCIL 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

largely attributable to the system of ' efficiency pay ' introduced in 1904, which in- 
duces good men to re-engage. 

A tendency was, however, noticed in some cases to interpret too loosely the con- 
ditions upon which alone efficiency pay is authorized. Steps are being taken to ensure 
that in future its issue shall be strictly confined to men who are really efficient militia- 
men. 

It is an unfortunate fact that the obligation upon which a man enters when he 
engages to serve for three years in the militia has in effect been allowed to become a 
dead letter. The engagement is purely a voluntary one, but is undertaken on oath, 
and to treat it as practically null is demoralizing to the country generally, as well as 
disastrous to the militia. If it is not to be enforced it should not be exacted. 

Far too many instances occur in which men are picked up at the last moment 
at haphazard, and taken to camp in order to till up vacancies. The class of man thus 
obtained is often undesirable and it is but too clear that abuses have been allowed to 
creep up in this respect. 

LENGTH OF TRAINING. 

28. It is useless to ignore the fact that it is not possible to teach the soldier enough 
in twelve days to make him reasonably efficient under modern conditions of warfare. 
This is true of the infantry and still more so of the other arms. If it is impossible to 
give a longer period for training generally, the cavalry, artillery and engineers, at any 
rate, should be allowed sixteen days training annually. For engineers the extension 
i." especially necessary. Sixteen" days training were allowed for the artillery, with 
excellent results. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

29. A re-arrangement of the system of staff work in the camps was effected, under 
which the work of the general and administrative staffs was separated, the duties of 
each being defined in detail. This re-arrangement, modelled on the same lines as the 
organization of the headquarters staff at Ottawa, worked successfully. It is based on 
the sound principle that the staff system pursued in peace ought to be that which would 
be followed in war. 

The training at camps came directly under the officers holding the higher com- 
mands, and the advantages thereby gained were apparent. These officers were able to 
inspect the different camps in their own area with a thoroughness which, owing to the 
wide distribution of the camps and to their being held at nearly the same time, it was 
impossible for the headquarters staff or that of the Inspector-General to emulate. 

CAMP GROUNDS. 

30. One great drawback to the usefulness of the annual camps has been the lack 
of rifle range accommodation. At Kingston, Sussex and Laprairie there were no rifle 
ranges, though one will be available at Sussex for 1906. Attempts were made at the 
two former places to fill the want as much as possible by the use of the sub-target gun, 
and by miniature cartridge practice, but these cannot take the place of service cartridge 
practice. The rifle range accommodation at Niagara-on-the-Lake was totally in- 
adequate, while that at Levis and London was hardly sufficient, though the work done 
at the latter place was good. 

31. Ottawa and Aldershot alone afford ample accommodation tor this mosl im 
portant branch of a soldier's training. 

32. Want of sufficient space for training was another corns defeel at the camps. 

The experience of recent wars has shown that 'effective' ranges for the rifle begin at 
1,400 yards, and for the gun at two miles. There was no camp at which troops could 
be practically shown what these ranges meant. Niagara-on-the-Lake has not sufficient 



12 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

space for the proper training of a single brigade, but failing any other camp ground 
in ZSTo. 2 military district it was necessary to assemble there three brigades of infantry, 
as well as one of cavalry, besides artillery and other arms. 

33. It is hoped that the acquisition of a suitable training ground, with ample rifle 
range accommodation, for the troops in the Western Ontario command is not far dis- 
tant. 

34. As regards cavalry and artillery, both arms were seriously hampered by the 
want of sufficient training space. The result of this was shown on the tactical field- 
days by cramped action on the part of the cavalry, while the artillery had practically 
no chance of working as they would in the field, until the artillery practice camp at 
Petawawa. 

35. This was the first occasion upon which the new central camp, acquired during 
the year, was used. It is situated in the county mi Renfrew, near Pembroke, on the 
line of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and is, roughly speaking, about eight miles by 
ten. It lies upon the Ottawa river, and affords excellent ranges for both artillery and 
infantry. There is but one opinion as to the advantages of the site for training pur- 
ging taken to prepare it for regular occupation. and it is hoped that 

it will be possible to assemble there, in the summer of 1906, not only a large proportion 
of the permanent force, but also a provisional school of instruction for officers and 
non-commissioned officers. 

KINGSTON CAMP GROUND. 

36. This ground is not satisfactory, and complaints were made by the troops in 
camp. The unsatisfactory drainage of the present camp site was brought to notice 
by the principal medical officer, and the rifle range adjoining has been condemned as 
unsafe. It is situated at one end of the district, thereby entailing unnecessary trans- 
port. 

LAPRA1RD3 CAMP GROUND. 

37. This ground proved unsatisfactory this year, owing to much rain falling dur- 
ing the camp. The ground became a quagmire and proved most uncomfortable for men 
and horses. It will always lie - properly drained. But, on the other hand, 
the troops did uol use the ground available to the bes1 advantage. 

iLDEBSHOT CAMP GROUND. 

38. This ground is most satisfactory. The work done upon it during the last year 
has improved it very much, and, when a sod is obtained, it will be an ideal camping 
ground. 



TRAINING— ACTIVE MILITIA. 

39. Infantry Training, 190.", and Combined Training, 1905, have now been adopted 
he official text-books for drill and training. Constant change of drill books is un- 
desirable, but the present issue is a consideral ivement upon that of 1902; it is 
much simpler, it embodies the result of OS of the South African and Russo- 
Japanese wars, and it is understood that the Imperial authorities consider that no new 
issue is likely to be necessary for many years to come. 

40. Speaking generally, the training of the troops, in spite of the interest evinced 
by them, left much ' fed. There is still too greal a tend p to 
mere drill, and to work always on the level parade grounds, ins -imr the 
men outside of camp, in the far more valuable work of attack and defence, and thus 



MILITIA COUNCIL 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

utilizing their powers of initiative and self reliance. Many officers showed lack of 
confidence in themselves and in their power to command their men. 

41. It was observed with satisfaction that attention was being- paid to recon- 
naissance work, that most important duty of cavalry. 

Tasks in reconnaissance, set by the Chief of the General Staff at his visits, were 
executed by nearly all mounted corps in camp, and several promising reports were 
submitted. 

42. There was, however, a tendency noticeable, especially at the camp at Laprairie, 
to devote too rrfuch time to purely formal parade movements, to the exclusion of the 
really important training in manoeuvre and outpost work. Canada, except on the great 
plains of the North-west, is a difficult country for large bodies of cavalry to work in. 
Special attention should, therefore, be paid to detached duties and the technical hand- 
ling of small bodies in inclosed country. 

43. A system under which cavalry corps carried out the shoeing of their own 
horses in camp was introduced in 1905 with very promising results. It is evident that 
a cavalry corps which cannot shoe its own horses is unfit for the field, but no practical 
system for shoeing the horses of mounted units on service appears to have been hitherto 
introduced. 

ARTILLERY. 

44. Considering the disadvantages under which they have laboured, the artillery 
deserve credit for the manner in which their training was carried out. This was 
especially the case in camps where capable officers, as officers commanding artillery 
brigades, were available for supesvision. 

45. The four days' extra training allowed for this arm in 1905 was. in the case of 
field artillery, devoted to artillery practice and field training at the new central camp 
at Petawawa with excellent results. This being almost the first occasion upon which 
the field artillery have been able to practise under conditions approximating to service 
conditions, good practice was hardly to be expected. This was perhaps largely due to 
the fact that the ranges were entirely different from any hitherto used by the field 
artillery in Canada. There is no doubt, however, that the batteries present learned far 
more of what they would experience under service conditions than at any previous 
camp. The instruction of gun-layers was carried on with satisfactory results. 

46. A falling off in the manoeuvring power of the batteries was reported, as com- 
pared with previous practice camps. This was, no doubt, due partly to the new con- 
ditions, and partly to batteries having trained only at local headquarters. 

47. The training of the 1st 'Halifax' and 5th ' British Columbia' Regiments, 
Garrison Artillery, was carried out under the supervision of the officers commanding 
Royal Artillery at Halifax and Esquimalt, respectively, with the armament which they 
would man on mobilization. 

48. The remainder of the garrison artillery carried out their training as heavy 
and movable armament artillery, with 4 '7 Q. F. and 40-pr. R.B.L. guns on travelling 
carriages. 

49. It is hoped that in 1907 the Hth Regiment Garrison Artillery, may be able to 
train as coast artillery, with modern guns on fixed mountings. 

50. The reports upon the training and practice of the 1st and 5th Regiments, are 
creditable to both corps. The work is reported to have been well done, but rather too 
slowly for service conditions. 

ENGINEERS. 

51. The inn has suffered, hitherto, from having to teach too much in 
the limited ti ne available, and. also, to 3om< extent, from an attempt to combine a 

Fying course for officers with the annual training. 



14 DEPARTMEXT OF MILITIA AND DEFEXCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1903 

52. The four field companies in Canada have had their training equipment issued 
since last year, of which good use was made during their training in camp. They still 
lack service equipment, and, consequently, are not at present in a position to take the 
field in their proper capacity. 

53. The syllabus for the complete training of a field company is so extensive that 
it cannot be carried out in twelve days, except in a superficial way. It will probably 
be found necessary to divide the syllabus into two or more parts, and to instruct in 
only one part at each years training. 

The engineers promise well, however, and it is hoped to avoid this difficulty in the 
future. 

INFANTRY. 

54. The general principle of the syllabus drawn up for the infantry was to elimi- 
nate mere parade movements and to give enough elementary drill to enable brigadiers 
and regimental commanders to get their troops into fighting formation and to manoeuvre 
them properly therein. The results were promising, but it was difficult to get officers to 
abandon elementary drill or to assert themselves enough and to handle their men pro- 
perly at field manoeuvres. 

DEPARTMENTAL SERVICES. 

55. The Army Service Corps worked admirably, and, wherever they were given 
control of the supplies, with excellent results. 

The medical services were very efficient, and the hospitals well cared for. 
The Ordnance Stores Corps worked well. 

Unlike the other arms, the daily work of the departmental services is nearly 
itieal in peace and war. and their efficiency profits proportionately in that the 
practice of their daily work in camp is their best training for war. 

CITY CORPS. 

■ 

56. Most of the foregoing remaiks, though especially referring to corps attending 
camp, are of general application. At the same time the training of the city corps 
generally is reported by the Inspector-General to show steady progress. There is still 
too much attention to mere drill hall and ceremonial drill and too little practical train- 
ing on open and varied ground, where the natural aptitude of men for military work can 
be developed. Target-practice returns show fair progress. It is to be regretted that 
' Judging-Distance Practice.' which is essential to the effective use of the rifle in the 
field, has received little attention hitherto, either from city corps or from corps attend- 
ing camp. 



ill LIT I A COUNCIL 



15 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

57. The number of officers and men trained in district camps is as follows : — 













Received 










Authorized 


Received 


under 12 Days 


Untrained. 




Est ablishme n t . 


12 Days Training. 


Training. 








Military 


93 




r. 

Z j 






03 

U 






: a 




District. 


:'■ z 




o: 






u5 




m 


3 




cc 










.*a 


LU 




.T3 


cu 


o 








- d c 


£ 


- 
- 


-H 


s 


- 

SB 


U § 


2 
o 


8 


°y 


c 




O Z 




o 


Z 


M 


o 


fc 


w 


O 


z 


- 


No. 1 


296 3,109 


633 


113 1.595 


320 


95 


1,306 


222 


88 


208 


91 


o 


741 6,281 


1,332 


348 1,609 


1,035 


65 


461 


37 


32S 


1,211 


260 


3 


297 2,782 


S47 


22o 2.410 


714 


5 


6 


6 


72 


366 


127 


4 


162 1.79S 


505 


122 1,626 


395 


8 


i 


4 


32 


165 


106 


5 

6 


173 1,766 
170 1,622 


1 696 


143 1 681 


1 571 








30 


85 


125 


137 


119 l)537 


58 


8 


3 




43 


n2 


79 


7 


250 2,520 


10s 


212 2,263 


96 




1 




3S 


256 


12 


8 

9 


213 2,154 
249 2,574 


600 


lsr, - 1 068 


512 








27 


86 


88 


406 


203 2.40.". 


322 


2 


5 


2 


44 


164 


82 


10 


60 594 


57* 


46 5 IS 


524 


1 


10 


11 


13 


39 


42 


11 


36 311 


3 


Is 2S0 


3 




i 




IS 


24 




12 


oo 552 


SO 


49 


534 


7S 




13 




6 


a 


2 


Totals. . 


2,702 


26,063 


6,924 


1,779 


21,553 


5.62S 


M 


1,819 


282 


739 


2,691 


1.014 



58. The number of officers and men of city corps trained during the year is as 
follows : — 













Received 










Authorized 


Received 


under 12 Day? 


I NTRAINED. 




ESTABLISHM 


EXT. 


12 Days Training. 


Training. 










2 






/. 




EQ 






'/. 




Military 


° A 






i a 




- _J 






- J 




District. 


■t. 






£ 


6.J 

z^ 




£ 




ED 


s 


§s 


j. 






.•a 


V 






- 




. _ 


V 










- 


u § 


CO 


- 


'-§ 


£ 

a 


- 

- 


~± 


- 


£ 


- = 






z 


z 


S 





z 


— 


O 


z 


a 


° 


z 


- 


No. 1 


153 


1,148 


18 


86 


1.074 




4 




16 


63 


74 


2 


i 


369 


3.519 


75 


216 


3.414 


27 


5 


25 




148 


SO 


18 


3 

4 


96 


912 


15 


79 883 


14 


1 






16 


29 


1 


118 


Q3Q 


11 


8! i Q3S 










"<) 




6 




258 2,458 


145 


171 


2.347 


T, 




30 




87 


81 


18 


6 


44 415 


8 


35 


392 










9 


23 


1 


7 


132 1,270 
5S 544 


165 


74 


1,156 

529 


159 








5S 


114 


6 




7 


44 


7 








14 


15 




9 


133 1,390 


20 


99 


1,141 


13 




86 




34 


163 


( 


in 


4S 372 


4 


28 311 




3 


42 




17 


19 


4 


11 


87 740 


4 


53 499 


4 




74 




34 


167 




12 


12 oon 




12 209 






7 






4 


















Totals. . 


1.508 


13.927 


472 


986 12,894 


333 


13 


264 


16 


509 


769 


123 



16 



DEPARTMEXT OF MILITIA AXD DEFEXCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 
TOTAL TRAINED. 



59. The total number of officers and men trained in district camps and at local 
headquarters during the year is as follows : — 











Received 










Authorized 


Receive 


D 


under 12 Days 


Untrained*. 




Establishment. 


12 Days Training. 


Training. 










71 






m 




S 






£ 







<*> A 






: a 




i = 






r a 






is » 

— — 

£ 1 o* 




DQ 










a 




»i 






(B 




.-t 


O 




O 










,g b a 


£ 
o 


- 

- 


-?. 


s 

o 


- o o 

« , • 1 


2 




■= 


^9 







ok W 


O 


z 


a 


O I z 


w 


O | z 


W 


Dis. Camp . . 


2,702 26,063 6,924 


1.779 


21,553 


5,628 


1S4 1.819 


282 


739 


2,691 


1,014 


Local Head- 


















quarters . . 


1,508 13.927 472 


986 12,894 


333 


13 264 


16 


509 


769 


123 


Totals. . 


4,210 39,990 7,396 


2,765 34,447 


5,961 


197 2,083, 


298 


1.24S 


3,460 


1,137 



TRAINING PERMANENT FORCE. 

60. It is upon the standard of efficiency attained by the permanent force that the 
efficiency of the active militia ultimately depends. It is the duty of the permanent force 
to supply instructors, both officers and non-commissioned officers, for the corps of the 
active militia, as well as to carry on courses at the schools for those attached for in- 
struction. It is therefore essential for the good of the active militia to secure real 
efficiency in all units of the permanent force. 

61. Of late years a tendency has been noticeable- to draw a distinction between the 
permanent force units, as such, and the schools of instruction. This has conduced to 
the school cadres receiving special care and attention, while the efficiency of the per- 
manent units on which the schools depend has tended to become a secondary considera- 
tion. This is essentially unsound, because the schools draw their instruction and 
educational value entirely from the permanent units, not the least important part of 
which education is its regimental life, discipline, and internal administration, upon 
which, as well as upon military training, war efficiency largely depends. 

Hitherto the establishments of units of the permanent force have been kept at 
such a low figure that it has hardly been possible for the officers to train their men 
properly and yet al the same time carry on the administrative arrangements required 
for the conducl of the 3chool. The question of the establishments necessarj for this 
purpose has received the careful attention ol the Militia Council, and new establish- 
ments have been sanctioned which will tend to greater efficiency. 

It may be taken as an axiom that an efficient unit is essential to the maintenance 
of an efficient school. 

62. 'I'll'- training of the permanenl unit.- has hitherto suffered also from their 
individual isolation and want of experience of combined training. A specific period 
should be set aside each yen- for tin field training el' the permanenl units themselves. 
This was done during the past year with the Royal Canadian Engineers, who were 

amped at Levis, (tyebec. With tin- acquisition of the central camp at Petawawa 
new opportuniti' - fpr combined braining arc offered, of which it is hoped to take full 
advantagi in the future. The Royal Canadian Eorse and Garrison Artillerj were the 
Only arm which was able to take advantage of that camp during the past year. 



MILITIA COUNCIL 17 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

MOUNTED UNITS. 

63. The training of the Royal Canadian Dragoons and Royal Canadian Mounted 
Rifles, in addition to the constant handicap of small establishments, especially as re- 
gards horses, suffers also from the want of sufficient training ground. Mounted troops 
cannot train effectively on ground limited to a few acres. Under present conditions 
this defect cannot perhaps be remedied. The only course to pursue is to endeavour to 
get as efficient training as possible while in camp. Commanding officers are fully alive 
to this. 

ARTILLERY. 

64. As above stated the Royal Canadian Artillery alone of the permanent force 
were able to take advantage of the acquisition of Petawawa camp. Even with them the 
training suffered from the lateness of the date at which the ground became available 
for use. 

The Royal Canadian Horse Artillery practised with 12-pr. B.L. guns, the Royal 
Canadian Garrison Artillery with 4 - 7 Q.F., the latter for the first time. 

65. While certain deficiencies and defects iri the materiel became evident, which it 
is hoped to remedy before camp in 1906, and while the practice made was hardly satis- 
factory in either case, yet much must be attributed to the novel character of the ranges 
and the new conditions under which the batteries and companies worked. There is no 
doubt that both branches of the Royal Canadian Artillery learnt far more of what they 
would have to do on service than at any previous camp, and the results obtained gave 
promise of considerable improvement in the future. 

66. The Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery, Quebec, worked hard during the year 
preparing themselves to take over the duties of the artillery garrison at Halifax. 

INFANTRY. 

67. The Royal Canadian Regiment has had, during 1905, many difficulties to 
contend with, in endeavouring to expand its previous very small establishments 
sufficiently to undertake the infantry garrison of Halifax. That it has been able 
to do this at all is much to its credit. The establishments, however, are not yet by 
any means complete, and to attain efficiency during 1906 will entail hard work and 
self-sacrifice. 

ENGINEERS. 

68. As already mentioned the Royal Canadian Engineers trained in camp regi- 
mentally, as one body, at Levis, during the autumn. 

The camp lasted for five weeks, one of which was devoted to musketry. One 
tion was trained in field-telegraph cable work, which was used for the first time in 
Canada. In this they worked creditably, considering that both men and horses were 
entirely new to the work, with the exception of two telegraph operators. 

An attempt was made to cover the first five parts of instruction in military en- 
gineering, viz. : — 

Part I. Field Defences. 

Part II. Attack and Defence of Fortresses. 

Part III. Military Bridging and the use of Spars. 

Part IV. Mining and Demolition. 

Part V. Miscellaneous, 
and field engineers drill, but the time was wholly insufficient to do this in a thorough 
manner, though the corps received a fair general knowledge of the whole work. 

69. This camp offers the only opportunity which the Royal Canadian Engineers 
have to carry out military engineerinc work, their whole time in barracks being taken 
up in the work of their trades. 

35—2 



18 DEP.1RTMEXT OF MILITIA AXh DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

It is hoped to arrange for a larger autumn training in camp during 1906. 
7 1 '. The taking over of Halifax has been a great strain on the corps, but there 
seems every prospect of its carrying- out its new duties with success. 

SCHOOL OF MUSKETRY. 

71. The work of the Canadian School of Musketry was carried out fully as satis- 
factorily as in any previous year. There was only one term of the school, owing to the 
necessity of utilizing the staff in the assembling of the new garrison at Halifax ; and 
the number of officers and non-commissioned officers applying for courses was limited 
owing to the uncertainty, up to two weeks before the commencement of the course, 
whether a course could be held or not 

Officers attending 33 

Warrant officers and non-commissioned officers 22 

Total 55 

Officers obtaining certificates* 26 

Warrant officers and non-commissioned officers 14 

Total 40 

MUSKETRY. 

72. On the whole, fair progress has been made in musketry training during the 
year: Failure to achieve greater results has been due rather to the defective range 
accommodation at camps, already referred to, than to want of zeal on the part of the 
tioops or their instructors. At the same time it must be admitted that it is not 
possible to give the militia soldier anything more than the most elementary training 
in military duties, drill and musketry during the nine working days of camp. The 
city corps are usually in a better position in this respect, and in several cases have 
done their musketry training with thoroughness. More training at moving targets is 
desirable, however. Judging-distance practice is seldom if ever attempted. 

RIFLE ASSOCIATIONS. 

73. The membership and number of rifle associations are still increasing. The 
number of rifle associations gazetted to date are. approximately : — 

Military 106 

Civilian 320 

Total 426 

with a membership <•( : 

Military 12,658 

Civilian 19,353 

Total 32,013 

The increases during tli<- year were: — 

military associations 13 

Civilian associations 65 

Total 7^ 

Increase of membership being 4,151. 



MILITIA COUNCIL 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

74. Certain associations which were not able to keep up their membership, or 
whose affair.* were not satisfactory, have been disbanded. But the interest- taken in these 
associations is still keen, and will probably continue to be so. The great drawback is 
Ihe difficulty of obtaining rifle range accommodation of a permanent nature, it being 
impossible for the' government to provide each of these small associations with a gov- 
ernment rifle range. 

RIFLE RANGES. 

75. The rifle ranges completed during 1905 were the following : — 

Bridgetown, N.S. Cobourg, Ont. 

Goderich, Ont. Port Hope, Ont. 

Vancouver, B.C. Sussex, N.B. 

and extensions were carried out at Hamilton; Long Branch, Toronto: Woodstock, 
NB., and Montreal. 

SAFETY OF RIFLE RANGES. 

Til. There has been, and probably will continue to be. considerable difference of 
opinion as to what is a safe rifle range. A rifle range which is perfectly safe for all 
practical purposes to the skilled shot is not always a safe range when used by the 
novice. Untrained shots become a menace to the contiguous districts, even on a 
normally safe range. If, however, the men using the range have been put through a 
proper preliminary training, it is possible for them to use, with safety, ranges which 
nould otherwise be very unsafe. Under these circumstances there seems to be no other 
way of managing the rifle ranges of rifle associations than to make the association 
officers personally responsible that no shooting is carried on, especially at long ranges. 
by men who are in the least liable to miss the stop-butt. 

SUB-TARGET GUN. 

77. This gun has been used at the various camps of instruction. There can be no 
doubt that when officers and non-commissioned officers are thoroughly competent to 
teach their men musketry a very large amount of extremely good work can be done 
with this gun. Want of time, however, is the main difficulty, as time is not really 
available at camp for this work, and the time taken at the sub-target gun in camp is 
often so much time taken away from practice at the targets. The sub-target gun is 
eminently a gun for use in winter under cover; it requires, however, to be supported 
by good arrangements as to light. 

The gun was a marked success at the camp of No. 4 military district, where a 
trained sergeant from the Canadian School of Musketry had charge. 

SIGNALLING. 

78. For, it is thought, the first time, the question of signalling instruction at 
camps was taken up as a practical question during the past year. The establishment 
of the Corps of Signallers has been settled and regulations laid down for its guidance 
and administration. 

79. As it is almost impossible to instruct rural corps in flag and lamp signalling 
in 12 days' annual training, it was decided to restrict those corps to semaphore signal- 
ling, and to instruct the permanent force and city corps only in flag and lamp signal- 
ling. The introduction of this system has worked well, and the progress made in 
Semaphore signalling by the rural corps lias been hifriily satisfactory. 

35 -2 i 



20 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

80. Flag and lamp signalling have been practised by the city corps, several of 
which have attained very creditable results, as shown by the marks obtained at the 
examinations. The 13th Kegiment obtained the highest place, with the 43rd ; Duke 
of Cornwall's Own Rifles ' second, and the 2nd Regiment ' Queen's Own Rifles of 
Canada' third. In semaphore signalling 546 officers, non-commissiwued officers and 
men of rural corps were trained, of whom 68 per cent passed the test examination. 

ESTABLISHMENTS— PERMANENT FORCE, 

81. In consequence of the decision of the Dominion government to assume, with 
the consent of the Imperial authorities, the entire defence of the Dominion, an increase 
of the permanent force was authorized from 2,000 to (if necessary) 5,000 of all ranks, 
and recruiting was actively commenced in the month of April last for the additional 
force required in connection with the garrison at Halifax. The recruiting was satis- 
factory in point of numbers, and the class of recruits obtained was good, their physique 
being much above the average for infantry of the line. 

Owing to this large augmentation, it was necessary to obtain, for sen-ice in the 
permanent force, a few officers, non-commissioned officers and men from the Imperial 
army. The Imperial government granted the non-commissioned officers and men free 
discharges, with permission to enlist in the permanent force, the Dominion govern- 
ment undertaking to give them in the permanent force the rank they held in the 
army, and to count their army service towards pay, promotion and pension, the por- 
tion of the pension earned in the army to be borne by the Imperial government. 

Two additional companies are in process of formation to replace the two companies 
of the Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery sent to Halifax from Quebec. 

An increase in the strength of the Royal Canadian Engineers was authorized. 

Five additional companies were added to the Royal Canadian Regiment, and are 
now being organized to reinforce the five old companies, which were recruited as nearly 
as possible to their full strength. 

Upon the augmentation of the Royal Canadian Regiment it was found necessary 
tc appoint a commanding officer, its administration from headquarters being no longer 
desirable with its increased establishment. An officer was accordingly selected and 
appointed to the command. 

It was considered advisable to organize a corps of military staff clerks as a separate 
unit of the permanent force, with a strength of one warrant officer and thirty staff- 
sergeants and sergeants. 

82. The following return shows the state of the permanent force on December 31, 
last : — 



MILITIA COUNCIL 



21 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



■jnaiuujaAoj) [suaduii 
uiojj uoisuaj ujim Suuvjag 



Z E- Z = ; 

O Z B ■" - 
S o u O U 

ssisg 

5^oPa5 
I °- 



z 
H 



•SJB3 ^ £ J3AQ 



■sjBa^ £ oj s 



•sjtfa^ c oj J 



•jbo^_ x Ja P n fl 



■>pu<>, 



U01JJ3S3Q 

uiojj patunjajj 



■pajjajsaBJX 



ps^sijua-ay 



•pajspua 



•spnoi 



•pajaajsuBJx 



z 

c 
Z 



•P 3 !<J 



•pajjasaQ 



•pajidia aunj, 

— paSjBuosiQ 



■paptpjAnj 

— padj^qosiQ 



■ajqejinsn i 
— pa3jBuosig 



asBiiojnj 
.Cq paSaBqosiQ 



'S06I 'I£ Jaqnisjaci no utSuaaig 



« • ^ x — 



— CI — CQ 



i- ?c - x t~ co ;c ci ** o c? — ci o 

^h d cc ci ~ c» ^ »o ^ 



i"t-H£Hu;«nfljc 






0)NO©0- < t^ CO 00 CD -r ^ CI 



:C CC — ~ X X O O -* SO 01 X X 

t~ -r co x re co -f co a; in i^ 



^-MM • -h *- -H r 



flasi-* 



rinooeoN^^Hn«Hio« 



CI I -tMSWCKn-tH 



**» ic cc so w to co ci ci ** ■+ sz c. o 
--< 01 -* ^ »c 



"K16I '18 Jaqnraoaa ao qjSujJig 



■juauiqsi|qBis;.i pazuoq^ny 



T ~ >~. ~ X CO CO C X — X t^ -f --< 

cc ?t ~ r- c ci ci ci — ci co ci co co 



c 



■' 



- E r •_- a . 



199993 ^ggfe 

c — r — r -t*. ^ *c: *T 



a. 

DO - 

- : 
z- 
--. 
■ i ■- 

o C g o # -i 

x > - -^ 5 

c 



tio 



JtJ-O 

- - - 

= z 
r. r. r. - 



- 

PS 



ci n ?. n - 

>. >. >. >. >. ~ 

a o D o - 



- 1 - = : 

r e- r 

" - i c 



22 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

ACTIVE MILITIA (OTHER THAN PERMANENT FORCE). 

83. In order to secure as fax as possible uniformity in the strength of cavalry and 
mounted infantry units it was decided that the normal establishment of each mounted 
unit should be four squadrons. Corps, however, that had already been organized with 
five squadrons were permitted to remain at that strength. 

84. During the year the following changes in the organization of militia units, 
other than the permanent force, were authorized, viz. :— 

(a) An additional squadron to the 5th ' The Princess Louise Dragoon Guard-." 

(b) Two additional squadrons to the 10th ' The Queen's Own Canadian Hussar-.' 

(c) One additional squadron to the 14th King's Canadian Hussars. 

(d) Two new cavalry regiments were also authorized in the province of Alberta 
ami Saskatchewan, one as the 15th Light Horse, and the other as the 16th Mounted 
Rifles. 

(e) Three new squadrons of the Canadian Mounted Rifles were also authorized in 
the North-west. 

(f ) The 6th field battery was reorganized. 

(g) The 96th ' The Lake Superior Regiment,' with headquarters at Port Arthur, 
was authorized, as also the organization of an infantry regiment in Saskatchewan. 

(h) Three additional companies of the Canadian Army Service Corps were 
authorized. 

(i) The following corps were disbanded: — 

' G ' Squadron, Canadian Mounted Rifles, and the Dawson Rifle Company. 

85. During the past year the organization of eighteen new cadet corps was an 
thorized ; twelve cadet organizations were disbanded, leaving a net increase of six over 
the number existing on December 31, 1904. 

86. A permanent pensions claim board was appointed at headquarters, to deal with 
claims arising under the Militia Pension Act, and claims for compensation for injuries 
.ir illness not covered by regulations. 



APPOINTMENTS. 

87. The following are the mere important appointments made during the year :— 

(a) Militia Council: The appointment of accountant was merged into that oi 
accountant and paymaster-general, on the organization of a pay department for the 
militia and the assumption of extended responsibilities for audit. 

(b) Headquarters staff: — 

Branch of the Chief of the General Staff — 

Lieut.-colonel W. G. Gwatkin, p.-.-'.. was appointed director of operations and • 
duties. 

Major D. I. V. Eaton, p.s.c. Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, was appointed 
assistant-director of operations and stafi duties. 

The appointment of an assistant-director of intelligence was substituted for that 
of intelligence staff officer, held by Captain A. ('. Caldwell. Royal Canadian Engiia. rs. 
Brunch of the Adjutant-General — 

The position of deputy-adjutant-genera] was abolished, and that of assistant- 
adjutant-general substituted; Major II. A. Panet, D.S.O., Royal Canadian Horse 
Artillery, was appointed to the position. 

('■) Commands ami military districts: — 

Western Ontario <'ommand ( Inchidimi rnnmand of military district No. 2) — 
Colonel and temporary Brigadier-General W. 1>. Otter, c. B. 
Chief staff officer, Lieut.-colonel S. J. A. Denison, C.M.G., Royal Canadian Regi- 
ment. 



MILITIA COUNCIL 23 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

Eastern Ontario Command (including command of military district No. 3) — 
Colonel W. D. Gordon. 
Chief staff officer, Lieut-colonel V. A. S. Williams. Royal Canadian Dragoons. 

Quebec Command (including command of military districts Nos. 5 and 6) — 

Colonel L. Buchan, C.M.G. 

Chief staff officer, Lieut.-colonel 0. C. C. Pelletier. 
Maritime Provinces Command (including command of military district No. 9) — 

Colonel C. W. Drury, C.B. 

Chief staff officer, Colonel J. D. Irving. 

Military district No. 7 — 

Lieut.-colonel A. Roy, from the command of military district Xo. (5. 

ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE. 

88. Brevel Colonel R. X. R. Reade. p.s.c., vacated the appointment of commandant 
of the Royal Military College, and Lieut.-colonel E. T. Taylor, p.s.c, was appointed 
commandant in his place. 

The annual report on the college is published herewith as Appendix 111. 

1XSTRFCTI0X. 

89. Two examinations for promotion, under the same conditions - - f officers 
of the regular army, were held during the past year, viz. : in May and Xovemher. 
the former of which twenty-seven officers presented themselves for examination, and 
nl the latter, fourteen. As regards papers submitted by officers of the Canadian per- 
manent force, the following extract from the report of the Director of Staff Dut 
War Office, on the examination held in May, 1905, in subjects D (military history, 
military law. tactics, engineering and topography"), and E ( artillery >. is of inter - 

' Taking the sub-heads of D as a whole, the best of the twenty-seven officers of the 
Canadian permanent force was Lieut. J. L. H. Bogart. Royal Canadian Engineers, 
with 1243 marks. Taking into consideration the many disadvantages under which they 
laboured as compared with officers serving in England, the officers of the Canadian 
permanent force are to be congratulated on the result. 
•Subject (E).— Artillery. 

' Officers of the Royal Canadian Field Artillery. The general result very fair. 
This result would undoubtedly have been better but for the apparent fact that the Royal 
Canadian Field Artillery has not yet been equipped with certain appliances, such as 
'• directors,'' " field plotters." &c. Officers consequently have had no opportunity of 
becoming acquainted with their use, so their knowledge of them is purely theoretical. 
Answers are generally clearly expressed.' 

90. Long courses of instruction, one in March and one in September, were held at 
.the Royal Military College. Kingston, with good result*, largely due to the cordial co- 
operation of the commandant and staff of the college. It is hoped still further to extend 
this system of instruction, by holding a special short course for officers desirous of 
competing at the entrance examinations for the Royal Staff College, England. 

91. The two lonjr courses referred to resulted as follows: — 

March, 1905— 

Total number who attended I 5 

Total number of candidates preparing for promotion who did 

not take. the examination 4 

Total number who passed the examination 12 



24 DEPART11EST OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCS 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

September, 1905 — 

Total number who attended 18 

Total number of candidates preparing for promotion who did 

not take the examination 8 

Total number who passed the examination 8 

INSTRUCTION IN ENGLAND. 

92. Two officers of the Royal Canadian Artillery were sent to England to attend 
the gunnery staff course, but one of them was relieved from that course in order to 
attend the Royal Staff College. 

ENTRANCE TO STAFF COLLEGE. 

93. In January, 1905, two officers were selected to attend the course of instruction 
at the Royal Staff College. 

94. The Commandant of the College having reported that officers from Canada 
had found difficulty in keeping up during the course with the other officers studying 
at the college, from want of previous professional instruction, it was arranged with 
the Army Council that in future officers from Canada should be admitted only after 
qualifying at the entrance examination. 

95. Two officers of the permanent force presented themselves for the entrance 
examination in August, 1905, but did not succeed in reaching the required standard, a 
result partly due to lack of facilities in this country for preparing for this examination 
which is somewhat severe. Officers of His Majesty's Imperial Army usually prepare 
for it with the assistance of specialists in their profession (army crammers), which 
gives them an advantage over Canadian officers, who are unable to obtain such assist- 
ance except in mathematics and languages. 

96. The special short course at the Royal Military College, already referred to 
(paragraph 90). is designed to meet this difficulty as 'far as possible. 

TACTICAL FITNESS FOR COMMAND TEST. 

97. Three officers, sent to England for the purpose, successfully passed the tactical 
fitness for command test. 

TRAINING. 

Schools of Instruction. 

93. The provisional schools authorized during the year were as follows: — 

i ',-ivalry — Brandon and Quebec. 
Engineering— Niagara, Ottawa and Montreal. 
Infantry — Montreal and Quebec 
Medical — Ottawa. 
Signalling — Ottawa. 

Canadian Army Service Corps — Ottawa and St. John. 

99. Following i< a list of certificates U-uied to ottieor-. nou-eomiiiissioned oil 
and men of the active militia during the year: — 



MILITIA COUNCIL 



25 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 







■PWI 


t 


- 


— L." 


£ 


is 


* '* r 




- 


rS — 


TTTI" 




c 




saaujBj ; — 
































— 


SJ81SBJ{ pJB_i^ 'jssv 




























to 


= 


SJ3JSBJV PJ»M j 




























K 


1" 


■Sj3i9ng paB sjaisdanux | '* 








- 






















12 


sjaotgO aouaSriT^jai IsiQ-qng 




















to 












I" 


■sjaogjQ aona^ijpinj *}StQ 




















a 












1° 


M Us- 
ui: i id . 


•pagtjtmfr 






























?J 






M 


-paqsmSuifsig 




























- 








* C /' 
s r - 
5 > r 

^ -- ~ 


•saaogjO \" 


























a 










•5J901JJO 




























- 






ph 


a 

z 

< 
z 

s 

on 


O 


«a. 3 p« j o 


























C 

c 










G 
CO 


•sjojJtujsnj issy 


























X 










IN 


s 

e 




,a. spojo ; 
























t~ 












•SJOUtUlbUI 
























N 










at} 


•sjaipjBqtnog 
































I <^ 

IN 


•spjjodjoQ _ 


t- — i> m 


u* 
























- 


3! Nt-ass^ai 
•sjaBaSjas; "' 


















o 


z • 


•sjojoiuisui juBa3aag 




























z 


ID 

B 

5 


•aoijBjmbg — 
























>a 1 — 

t~ 1 00 


sjaatnSng pjoraqoax 1 












3 












12 


o ■* m o o a 
•sujajpjqng " — - •' - 


M N -r 






?l 












— 
s 

(N 


•suibjcIbj 


:•. r. k 

— ■*- 


— t- c c: io 




01 






O 
C>5 






•sjaoiyo Pl a !J 




ri ZMM* 




o 






U3 


IS 


3SJI103 Snog 






N 




- 




















" 






a 

^o 

— 

r. 

= 
- 

- 


: 

: 
c 

> 

i 

7 
P 

r 
- 

■J 

> 
c 


i 

; 

i 

s 

^a> 

> 

a! 

C 

*: 
z 

-„ 
/ 

i& 


7 

- 

. E 
t 

c 

! 

: 

Y 

. - 

• 


i 

- 

7 
[ 

: 

7 


f 

: 
1 


| 

t- 

* 

: 
f 


4- 
f 

e 

'7 

-i > 

; 


>< 

C 

c 

t 

1 

c 

c 

/ 

~- 


a 
a 

". > 

e 

: 
7 

-.5 
c 


1 
; 

'5 

* 

- 

— 


: 
: 
« 
- 

c 

I 

~ 
: 

'a 

| 

■i 
< 

j 


- 

9 

: 
: 

1 

'5 

: 

b 

B. 

_ = 
E 


3 

c 
c 

~z 
'o 

'; 
•■ 

'b 

5 

i 

7 


i 

: 
: 
-= 

7 

~ 

c 

"5 

'> 

t 

a 

'5 

t - 

7 

; 


> 



— 

a 

} 


B 

"c 

] 

E 

•/ 
- 

T 

J 
S 


1 

c 

': 

'- 
e 

c 
: 









= 

a 
is 



26 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

MEDALS AND DECORATIONS. 

100, Decorations and medals were issued during the year as follows: — . 

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration 45 

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Long Service Medal 121 

Long Service and Good Conduct (permanent force) 3 

General Service Medals 11 

North-west, 1885 7 

Total 187 



TRANSPORT. 

101. The transport supplied by the various railway and steamboat companies has 
been on the whole good — a great improvement on the service formerly rendered, par- 
ticularly by the passenger department. 

The transport of horses is not yet all that it should be. The ears furnished were, 
in many cases, inferior. The running of the horse trains was slow and the engines 
badly handled by poor engine-drivers, who started and stopped the trains so abruptly 
that the horses were often injured, thereby causing unnecessary expense in claims 
against the public. 

102. Wheeled transport has been fairly well registered, particularly in Ontario 
and the Maritime Provinces, but not j-et in the province of Quebec. That supplied by 
the Canadian Army Service Corps at the camps was very satisfactory. As none was 
furnished by the artillery or cavalry this year, all the work fell upon the Canadian 
Army Service Corps. 



VETERINARY DEPARTMENT. 

104. This branch has been put on a better basis by the appointment of principal 
veterinary officers in each of the higher commands. As these officers are to have the 
supervision of the other veterinary officers in the several commands, a marked improve- 
ment in this branch of the service may be looked for. 



RATIONS. 

105. The rations supplied by the various contractors at the different depots and in 
the several camps of instruction have been satisfactory — a marked improvement on 
former years, owing, no doubt, to the fact that the supply officers are now trained in 
judging supplies and have a knowledge of what they may insist on from the contractors. 



( AMP COOKIXG-RAXGES. 

106. A further supply of camp cooking-stoves has been obtained and distributed. 
They proved a great benefit wherever used, as the food cooked upon them was much 
more palatable than that cooked on tin- ..Id pattern stoves usually supplied by the 
company commanders. 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



MILITIA COUNCIL 27 



FUEL SUPPLY. 



BARRACK^. 



107. A radical change has been made in the fuel supply. Wood, which was formerly 
used to a large extent by the permanent units has been abolished as a ration, and coal 
only will be used in future by them, except for kindling. This change should result 
in a large saving in the expense of heating the several barracks and quarters. 



FUEL FOR CAMPS. 



108. The substitution of coal for wood at the annual camps will be made as soon 
as a sufficient supply of camp ranges is secured; this should save much fatigue duty in 
cutting and splitting the wood now supplied, to say nothing of expense. 



STORE BUILDINGS. 

109. New buildings with magazine accommodation are in course of erection at 
Winnipeg and London. They will provide for a much-felt want at these stations. 
New buildings at Toronto and Montreal, delayed owing to difficulty in finding sites, 
are much needed. At Toronto the present old wooden buildings are out of date and 
inadequate to the wants of a large district. At Montreal, the stores are now kept at 
St. Helen's island, communication with which is completely cut off for weeks during 
spring and autumn ,and sometimes during the winter as well. 

110. At Halifax the transfer of the fortress from Imperial to Dominion charge 
will, it is hoped, provide additional accommodation for stores in the buildings now 
occupied by the Regular Army Ordnance Corps. At St. John an extension of the 
present building is needed. At Ottawa additional space is required for storage of 
clothing and for housing vehicles received over from the contractors. They are at 
present stored in the exhibition buildings, subject to removal whan asked for, and 
entirely at government risk. The congestion cannot be relieved by transfer to out 
stations, as all are equally crowded. 



CAMP EQUIPMENT. 

111. For the first time, probably, in the history of the department, it was possible 
during the recent camps to meet the demands of the troops assembled for annual drill. 
A reserve of camp stores is still needed to meet an emergency should one arise making 
it necessary to order the city regiments into camp. It must be remembered also 
that under new conditions an increased and varied supply of equipment is requisite. 
Much improvement, however, in this respect during recent years is apparent, but more 
care is necessary in demanding equipment for camp use. 



RIFLES. 

112. Armourers were sent to camps of instruction to examine and make necessary 
repairs to arms in charge of the troops assembled. There is an apparent want of care 
on the part of the militia in looking after the arms issued; officers commanding do not 
exercise sufficient supervision; the regulations as to tampering with sights and ex- 
changing bolts are not observed, and deficiencies of rifles from armouries are of frequent 
occurrence. 



28 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

113. Snider rifles, converted to the same length as carbines, are now being issued 
to cadet companies. They seem to be very suitable for the purpose, being much lighter 
than the Martini-Henry rifle, or any other arm heretofore issued. 

114. The armourer section is kept fully employed, and this will continue so long as 
the present issue of rifles is in use. Many rifles must of necessity soon require brown- 
ing, and a large demand for new barrels, owing to repeated tiring and neglect, must 
soon be expected. 

SMALL-ARM AMMUNITION. 

115. Issues of small-arm ammunition "303 ball, were made during the year as 
follows : — 

Militia units 1,029,299 

Rifle associations 2,106,166 

Military Rifle League ','1.200 

Dominion Rifle Association 92.820 

Repayment 352,230 

Total :ij;71.Tl.". 

Receipts from Dominion Arsenal during the year S.119.100 



NEW REGULATIONS. 

116. Regulations for issue of clothing to the militia generally, were compiled, and 
issued during the year. 

Regulations for the Ordnance Stores Corps were compiled and issued, and Equip- 
ment regulations are in progress. 

ARMAMENT OF THE MILITIA. 

117. There are available at present, in the hands of troops and on store charge, 
sufficient magazine rifles and carbines to arm the whole of the militia. A considerable 
number of them, however, are Ross rifles Mark I., a weapon which though thoroughly 
serviceable, is to be replaced by Mark II., a considerably improved pattern. The bulk 
of the Ross rifles Mark I. is, therefore, to be held in reserve for use in ease of emergency, 
and is not to be issued for the present, unless in very special cases. 

From this it results that some few corps are not yet in possession of magazine 
rifles. It is hoped, however, that all corps will In- armed with them by the end of the 
year. 

118. Progress with the delivery of the Ross rifle has, owing to difficulties of manu- 
facture, not been as satisfactory as tin- expectations of the company had lead them to 
anticipate. The matter is receiving all care and attention, and any delay at present is 
to be accepted as precautionary. A much larger amount of work has been done by the 
company than the number of completed rifles delivered would lead one to expect. 

119. The reserve of small arm ammunition, although ^till much below the accepted 
irtion, has increased by nearly 1,000,000 rounds during the year. 

120. The reorganization of the field artillery, and its allotment to brigades was 
authorized and partly completed, hut the entire distribution of guns and equipment 

■ be completed until such time as proper armoury accommodation is available. 

It is intended to re-arm the field artillery with the most modern quick-firing guns. 

and a supply ha-; heen ordered. A- a temi>orary measure, and to tit in with the future 

organization, the number of guns in a field battery has been reduced from -ix to four. 



MILITIA COUNCIL 29 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



121. The heavy field batteries have been organized on similar lines, and the 4-7 
guns on travelling carriages have been distributed as far as possible. 

122. The first lot of the new 18-pr. batteries are reported to be well under way, so 
far as guns and carriages are concerned. They are being made by Messrs. Vickers, 
Sons and Maxim. The limbers and wagons are to be made in Canada, but can hardly 
be said to have been commenced yet, though a large amount of material has been 
collected for them. This delay has been due to the non-receipt of working drawings 
and specifications from the War Office. 

123. The whole of the approved armament of Halifax has been taken over at that 
place from the Imperial troops. It is complete and up to date. 

124. The heavy armament for the sea defences of Quebec is \mder order. Delivery 
is expected before June 30, 1906. 

RESERVES OF ARMS AND AMMUNITION. 

125. The approximate scales of reserves for guns, small arms and ammunition of 
all kinds have been laid down, but some considerable time must, in view of the require- 
ments of the existing corps, elapse before any real progress can be made with that 
accumulation of reserves which is absolutely necessary in order to provide for an 
emergency. 

PATTERNS, PROVISION AND INSPECTION OF GUNS, SMALL ARMS, AMMUNITION, fcc. 

126. The increasing necessity of providing sealed patterns for every article of an 
ordnance store nature, and for the systematic arrangement of such patterns in suitable 
pattern rooms, has not escaped attention, in view of the policy of manufacturing all 
articles in Canada for whose production proper facilities exist. 

127. With regard to the provision and inspection of guns, so far all our ordnance 
has been obtained in England, mostly through the War Office, and inspected by the War 
Office inspectors. No doubt, however, the time is coming when we shall he able to have 
armament made in Canada, and when that time arrives, many questions relating to 
supply and inspection will have to be considered. 

128. As regards inspection of small arms, an application was made to the War 
Office for the services of a duly qualified inspector, and an officer from the Royal 
Small Arms Factory at Enfield Lock has been loaned for the purpose. The 
inspection of all arms, both small arms and guns, should be carried out by inspectors 
not in any way connected with the manufacturers. In the event of any such sup- 
plies-being made by private firms in the near future, the importance of this cannot be 
over-estimated. 

129. The local manufacture of equipment in Canada is gradually increasing and 
it is hoped that in time the country will be self-sustaining in this respect. 

130. A number of wheeled vehicles of a technical nature have been constructed by 
the Ottawa Car Company. The company has also carried out alterations and repairs 
to gun carriages and equipment. This class of work being new to the company, some 
defects have naturally shown themselves, but they have been rectified. A selected 
officer was sent to Woolwich to qualify in the inspection department at that arsenal. 
Testing appliances are under order, and there is every reason to expect that future 
manufactures will be satisfactory. 



TECHNICAL INSTRUCTION AT ARTILLERY SCHOOLS. 

131. The need for an up to date institution at which instruction can be given in 
the higher branches of artillery, including the applied sciences connected with manu- 
facture, has been much felt, especially in connection with the taking over of the modern 



30 DEPARTMEXT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

heavy armament at Halifax. What is required is a scientific school of gunnery, re- 
presenting both the Ordnance College and the School of Gunnery in England, includ- 
ing an experimental branch, at which both ordnance courses and gunnery staff courses 
can be given. The establishment of such a school is under consideration. 

Proposals for the improvement of the technical instruction of both field and garri- 
son artillery officers are also under consideration, in order to bring the standard of 
education up to a modern and higher plane. 

ARMOURIES AND BUILDINGS. 



132. New armouries have been completed, or are in course of completion at the 
following places : — 



Stratford. 

Chatham. 

St. Catharines. 

Cobourg. 

Three Rivers. 



St. Hyacinthe. ■ 
Woodstock, N.B. 
Virden. 
Rossland. 



QUEBEC DEFENCES. 

133. Considerable progress has been made with the defence of the approaches to 
Quebec from the sea. Batteries for modern guns on the St. Lawrence, a short distance 
below Quebec, are well under way. and ought nearly to be completed during 1906. 



CAMP GROUND, LEVIS. 

134. The water supply of the camp ground has been completed and an excellent 
supply of good water furnished. By some clearing and reclaiming leased land this 
property will, it is hoped, be made one of the best of the training grounds. 



MILITARY PROPERTIES. 

135. The rent collected for military properties, under lease, for the year ending 
.Tunc 30. L905, was as follows : — 



Hist rid 



Amount. 



Military 
Military 
Military 
Military 
Military 
Military 
Military 
Military 
Militarv 



ets. 



District No 


1. ..■. 


I >i - 1 1 i. ! No 


*> 


District No 




District Mo 


1 . 


District No 




District No 






S. 




9 


District No 


11 



71 


in. 


290 


00 


:i7.'. 


is 


25 


00 


220 


25 


1,474 


BS 


71 


25 


66 


(17 


6Q 


00 



Total. 



$2,654 20 



MILITIA COUNCIL 31 

SESSIONAL PAPER N). 35 

136. The total receipts show a considerable falling off as compared with the pre- 
ceding year, which was almost entirely due to a number of tenants having got into 
arrears. The arrears, however, were practically all paid by December 31. 

137. The following military properties not being longer required for military pur- 
poses, were transferred to the Department of the Interior, to be sold, viz. : — 



Station. 



Property. Remarks. 



Montreal St. Helen's Island, containing 123 acres, 'Sold for S200.000 to the city of Montreal. 

! 3 roods and 20 perches. 

Quebec Piece of land facing St. John St.. Quebec. [Sold to Compagnie d'Auditorium, for the 

sum of S500. 

Quebec Narrow strip of land lying between St. Donated to city of Quebec, for purpose of 

John st. and land sold to Auditorium widening St. John street. 
Company. 



The St. Helen's island property was sold under the following conditions : — 

(a) To be used exclusively for park purposes. 

(6) A small area at the summit, to be selected by the Master-General of the 
Ordnance, not to be built on, but reserved in the event of possible future military re- 
quirements. 

(c) The department to be allowed to use the present store building and site thereof, 
with a right of way thereto, free of charge, until store buildings have been erected 
elsewhere. 

The old drill hall, with site thereof, at London, Ont., consisting of one acre more 
or less, was sold to Edward Shea for $13,250. 

LANDS ACQUIRED. 

138. The following lands have been acquired for military purposes :— 

Petawawa. — Large area of land, in the county of Renfrew, Ont., as a site for a 
central camp. It is bounded on the south by the south branch of the Petawawa river 
to its junction with the Ottawa; on the north by the boundary line between the 8th 
and 9th concessions of the townships of Wylie, and right bank of the Chalk river, &c. 

New Westminster. — A site for a rifle range. 

Sydney, N.S. — A site for a rifle range. 

Ottawa. — Extension to Rockliffe range — 52J acres purchased from Mr. C. H. 
Snow. 



THE DOMINION ARSENAL. 

139. The work carried on at the Dominion Arsenal during the year was highly 
satisfactory. The output of S. A. A., with the factory working 50 hours per week, was 
over 9,000,000 rounds. Working at its utmost capacity, day and night, the output could 
be increased to 20,000,000. 

The annual report of the superintendent is published herewith as Appendix IV. 



CLERICAL STAFF. 

140. The civil <taff of the department have performed their duties during the year 
most satisfactorily. While the clerical staff, military and civil, has increased during 



32 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFEXCF 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

the year, the increase has not kept pace with the increase in the volume of work in the 
department. This necessarily involved many clerks continuing their work long after 
the ordinary civil service hours. The cheerful manner in which they did this, a habit 
acquired during the South African War, and continued ever since, but not to so great 
an extent as during the past year, is most commendable, and deserving of approbation. 

FINANCIAL. 

141. The expenditure for 1904-5 totals well up to $4,000,000, being the largest 
amount expended on the militia in any one year. 

142. It is $400,664 in excess of the expenditure for the previous year (1903-4 i, the 
increase being principally for the following services : — 

Pay of permanent force $145,189 

Annual drill 137,490 

Construction and repairs, military properties 47,408 

143. The increase of $145,189 in the appropriation for pay is due to the enlist- 
ment of some four or five hundred additional troops for the Halifax garrison towards 
the close of the financial year, and to the higher rate of pay authorized for the per- 
manent force in November, 1904. 

144. The increase of $137,490 in annual drill expenditure is due largely to the effici- 
ency pay, which was authorized late in 1903-4 for the' non-commissioned officers and men 
of the active militia, and drawn by those only who trained in the June camps of that 
year, whereas in 1904-5 it was drawn by practically all who. trained. 

145. The following statement shows the numbers who drew efficiency pay in the 
two years, respectively, and the amount paid in each year : — 

1st year 2nd year 3rd year Amount of efficiency 

men. men. men. pay. 

1903-4 5,107 1,220 2.534 $ 33,436 

1904-5 12.413 5,415 9,486 113,432 

146. The following statement shows the total numbers paid for annual training 
in the two years, respectively, also the total amount of pay and allowances drawn, in- 
cluding efficiency pay : — 

Officers. X.-C. Officers. Men. Total all ranks. Horses. Total pay. 

1903-4 2,682 7,279 23,496 157 5,459 $431,915 

1904-5 2,572 7,589 23,307 33,468 4.S94 530.487 

The total annual drill expenditure for the two years is summarized as follows: — 

Pay and Transport. Supplies. Total 

allowances. expenditure. 

1903-4 $431,915 $77,635 $52,675 $562,225 

1904-5 531,594 93,8 74.317 699,724 

147. The additional expenditure of $47,408 in connection with construction and 
repairs, is due principally to $30,01 d thi Quebec walls in excess of pre- 
vious year, and to $12,000 expend -I on the Quebec drill hall for paving the flc 

ue. 

148. The expenditure for other services, excluding paymi nts on account of reserve 
stores, is about the same as for the preceding year, and needs no comment, with per- 

capital. The state- 
ment for the year which follows, shows the total expenditure und< r this vote sepai 
while the comparative statement for shows th<- total expenditur 

each of the various services, respectively, whether chargeable to capital or income. 



MILITIA COVNCIL 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

149. The following services have benefited by the vote chargeable to capital for 
the year 1904-5 :— 

Military properties — 

For rifle ranges and their construction $ 80,161 

Purchase of lands for military purposes 10,243 

$ 90,404 

Clothing — 

For reserve clothing. . . $272,658 

Warlike and other stores — 

For reserve stores of saddlery, harness, blankets, tents, &c, 

&c $328,696 

Arms and ammunition — 

For ordnance, quick-firing guns, &c $292,905 

For rifles 240,301 

$533,206 

Dominion Arsenal — 

For reserve ammunition $75,000 

150. It is highly desirable to have this vote continued for several years still, in 
order that the force may be equipped with a sufficient number of the latest pattern 
rifles and guns, &c, and that a sufficient reserve of clothing, stores, &c, may be built 
up in case the militia should be called upon suddenly to take the field. As the militia 
is maintained solely to be of service in such an event it must be apparent to every one 
that in order to have it effective it must be well armed and equipped and ready to take 
the field without delay. 

151. Reserve stores of all kinds are necessary, as they cannot be procured at short 
notice in large quantities. Even if a portion of them were procurable in a time of 
emergency the cost would be much greater than if purchased beforehand in the re- 
gular way. 

152. Following are the usual financial statements : — 



35—:! 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1905. 



Votes for Militia Services, 1904-1905. 



Expended. 



By Statute — 

Pav of Chief of General Staff. Inspector-General. Adjutant-General. Quartermaster- 
General and Master-General of the Ordnance 

By Vote- 
Pay of staff, permanent corps and active militia, including allowances 

Military Survey— Intelligence Branch 

Annual Drill 

ind wages of Civil Employees 

Military Properties, Works and Buildings 

" " Stores 

" Clothing and Nei essaries '. 

Provisions, Supplies and Remounts 

Transport and r reight .... 

Grants in aid <>i Artillery and Rifle Associations and Bands and Military institutes 

Miscellaneous mid Unforeseen Contingen ies 

Royal Military College "1 Canada 

1 lominion Arsenal 

... Esquimalt, B. C 

Departmental Library , 

Monument — Battlefield. Fort Erie 

" ( iarrison Ground, Annapolis. X. S 

Suitable Tablets on Rock at Citadel. Quebec 

Gratuities 

Special Service South Africa, balance from 1903-4 

Capital Account - \rni-. Ammunition. Rifle Ranges, hands. Reserve Clothing, 
Equipment, tc., including $75,000 for manufacture of Reserve Ammunition at 

Dominion Arsenal 

Sydney Mines Si rike 

Valleyfield Strike. 

Montreal Longshoremen's Strike 



Tidal. 



Less repaid on special service. 



' 



Militia. Rebellion, 1885 SI''' ,419 64 



S cts. 



14.69S 78 



677.S63 70 

11,245 5S 

699.724 43 

64.9S3 51 

255.653 73 

74,707 74 

179,943 12 

165,189 GO 

54,783 IS 

49,100 50 

34.9S0 99 

S6.477 50 

1511.562 76 

109.9S6 67 

847 68 

3,000 00 

5.000 00 

1.250 00 

4,735 90 

397 61 



1,299.964 42 

5,309 09 

121 70 

534 20 



(3,951,062 36 

1.219 53 



$3,949,S42 S3 



Fenian Raid.&c 

Upper Canada. Rebellion of 1837-38 

Act, 1901 



Total. 



2.337 (M) 
280 00 
7,101 46 



138 10 



MILITIA COUNCIL 



35 



SE SIONA - PAPER No. 35 



Revenue. 


•? cts. 


$ cts. 






19 9S8 13 




12.054 79 

i 20 

5,985 57 














20,694 56 
25.472 16 







Total. 



66,154 85 



35— 3i 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



S a 



-t"*^ © 


"t --H 


C13CIOO 


O-H 


r - r. /: i - 


-*o 






- — r- • - 


©© 


©.©■<*© 


©co 


© CI 


o 


CNhN 


SO IQ 


tz a — a 


ri t- 


?l CO 10 JO 


M O 






W*C?1 


©CO 


© CQ l0 SO 


— r- 



co os re © t- re x © re r>. 

X x oc c n c - re— ^ 

~. ■"! tVi^*o i> >> "O 0* 

— id -r ~ co id t-* -r re a> 
01 so us — x cn ei ic o 

— — «** i- 



H HC f H 



Le — i- — — -r re in 
i-e oa x — c re re a 
a — r: ov*oa —_©_ 

V © ©~ -#* i>*~ © © 

o tj* * ei cs t-~ © 



; DO 



r. - : 
■e" — ~" © 

JO OB 

CO — 



ices 

(O^h 

-- CO 



- X - © X M ^ TT 
C ©_ © Cl ©, X^ t-^ ©_ 

© t^ id ©" ©" pi » — 

re re r- ^ © © >-' 



O 

co 



3 
Hs 

1 



OS 

o 

g 



o 
u 

p 

-r 

a 



ia 

a 

Ed 

■< 
H 
CC 



M 


00 


•^ 


l: c c c 


— — 


— 


0) 


■* 


n « cc x 




C5 


o 


r~ 


■c r: r~ t ~ 














■* 


o 




0»CQt»G 


T 3 


■* 




>o 


M C! 1- ?1 

lO n 


t^ CI 


M 




IN 


!- IC X A 





c: 


n 


A 


<~ ~ ~ ■'. 


a r- 


o 


~ 


a, 


rt — ?) "X 














^H 




o 




— 10 


■* 


■« 


t>. 


IC X DC 33 


t^ r. 



© CO © 



©*C re — n re 

SO T. 05 ©^Nf-^J* 

© ©' — t-* -r i-Tocf 

DO CO 00 o (N r* 01 

IN N — 



i- — \z r- 



-ccr:--co-H 

?i re -i a i-e — — i~ 

a c t-e i- c — q^^oq^oo 

c: c ei c — * Le" x x* x* r: 

re re t — re <# N *o^» 

r-i —< ^ ue re 



— c c — 
none 

03 O ~ I- 


c-. t^ 
— / 

z-. a 


— Z T- A. 

ei t- re — 


© X 



re n D ei x -* x r; ^ Le 

-r. ~ n - -r <-e — os o <N 

oT© 3r«wcfcr«i>roo"' 

DO CO CO O (D Cr-Ni-H 



lO OS » — 

■?{ x'-r'c" 
ei -^ re X 



A - 

e / 



c i.: l: c x x tj< o 
t^ ci ~ r- x ~* oi (-*• 
oa ■*,«,©* ^O i-i — _ 

V of uf TtToo «r«'*' 

CO ^ 



ri rt — .- 

— — — — 



- A 

O© 

©00 

■*©" 



CONWCC X ~ 

r- © re re ■ -r ■ 1 oa 

c^o ^X;h- c: re_x_ 

oT io" oo" w ewef cT^* 
co co i-o r* t> ^ r-> •»* 





w 


-C 


n 


-a S. -' — 




K5 


t- 


or; 


oaoo 




M 


— 


01 


rtOO-H'T 


w 












^ 


CO 


Or^osro 




■* 


10 


o 


M C :t [ - 



r - r. z re 
re r. < - re 
cq 0> — i \ 

o p \ — — r 



O0©©tNu0XCOO3 

r. -e — oa to *e e» — i 

co~ oa cT co tfTio id" i-eT 
t re to io rj« -^ rt< 



— — r- re >e ei © c re o m 

33 >" ?l MUJONOt 05 

© ~+ ro t >e — i' © © c x 



! S S :i 

■S MS : £- 

a g 3 3 "~ 



— - -- 

- - c 
a : : 



- 3 



z = = = = 

3 ?.-'" s u" 
a- P - = 
■S C O u — 

a «3r-i 3 Si 



o- 



g 

- = 
■ .- 



o : 



- = 

- - 



= - — 

* b — 



- 
a 

a 

- r. 

: . 
S L' 

a - • — a *■ 

§ 23 " 

- = t- 

o— a s 

a a SS 

3.9 .- '7 



a 






L" = 



; - 
IB ^ 

o 






; 

-— - - - - s r. 

"S.2jsa!"i< 

a - c - s a a-a 3 o »3 



: s ^ < > ?• - 



'. - 



— a 

- ^. 

- a 



5' 3 

c© ! 

M 3 J 
ce) - i 

** J3 i 



MILITIA COUNCIL 



37 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 





oso- 


1 C* 


) 


-- a : 


■ io 




KKWC 


> c 


5 


o xr- 


U) 




MCO-*- 






C231 


• ^h 
















«to°y 


■ c: 




C 09. <-' 


> o 




iH 


c 


1 


ri — p 


i to 




OCOtOi 1 


i c 




-#U5C 


1 CM 




MI--— ' C 


> 




000 


—i 




?)tccir 


) 


i 


xoc 


) X 
















or-a 


> 0( 


) 


CI c 


! CO 






c 




-h c- 


1 ■* 




300 00 


EC 




cocotc 


U5 




OEDX 






n»f 


l> 




MNH 


5 




x^c 


<N 
















NX* 


c 




b- c 


eq 






o 




—I c 


■* 




3-1 1~ 


« 




so — c 


^f 




OtO-i 


1* 




— DC 


CO 




•;on 






IOK Cn 


w 
















NX 






X— <c- 


CO 




i-H 


c 




■H C> 


M< 




coco 


CN 




MNS 


iH 




oreo 


•<?. 




ON?" 


» 




x co— i 


O 




BNC 


■» 








^ 








MX 






iOWCn 


"5* 




T-l 


CN 




IN COO 


X 




— 09 iH 


c 




HO< 


>o 




T COt^ 


If 




on:: 


^ 




X SO W 


t- 




<N-"U 


X 
















<m"x" 






(oeiTi- 


■ o~ 




i-H 


e> 




cn e\ 


■* 




CCON 


IT 




O rH t£ 


to 




MX-H 






cn toe 


IN 




i-^ON 


5 




■**a>"- 


a 
















-*SNX 


Cs 






CO 




i-t 


C\ 




U5 O 


r- 




O — X 


a 




»■"< 


X 




/>H 


c 




sooa 


— 




— / T. 


c 




o*« 


CO 








_ 








— ax 


c- 




rH IT 


r» 




»H 


Cs 




<N r- 


CO 




OTf* 


X 




oxc 


HH 




MOJO 


1^ 




f CNCv 


0) 




OXX 


cn 




x-Hir 


■* 
















-•(NX 


K 




CO « 


o 




t-t 


M 




0) r- 


■* 


= 


DIN 01 


<* 




U0COCN 


o 




'JCO 


— 




CO OX 


w 




r-xw 


a- 




OOrHOC 


00 
















-Tn-oT 


co 




ci- To- 


co" 




tH 


M 




N i- 


>* 

































L- 






E 












•A 
z 






/ 
rH 




E 
o 
w 






a 


















(4 






) 




3 
z 

S 












H 

& 






1 


i 
•a 

i 






t: 


a!" 

as* 


•*- 


g 






s 


' H 






'3»-9 




P3 






jt 




— 
i 


/ 

"I 








« 


~ 


- 






1> 

c 

/ 


J 


} 


- 






4 

? 




1 
I 





38 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 
REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR-GENERAL. 

153. The duties assigned to the Inspector-General, by Ordor i;i Council, ar< ns 

follows : — ' 

The Inspector- General is responsible to the Militia Council for watching the course 
of training of the militia throughout the country, and for reporting to Council any 
deviation from the rules laid down by Council for the conduct of that training. For 
this purpose he will have authority to visit as frequently as he thinks advisable, all 
schools of instruction held by the permanent force, in order to watch the system of 
training thereat. 

The report of the Inspector-General is published herewith as Appendix I. 

F. W. BORDEN, 

President. 

E. F. JARVIS, 

Secretary. 



IXSPECTOR-GENERAL, CAXADIAN FORCES 39 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



APPENDIX I. 

Ottawa, January 2, 1906. 

From the Inspector-General, Canadian* F> ra< i a, 

To the Honourable 

The Minister of Militia, in Militia Council. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report upon the corps of 
the militia that were inspected either by officers of the headquarters starf acting for me; 
officers within the higher commands; officers of the 'Inspector-General's Branch'; or, 
by myself, the division of the duty, to some extent, being necessary in consequence of 
the fact that the office of the Inspector-General, being a new one, could not be per- 
fected in all its details for several months after its creation, and from the further fact 
that the training of the militia, especially in the district camps, was carried out so 
closely upon identical dates that it was not possible for the officers of my branch and 
myself to make all inspections within the year, although our familiarity with the work, 
after the past year's experience, will facilitate our work and insure the accomplishment 
of more satisfactory results. 

It will be seen by the ' abridged annual reports of corps.'* attached herewith, that 
they contain merely the most useful and important information relating to each unit, 
ir a condensed form, taken from more exhaustive reports, but containing, practically, 
sufficient information to allow of the merits of any corps being summarized and under- 
stood at a glance. 

I regret to state, in connection with the above, that I have found it to be a most 
difficult task to complete these abridged reports from the meagre returns sent in by 
certain officers upon whom it is incumbent to promptly furnish complete and intelligent 
information. 



PERMANENT CORPS. 

I commenced my inspections by visiting the units of the permanent force in 
February last, as they were the only corps then at work. I continued the inspections 
at opportune times throughout the year, and, while I found the condition of things 
generally, in regard to them, very satisfactory, I also found that the unsettled state 
some of them were in, in relation to the transfer of officers and men detailed to garrison 
Halifax, militated against the perfect state that they are at all times expected to main- 
tain, and against the instructional work that can only be carried out to advantage when 
the instructional nuclei are free from the excitement caused by an abnormal state of 
things, as has naturally been the case with some of them since the occupation of Hali- 
fax, by the permanent corps, was decided upon. 

I found that drill hall accommodation, for the permanent corps and the attached 
officers and men of the active militia, at Wolseley Barracks, London, was greatly 
needed, and, at St. John's, the drill hall at the barracks is a mere apology for such, and 

* Not printed. 



40 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

quite inadequate, in fact is better suited as a gymnasium than for the training of a 
company of infantry, or those attached to a depot. None can benefit by instruction 
given on a barrack square during severe winter weather, as I experienced, last year, 
both at London and St. John's, and if the instruction of the attached officers and men 
more particularly, is to be effective, the conditions surrounding their training must be 
reasonable, and made comfortable. 



ACTIVE MILITIA. 

CAVALRY. 

This is a very popular branch of the service throughout Canada, and, as a rule, the 
personnel is admirable ; the horses, also, are good in the rural districts, especially where 
the majority of the officers and men own the horses taken to camp, and where, gener- 
ally speaking, all ranks are not only horsemen but horsemasters, the horses gaining 
very rapidly both in flesh and appearance after the first few days, more especially when 
stabled, instead of being exposed to the weather upon the horse lines, which latter was 
the case in the cavalry camp, at Laprairie, where the weather was wet and inclement, 
the horse lines deep in mud and water, and the horses suffered from the exposure. 

Occasionally horses are accepted and passed by veterinary officers as ' fit ' that 
could not stand one day's hard work under service conditions and be fit for a succeed- 
ing day's work, and, therefore, unserviceable from the first; another feature is that 
some men who own valuable horses will not risk them in a camp where they are well 
aware there is no stable accommodation; they, therefore, select comparatively worth- 
less animals for the training. 

A building set apart in each cavalry or field artillery camp for the treatment of 
sick horses would prove advantageous, as contagion might be checked, and the treat- 
ment of sick horses made easier and more effective than when carried out in the open 
in all sorts of weather, both by day and night. 

There is quite as much zeal shown by all ranks as in any arm of the service, but it 
was noticeable, in some instances, that an unequal proportion of the instruction was 
loft to the permanent corps instructors, regimental officers and non-commissioned 
officers merely watching the training. 

This mounted force appears to be well equipped, but the rifles are awkward to carry 
without the support of either buckets or arm slings, evidently causing the men much 
inconvenience in their efforts to retain them and at the same time manage their com- 
paratively raw and unbroken mounts. 

The issue of the Portmouth bit has proven a boon to mounted units. Steadiness 
has succeeded extreme restlessness, and both men and horses appear to have become 
changed beings, compared with what used to obtain when the bit and bridoon were 
in use. 



ARTILLERY. 

The training of the artillery units, as shown in the following return, proceeded 
very much as in previous years, except in the case of the Eoyal Canadian Garrison 
Artillery, which was kept in an unsettled state for several months pending the transfer 
of a large proportion of its personnel to Halifax. 



INSPECTOR-GENERAL, CANADIAN FORCES 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

FIELD ARTILLERY. 

The Field Artillery trained as follows : — 



41 



Military District. 



Corps. 



Place. 



Date. 



No. 2. 



I st Brigade, F. A 

No. 1 1 ltli Field Battery 

16th Field Batterv 

6th Field Battery 

2nd Brigade, F.A 

4th, 7th and nth Field Batteries. 

5th and 14th Field Batteries. . . . 

2nd and Sth Field Batteries 

3rd Field Batterv 

15th Field Batterv 

1st Field Batterv'. . . * 

8 10th and 12th Field Batteries. . . 

No. 9 17th Field Batterv 

No. 10 13th Field Batterv 



No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 



London . 



Niagara . 



June 19. 



13. 



Barriefield " 27. 

Rockliffe " 19. 

St. Helen's Island " 20. 

Laprairie " 19. 

Levis " 19. 

Sussex " 27. 

Aldershot Sept. 12. 

Winnipeg July 4. 



GARRISON AETILLERY. 

The various garrison artillery units carried out their annual training as below: — 

1st Regiment, C.A. — 

1st Division, at Halifax. N.S. 

2nd Division, at Halifax, N.S. 

2nd Regiment, C.A., at Montreal, P.Q. 

3rd Regiment, C.A., at St. John, N.B. 

4th Regiment, C.A., at Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

5th Regiment, C.A., at Esquimalt, B.C. 

6th Regiment, C.A., at Quebec, P.Q. 

Cobourg Company, at Cobourg, Ont. 

While the dates upon which the training of the field artillery batteries are shown 
above, as they went into camp for twelve successive days, it is difficult to state speci- 
fically upon what dates the garrison artillery units carried out their training. There 
can be no doubt, however, but that, so far as facilities were afforded, it was faithfully 
and well performed in every instance. 

The practice of the field batteries, including that of the permanent units, was 
carried out at Petawawa, except in the case of the 3rd, 5th and 12th Field Batteries, 
owing to their inability to furnish the usual details at the time it was considered most 
convenient for them to do so, but for which no blame can be attached to anyone, as the 
ranges, only recently acquired, could not possibly have been prepared for practice until 
the season was very far advanced, too far, indeed, to allow of the completion of the 
whole artillery practice for the year. 

The Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery having been obliged to leave Petawawa to 
proceed to Halifax, the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 6th Garrison Regiments and the Cobourg 
Garrison Company were unable to put in their practice, but that of the 1st and 5th 
regiments was carried out, a? usual, at Halifax and Esquimalt, respectively. 

Preparatory to the practice, of course, was the ordinary training either at local 
headquarters or at a camp of exercise, which training, judging from the reports re- 
ceived from inspecting officers, and my own personal observation, was well attended to 
and effective, in some instances remarkably so, all ranks appearing to be active and 
zealous and having a particularly business-like look about them, more noticeable, per- 
haps, in corps supplied with ordnance and technical equipment of modern pattern 
practically up to date. 



42 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

As will be seen by the abridged reports upon the corps that did their firing, at 
Petawawa, that the results were by no means satisfactory. This may be accounted for 
partly because the preparation of each unit for the practice was not as perfect as it 
might have been, but also, and more likely, from the fact that the conditions of the 
practice were absolutely different to anything these corps had been accustomed to. 
Previous efforts in firing had been made on open ranges, where the targets were in full 
view, while, at Petawawa, a magnificent wilderness presented itself to the officer com- 
manding the firing party, who, somewhere within the maze of wooded distances, had 
first to locate his objective and then determine the range. 

The manoeuvring was not, as a rule, well done, but there again battery commanders 
found themselves in a novel position, yet just where they might expect to be if before an 
enemy, in a rough undulating country hedged in on every side by some of nature's 
impediments that had to be dealt with before the firing point could finally be selected, 
or the targets located. 

The practice with the 5-inch howitzer of the 1st Brigade, Field Artillery, was made 
uninteresting and disappointing from the fact that they were not provided with 
shrapnel shell. It may do very well to fire at targets extensively surrounded by water 
with plugged shells, but when such projectiles are merely filled with water as a sub- 
stitute for a bursting charge, and descend without exploding at some 3,600 yards from 
the firing-point, among dense scrub or shifty sand, the result is lost, the gun layer ia 
at sea. and the detachment disappointed and discouraged. 

Observing from a splinter trench the firing with the 12-prs. at 2,500 yards upon 
' infantry ' targets, the effect was most imposing and seemingly disastrous to the 
' infantry,' but the official return of the results told a different story — the practice from 
the 12-prs. was not good. 

. While the above statements may not appear to be encouraging, yet, when all the 
difficulties that surrounded the training and practice, last autumn, at Petawawa. are 
duly and fairly considered, there can be no reason to conclude that any but the very 
best results will come from the experience all ranks gainer! at that camp, and, as the 
work expands and becomes more perfect, year by year, greater possibilities f or improve- 
ment will offer, greater facilities for efficiency will arise, and all ranks will awaken to 
the importance of being able to manoeuvre and effectively use the guns they are pro- 
vided with, as if upon active service, in the presence of an enemy. 

It is quite natural that during the training and while returning to their head- 
quarters, the guns, harness, equipment, &c, of a field battery will get more or less into 
a condition that will require months of hard work for one caretaker to again put right, 
the consequence is that everything deteriorates, the iron rusts, and the leather perishes 
for want of oil and dubbing, which might all be avoided were a few men employed by 
the department to give the whole outfit a rough cleaning up immediately the unit 
returned to its headquarters, the caretaker putting on the finishing touches, more 
leisurely. 

The present artillery harness is large and out of proportion to the ordinary class 
of horses turned out with field batteries, and were some improvement in the matter 
of harness brought about, certain batteries might profitably march to the mobilization 
camp, which would give them a fair chance of testing their harness, besides affording 
an experience to all ranks in one of the mosl important of their many duties. 

ENGINEERS. 

This arm of the service is one very difficult to maintain in an efficient state. A 
very large number of the officers and non-commissioned officers arc not techs 
qualified, the ordinary provision for instruction being inadequate, but this was partially 
set right at the practical school established, with a three monthsj course, and held at 

camp l.i'v'.- in September, last, where remarkably g t work was done, and when 

1 officers qualified in practical military engineering. 



INSPECTOR-GENERAL, CANADIAN FORCES 43 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

From what I saw, at Levis, I concluded that the construction work, such as carried 
out there, might well be taken material advantage of, for instance, at Petawawa, dur- 
ing the coming season, at the same time giving it an educational value were a temporary- 
school authorized for that station. The facilities for engineer work offered, at 
Petawawa, are unequalled. 

The four engineer companies, established at long distances apart, cannot well be 
mobilized as one unit for training, but they might, individually, be made profitable 
use of. and to their own advantage, as well, were they sent into their respective district 
camps two days previous to the arrival of the troops', and were they, also, permitted to 
remain for a day or two after the departure of the troops. This being authorized, their 
services could be utilized in preparing the camp ground, completing the water supply, 
repairing latrines and small buildings, &c, and drawing and classifying their own 
stores; then, at the end of their training, and the breaking up of the camp, they might 
take down and store away certain structures, fill in pits, and return their own surplus 
stores to the ordnance branch, no light task, all told. 

It is evident that on the principle accepted that it is practically impossible for city 
corps to give their time up to camp life even for the prescribed twelve days' training, 
so is it equally impossible to secure the attendance of the whole of any engineer com- 
pany at a district camp for twelve days, as the personnel is drawn chiefly from the 
towns — much of which might be remedied or obviated were they recruited to a greater 
extent from rural districts. 

As a rule the whole of the equipment requisitioned for by officers commanding 
engineer companies is seldom issued, which seriously handicaps officers commanding 
in their efforts to carry out the prescribed syllabus. 

Where engineer units were included in the operations of tactical field days, it was 
felt that it would have been more in keeping with their recognized functions had they 
been given some duty entailing strictly professional technical knowledge, such as build- 
ing a bridge, pontooning a stream, &c, and not have considered them as if they had 
been merely acting as infantry at a field-day. They might have gained some knowledge 
from the one, but little, or no professionally technical knowledge, certainly^ from the 
other. Their scientific usefulness is gone when included among the purely fighting 
units. 

CORPS OF GUIDES. 

The duties of this corps are varied, and while only organized two years ago, ex- 
cellent and useful work is being done by them in matters of surveying and furnishing 
valuable information. 

The training of the officers was carried out at several of the district camps during 
1905, many of them having passed the prescribed examination held at the Niagara and 
Sussex camps. 

As yet it has not been considered necessary to include non-commissioned officers, 
or men, beyond a certain number of batmen, within their ranks. 

INFANTRY. 

The infantry, both city and i> ral corps, appear to be steadily gaining in 
efficiency, the ' m.s.' and ' v.b.' officers having almost all retired, and few. if any, of 
the officers appointed previous to 1904 have Failed to qualify for the rank they hold. 

In the city corps the non-commissioned officers appear to be remarkably capable, 
the section commanders taking part with zeal and intelligence in the drill, lutt. in the 
rural corps, the opposite is more in evidence, the section commanders merely remain- 
ing in rear of their sections, leaving the weight of the drilling, so to speak, in too many 
instances, to the permanent corps instructors, and where ibis was the case, I had the 
section commanders fall in with the rank and tile to be taught, as they could not teach. 



44 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD Vll, A. 1906 

The permanent corps instructors are invaluable, but there is a proper way in which 
to take advantage of their services. Without some defined rules in regard to them — 
some defined system for utilizing their services — much of their valuable time is 
wasted. 

It is long and continuous service and attention to drill and duty that make the 
efficient non-commissioned officer and the reliable soldier, and there is a feeling of hope 
evident, at last, that with the better pay and liberal treatment of the rank and fi.e, 
men will be induced to take a deeper interest and pride in their corps and in their work, 
and continue to serve as long as they are useful and physically fit, and thereby become 
helpful in the organization, discipline and training of their respective corps. 

There is a marked improvement in the dress of the officers, that is to say their 
dress is more uniform and more recent pattern, and the Sam Brown, a belt which makes 
a very smart appearance, especially when worn with the blue serge trock, is much in 
vogue. The brown boots worn with brown leather gaiters add to the soldierly appear- 
ance, and have proved to be serviceable, and, in this combined dress, an officer is 
practical y prepared for any duty, mounted or dismounted. 

Mounted officers, in some instances, have failed to procure regulation or even pro- 
per mufti saddlery, and often, where such is the case, the so-called ' charger ' is much 
in keeping with the saddlery. 

There is a disposition to leave off the sword, unless at ceremonial parades, which 
adds to the fact, no doubt, that the majority of officers are in no way expert in its use. 
Their experience in the use of the revolver is equally limited. 

The arms and equipment are serviceable, the -303 rifle rapidly taking the place of 
the Snider-Enfield, which may seriously lessen the number of rifle shots throughout the 
Dominion, as there will be fewer rifle ranges available to meet the long distance require- 
ments of the more effective arm, and, consequently, the short 'loea?' ranges, at one 
time numerous, will necessarily be abandoned, and the rifle practices and small matches 
must follow suit. 

The clothing issued to the men is apparently good and well fitted, and the lack of 
serviceable boots not so much in evidence as at former camps, arising probably from 
the fact that the selected men now joining the force can better afford a better boot, the 
men of the city corps keeping up their foot gear, as formerly, which all greatly adds to 
the usefulness and efficiency of the soldier who must march on foot. 

What head dress shall, or should be worn is still a moot question, and while city 
corps appear in some degree to be satisfied with present arrangements, the majority of 
those who attend the training in camps appear to favour some pattern of light hat that 
can be made to look smart with a slight ornament in addition to the puggaree already 
authorized. 

RIFLES (CORPS). 

The above remarks relative to infantry apply equally to rifle regiments, but I may 
add that the brown belts worn with rifle uniform detract from the smart appearance of 
riflemen, more especially in the case of officers; but there are rifle corps in which the 
officers wear black belts with silver mountings, while the men wear the brown belts, 
and, when in addition to this, one finds a few officers or men in khaki, the appearance 
of such corps can be better imagined than described. 

ARMY SERVICE CORPS. 

The several companies of the Army Service Corps successfully maintained, 
throughout the training of the troops to '•amp. during 1905, th< high standard of effi- 
ciency and usefulness they were credited with on account of their services during 1904. 

The bread turned out by them at several of the camps was exceptionally good, hut, 
in one or two instances, the first day's baking was somewhat spoiled through the ovens 
not having been set up in time to thoroughly teat them before the arrival of the troops. 



IXsPECTOR-GEXERAL. CANADIAX FORCES 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

From what I can learn it would be in the interest of the service, and give greater 
satisfaction, were the slaughtering, in addition to the baking, carried out by the Army 
Service Corps, instead of by the local butchers. 

ORDXAXCE STORES CORPS. 

While I have had no opportunity of inspecting this branch of the service as a corps, 
in the general acceptation of the term, yet I have inspected several of the subdivisions 
that go to complete the Ordnance Stores Corps. I found that not only were all ranks 
of this branch carrying on their prescribed and varied duties zealously and faithfully 
in quarters, but that they were proving themselves to be invaluable factors in facilitat- 
ing the work required of them in connection with the issue of equipment and stores to 
the several camps of instruction, the accomplishment of which means so much to the 
comfort and efficiency of the force. There was never a time in the history of the militia 
when the camp equipment, taken all round, was so complete, serviceable, and promptly 
dealt with as at present. 

At the suggestion of the Quartermaster-General, I visited several of the branch 
stations, where I found that the work of the subdivisions, above referred to, was very 
much handicapped for want of sufficient help. In fact, I found valuable stores de- 
teriorating because the personnel employed at the stations, from no fault on their part, 
so far as I could learn, were unable to cope with the pressure of work entailed upon 
them. 

In certain of the camps, the examination of arms (rifles) by armourers somewhat, 
unfortunately, interfered with the prescribed syllabus of corps undergoing training. 
Armourers' shops may have been provided in the different camps, wherein damaged 
arms may have been repaired, but it appeared to be more desirable to have rifles that 
were out of repair attended to before being taken to camp, and save interfering with 
the training, for which there is but a very limited time available. 



CAMPS OF INSTRUCTION. 

In several of the camps in which corps were inspected by me I found the work 
being earnestly and well done, but in those camps where the officer commanding the 
higher command (acting as a district officer commanding, or camp commandant) and 
his staff were in charge, instead of a district officer commanding, or a commandant 
especially selected, and his staff, I found that proper attention was not given to the 
troops, at drill, because the officer commanding the higher command and his staff had 
either to neglect their ordinary office work connected with headquarters and the higher 
command, the latter involving, possibly, three districts, or be absent from or neglect 
the training of the troops — very naturally the troops were the losers, the fact being 
apparent that the door was rather, on occasions, left open to certain irregularities and 
short comings, for instance, and not infrequently, senior officers were late in their 
attendance on parade, were actually absent, in fact, and that while other officers, 
temporarily taking their places, might carry out. in a fashion, the syllabus of train- 
ing prescribed, there appeared to be a lack of uniformity, no two regiments, &c,, pro- 
ceeding with the same detail of drill at the same time; no period of rest observed, and 
insisted upon, without all of which the best results cannot accrue. 

The absence of regimental majors, also, reported as attending lectures in the camp 
lines, appeared to be not a little felt, detrimentally; and the ciistom, or habit, of 
'mounted' infantry officers appearing on the forenoon and afternoon parades, without 
their horses, produced a bad effect, and greatly handicapped them in the supervision 
cf their respective commands, or half battalions. 



46 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AXD DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

CAPPING GROUNDS. 

This is a subject hardly within my province to refer to, as Inspector-General, but 
at the same time the question cannot be but of the greatest interest and importance in 
relation to the mobilization of troops for training, and as, for many years, I have had 
a full knowledge of the possibilities of the different camping sites of all the older 
provinces, I submit the following remarks in relation thereto, and, in addition, I have 
taken the liberty of including the central camp, Petawawa. 

MILITARY DISTRICT NO. 1., LONDON, ONT. 

Comparatively small, but well situated, easily drained, and remarkably dry, con- 
sequent upon the porous nature of the soil, and found adequate when one-half the force 
of the district, only, is trained at one time, as has been the custom for years past. A 
rifle range has been provided in the vicinity. Exceptional opportunity for miniature 
target practice is also afforded. 

MILITARY DISTRICT NO. 2., NIAGARA, ONT. 

Inadequate for the very large force trained at one time; but, were the training 
carried out, as at London, that is to say divided, this ground might be found suitable. 
The situation is somewhat awkward to reach on account of the transport of troops, 
stores, &c, having to be made to a flank of the district. On the other hand, strategic- 
ally' it is of the greatest importance; there are very old historical associations con- 
nected with it, and it is a popular place of rendezvous. There is a rifle range available, 
and a sufficient water supply at hand. 

MILITARY DISTRICT NO. 3., BARRIEFIELD, ONT. 

With a small expenditure for improvement by draining, and by collecting the too 
numerous loose stones, Barriefield Common might be made a desirable camping ground, 
one objection to it, however, being that it lies upon a flank of the district, another that 
there is no rifle range available within reasonable distance. The latter difficulty has, 
to a certain extent, been overcome by practising the force with gallery ammunition. 
Good water supply available. 

MILITARY DISTRICT NO. 4., OTTAWA, ONT. 

A must satisfactory move was accomplished when the force of this district was 
brought to Rockliffe Park for their annual training, but the present ground is too 
limited. There are other sites, however, in the neighbourhood of Rockliffe, close to the 
city of Ottawa, available, convenient to the present Rockliffe rifle range, and to an 
excellent water supply. 



MHJTARI DISTRICTS NOS. fi \Nl> 6, I.AI'HAIKIE. 

The camping ground is within an hour's distance from Montreal by steamer, and 
lies close to two systems of railway thai form a junction al Brosseau's station. It is, 
probably, the eldest of all Canadian camping sites, ami has been successfully camped 



INSPECTOR-GENERAL, CANADIAN FORCES 47 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

v.pon time and time again, but, unhappily, the most desirable portion of the original 
ground has been fenced off from the troops, and the less desirable part only left for 
?nilitary purposes. But. even this portion, with a very small expenditure of money, 
might be so improved by drainage that, in ordinary summer weather, it would be not 
only adequate in extent, but dry and suitable. There is an opportunity, also, for tem- 
porarily establishing a safe rifle range, and water can be had, for the horses of mounted 
troops, at the River St. Lawrence, and, for the troops, from the town of Laprairie, one 
mile distant. 

THREE RIVERS. 

Three Rivers. — An ideal site and very complete, immediately outside the limits of 
the city of Three Rivers, with a first-class rifle range and good water. "Were the land 
lying between the present camp and the St. Maurice river secured by the department 
there would be ample room for the 3rd Brigade of cavalry in addition to the usual 
complement of troops, which would obviate the necessity for this cavalry brigade being 
sent to Laprairie. Of course, Sherbrooke, the chef -lieu of many of the surrounding 
counties from which the 3rd Cavalry Brigade is recruited, is really the proper centre 
for their mobilization, would be more popular with all ranks and would prove a saving 
in transport. 

MILITARY DISTRICT NO. "., POINTE LEVIS. 

This is a commodious and convenient location for a camp for the troops surround- 
ing the Quebec military station, but parts of the ground should be levelled and thereby 
add to the present parade ground. There is an excellent water system in operation, 
and a suitable rifle range. 

MILITARY DISTRICT NO. 8, SUSSEX. 

A perfect camping ground and plenty of water. A suitable rifle range has been 
provided since the last annual training. 

MILITARY DISTRICT NO. 9, ALDERSHOT. 

An ideal camp site in every particular, in fact one of the best in Canada, and be- 
ing rapidly improved by a systematic removal of the scrub, and improvement of the 
cleared land. An admirable rifle range lies within the precincts of the training grounds. 

MILITARY DISTRICT NO. 12, CHARLOTTETOWN. 

The troops of this station generally camp in the vicinity of Charlottetown, where 
there is an ample supply of water and a good rifle range is being provided. 

CAMP SITES, GENERALLY. 

From the above it is quite apparent that there are a few camp sites extremely 
limited in area for the purposes for which they are used, but so long as a rifle range 
and a good supply of water arc- available, and they arc conveniently located for the 
mobilization of the troops concerned, the inconvenience of a limited area might be 
tolerated where the syllabus of training is of an elementary character, more particularly 
in view of the fact that the extensive territory, at Petawawa, is suitable and available 
for the more extensive manoeuvres, tactics, or gun practice. 



48 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA A\D DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
THE CENTRAL CAMP. 

Camp Petawawa is situated teu miles to the west of Pembroke, on the south bank 
of the Ottawa river, intersected from east to west by the Canadian Pacific Railway, 
both river and railway affording transport facilities sufficient for military purposes, 
and, in addition to this, the road to Pembroke is a good one, and the roads leading in 
many directions throughout the domain are all that can be required to facilitate camp- 
ing, or manoeuvring. 

As this territory, consisting of several thousand acres, had only been secured by 
the department for a camp site and artillery range at a late date in 1905, it was found 
practically impossible to prepare it sufficiently and in time for the full completion of 
the military training and work required to be carried out for last year, the following 
being some of the most pressing requirements, namely : — 

A landing wharf on the Ottawa, at Petawawa ; a railway platform on the Canadian 
Pacific Railway within the camp lines ; horse shelters in artillery lines ; store buildings 
and water supply. Again, the several artillery ranges had to be located, measured, and 
targets, shelter trenches, &c, built, before any gun practice could be proceeded with, to 
say nothing of having to induce the local settlers to move out, the above, after all, only 
representing one-half of what had to be accomplished, in the matter of details, before 
this important encampment and the several ranges thereon could be made sufficient 
and safe. 

In face of all the difficulties that had to be met and overcome and the loss of time 
involved, before gun practice could be gone on with, a great deal of good work was 
accomplished. 

The advantages to be gained by the artillery personnel who may be trained in 
manoeuvre and in the practice of their arm of the service, at Petawawa, cannot be over 
estimated, as heretofore it might truly be said of them that they had been ' cribbed, 
cabined and confined ' to the barrack square or the parade ground, and to flat and open 
ranges, while, at Petawawa, an artillery commander will find a terrain extending far 
beyond his natural vision, extensively covered with timber, dotted with lakes and re- 
cently occupied farms, and intersected with rivers and rolling ground, a panorama 
presenting a scene seldom to be met with, even in picturesque Canada, and certainly 
not to be surpassed as a military training ground the world over. 

FORTIFICATIONS. 

THE CITADEL, QUEBEC. 

I inspected the fortification--, at Quebec, and No. 1 Fort, at Point Levis, on Sep- 
tembei L3 and 14, last. The Citadel walls were being repaired, but the revetment walls, 
supporting: the glacis, appeared to be crumbling away, and fallng into the ditches in 
many places. If it is the intention of the department to demolish the glacis, it would 
be less unsightly to have the walls torn down and the ditches filled in. partially even, 
and not leave the masonry to fall in of its own accord, as it is now doing. 

The parade gmuncl within the Citadel is in a very rough state and hardly fit to 
drill upon. A small expenditure nf money for levelling and smoothing the surface 
by the lessee villi I make i1 reasonablj g I. 

The neglect by the lessee, of thai historical, time-honoured parade ground, the 
Esplanade, thai no doubl in years long gone by was the Champ de Mars of the brave 
French, and upon which probably everj British regiment has at some time, within 
the la-i one hundred and fifty years, paraded, or may again be paraded, is a decided 
reflection upon those responsibli for its keep. 

Inequalities of ground, cow-paths and weeds being its prominent features, symbols 
of degeneracy, and the loss of national pride. 

The forte, a1 Pointe Levis, app ar to keep in fairly good repair. At the same time, 

periodical painting of woodwork and pointing of the masonry would prove beneficial. 



IXtiPECTOR-GEXERAL, CANADIAN FORCES 49 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

HALIFAX. 

Through the kindness of the General Officer Commanding His Majesty's Forces, I 
had the privilege of visiting the whole of the fortifications not then taken over by the 
Canadian authorities, at Halifax. Repairs were being made at MeNab's island, and 
extensive work was being proceeded with at Sandwich, and, generally speaking, the 
whole system for the defence of Halifax was in the best possible condition. 

MEDICAL SERVICES. 

While these services were admirably carried out in 1904, there was an improvement 
noticeable at my inspection, last year. It was gratifying also to find that several 
recommendations I had made in my report upon the militia, for 1904, had been re- 
cognized, and to a considerable extent, authorized in every instance, which has greatly 
added to the efficiency of the medical corps and the comfort of the patients being 
treated by them in the several camps. 

The new tent issued to this branch of the service has proved a model in every way, 
particularly with regard to the ventilation that appears to be perfect, but, unfortunately, 
so far the issue is quite inadequate for the full requirements of this most important 
service. 



MUSKETRY. 

There does not appear to be any strictly defined musketry system observed or pro- 
vided for. 

At certain stations and camps of instruction excellent rifle ranges are to be found; 
,ii others there are ranges suitable for miniature practice, only; again, at others there 
are no ranges of any description provided, this latter being sometimes hard to under- 
stand, for instance, at Laprairie. in June, last, the 3rd Cavalry Brigade were out for 
the usual twelve days' training and, so far as I can learn, had no musketry training 
of any kind. 

Another phase of the want of system that should be noted and rectified, if a correct 
return or report on the comparative musketry efficiency of the force is desired, is to be 
found in the fact that there do not appear to be any rules laid down by which the actual 
average shooting proficiency of all units, armed with the rifle, can be arrived at, no 
matter whether their respective practices have been carried out with service or with 
miniature ammunition, and that there is no extra compensation to those who are the 
most proficient in the use of the rifle at target practice. 

The firing should in each case, of course, be classified. 

While it must be evident to all concerned that the rank and file are keen for rifle 
practice, there are those of other and higher ranks inclined to minimise its importance, 
and happiest when there is little or none of it. 

I cannot do better than call attention to my report of November 30, 1904, as the 
Officer Commanding the Militia, in relation to this important subject, unless, perhaps, 
we turn back to the General Orders of 1870, thirty-six years ago, where it may be seen 
that liberal pecuniary rewards were granted those members of the militia force who 
became proficient in the use of the rifle under a prescribed musketry system. 

5( HOOL OF Ml SKETBY. 

This very important institution, which may appropriately be designated thd 
'Hythe' of Canada, still keeps up its high reputation for useful work in qualifying 
officers and men of the militia force, and in granting them well-earned certificates, 

35—4 



50 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

but that work is not being taken full advantage of throughout the country, as might 
be done were the services of its graduates systematically enlisted in assisting the units, 
to which they belong in gaining the knowledge of the theory, and the practice of 
musketry. 

SIGNALLING. 

While, practically, in name only a 'corps,' the work accomplished by those engaged 
at signalling, in the several camps, was most satisfactory, the zeal shown by all ranks 
under training in signalling being evident. 

It is expected that the system will have become more perfected before this year's 
annual training takes place, and that then every unit of the active militia will be 
given a chance of securing its quota of qualified signallers. 



GENERAL OBSLRVA1IONS. 

The replacing of the General Officer Commanding by a Militia Council that may 
administer militia affairs, but have no power to command — the executive command 
being vested in officers of the higher commands — has rendered necessary an indepen- 
dent inspection department, of which the Inspector-General is the head, but, as in the 
case of the Militia Council, neither the Inspector-General nor the officers of his de- 
partment or branch have, as inspectors, any executive command. , 

The duties of the Inspector-General have been clearly defined by a general order, 
and he is responsible and subject to the Honourable the Minister in Militia Council. 
' His sole function is to report upon actual facts without expressing opinions upon 
policy.' 

I find, therefore, to be more explicit, that my duties as Inspector-General are 
limited to forming a judgment, either personally or through the staff allotted to me, 
upon the efficiency of the officers and men, on the handling of troops, on the standard 
and system of training, on the suitability of the equipment, and. practically, as I take 
it, on all that affects the readiness of the forces for war; and, furthermore, to report 
thereon. I have, therefore, endeavoured to convey to you, sir, and the Militia Council 
as concisely as possible in the foregoing pages, my impressions and conclusions, ar- 
rived at after my first year's experience as Inspector-General. 

This report misrht better, perhaps, have taken a different form, but I thought it 
well, for this year, to adhere to the custom long in vogue, and have my remarks follow 
in the order of precedence of corps, and, with regard to general subjects, in the order 
of their importance. 

It is accepted as a military axiom that perfect organization, thorough discipline 
and accurate gun and rifle practice are the chief essentials necessary for the sound 
establishment and insurance of a reliable military force. It, therefore, does not 
require to be pointed out how especially necessary it is that the limited Canadian 
force, extending over an exceptionally extensive area, should be perfect and complete 
in these particulars. 

With regard i" the discipline of the force, reliance must be placed more upon the 
training the personnel receive at their homes, and at the public schools they attend. 
than upon the annua] twelve days' military training they receive. It can, however, be 
truthfully affirmed that Canadian troops serving on Canadian soil hnvo ever been 
amenable to discipline, sometimes of a severe order. 

My remarks upon gun and rifle practice cannot be further extended more than 
to add that I loam that greater efforts will be put forward, this year, to improve this 
important branch of training. 



inspector-general, canadian forces 51 

se:sional paper no. 35 

The substitution of a Militia Council for a General Officer Commanding lias 
happily brought about a greatly to be desired attempt at decentralization, but, so far 
as I can learn, the departure remains more a theory than a reality, the outside force 
being, as in the past, to too great an extent dry-nursed from headquarters, and instead 
of officers commanding the higher commands, officers commanding districts, or those 
commanding units of the permanent corps being obliged to rely absolutely upon thern- 
6th en and upon their own judgment in matters of importance, they are inclined, 
partly from force of habit, to rely upon the staff at headquarters, who are already 
burdened with all their official shoulders can reasonably be expected to bear. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, your obedient servant, 

AYLMEE, Brigadier-General. 

Inspector-General. 



?,-,— U 



52 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



APPENDIX II. 

From the Director-General of Medical Services, 
Ottawa. 

To the Adjutant-General, 
Canadian Militia. 

Headquarters, 
Ottawa, December 15, 1905. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report on the medical services for the year ending 
December 31, 1905, as follows: — 

MEDICAL INSPECTIONS. 

Owing to the impossibility of my personally inspecting all camps, the technical 
inspections of units of the Army Medical Corps and Regimental Medical Services 
were performed by the principal medical officers of command staffs as follows:— 

Western Ontario Command. — Lieut.-colonel W. Nattress, P.A.M.C., London 
divisional camps. 

Quebec Command. — Limit. -colonel A. X. Worthington, A.M.C., Laprairie and 
Three Rivers camps. 

Maritime Provinces Command. — Lieut. -colonel G. C. Jones, P.A.M.C., Sussex. 
Aldershot and Charlottetown divisional camps, Fredericton station hospital. 

I personally inspected, on the dates shown, the undermentioned camps and station 
hospitals : — 

I.' union camp June 16 

Niagara " " 19 

Ottawa - " 21 

Levis '• - 23 

Kingston " " 30 

Toronto station hospital " 15 

London " " "1''. 

Quebec 26 

St. Jean " - "28 

Kingston and Royal Military College station hospital. July 1 

Reports on the deficiencies of the different units of the Army Medical Corps and 
the regimental bearer section have been forwarded, by the above named officers, to 
the Inspector-General, and the sanitary and general reports i" the Director-General 
of Medical Services, in accordance with instructions. The following comments on 
these reports arc submitted. 

LATRINES. 

Tlii* dry-earth system was again used lasl year, but nay recommendation oi 
septic-tank system has been adopted for the proposed central camp at Petawawa. I 
have no doubt but that it will prove very satisfactory. 



DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF MEDICAL FORCES 53 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

I would, however, strongly recommend that the pan system of latrines proposed 
by the Director of Engineer Services be tried next year, and that wooden buildings 
having at the top ample ventilation, be used at all other than permanent camps. 

I would also recommend that the chloride of lime, used as a disinfectant mixed 
with dry sand, be supplied at a maximum quantity of 800 pounds for each camp. 

KEFUSE PITS. 

The trench system proposed in my last year's report was tried at two of the most 
important camps, Niagara and Levis, with the most satisfactory results. These two 
camps were certainly models of good and perfect sanitary camps. I strongly re- 
commend that instructions be given to the Army Service Corps, to issue at camp, 
wooden boxes 2x2 feet in order to permit of the establishment of such kitchen trench 
pits. The expense would be largely compensated for by the -improved general appear- 
ance of the camp, the perfect sanitation and the exemption from flies plague. 

UNITS OF THE AEMY MEDICAL CORPS. 

In order to place the units of the Army Medical Corps on an equal footing with 
the Royal Army Medical Corps, I propose submitting, in the near future, a re-organ- 
ization of the units of the Canadian Army Medical Corps. The present system of 
division of field hospitals and bearer companies does not meet with the requirements 
of the militia. Units have to be divided into sections in order to provide for a tem- 
porary field hospital for each camp. This is detrimental to the service in general. It 
is my intention to recommend the organization of eighteen field ambulance units in 
place of the eighteen bearer companies and field hospitals already existing. When 
these ambulance units are completed and provided with hospital section, bearer sec- 
tion and transport section, the department will bo enabled to detail any one of them 
for service as required. As this system will be only a reorganization of the present 
one, the equipment will be practically the same. All units of the Army Medical 
Corps have had, during the year, twelve days' training in camp. This was most 
beneficial, and I have no hesitation in stating that the work done, the standard of 
men enlisted, the equipment and the hospital management, have been most satisfactory, 
and reflect credit on the corps. 

EQUIPMENT. 

A complete set of new tents, disinfecting tanks, refrigerators, acetylene appara- 
tus and stretcher baths were issued to the Army Medical Corps units during the 
year. 

The ventilation of the tents was a great improvement compared with past 
models. The Army Medical Corps bell tent is provided with three large ventilators 
at the top and one above the door, which provide for perfect ventilation above the 
occupant's head, and cause more than three degrees difference in temperature from 
the ordinary bell tent. I would, therefore, strongly recommend the adoption of such 
ventilators for the ordinary bell tent made for the militia. 

REGIMENTAL MEDICAL SERVICES 

The recommendations contained in my last year's report have been all carried out. 
As the schedule of equipment for the medical service has been approved, the formation 
of a bearer section for each rural regiment should now be authorized. Two men per 



54 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

company would be detailed to act as stretcher bearers during the camp, under the 
orders of the regimental medical officers, and stretchers (4 for regiments of 8 com- 
panies ; 2 for regiments of 4 companies) would be issued during the camp from local 
stores. The principal medical officers would requisition for them before camp, so that 
provision for them might be made by the ordnance stores. The formation of such a 
stretcher section would be most beneficial to the militia, and would complete the 
organization of each regiment. 

CAMP SITES. 

The principal medical officer for the Quebec command reported that the camp 
site at Laprairie is very defective. The ground is low and the clay composition of 
the soil does not afford any possible means of absorption. Consequently the latrines, 
kitchen pits, and, during rainy weather, the camp ground itself, become very muddy, 
wet and unhealthy. It would be advisable to choose another camp site, or to hold 
the camp at Three Rivers, where the camp ground is perfect. 

The Kingston camp grounds were also badly chosen. The rocky formation of 
the ground, covered with clay and very little sand, prevents the absorption of liquid, 
and causes overflow of latrines, kitchen pits, &c. The tents should be pitched on the 
lower plateau, or farther up on the hill, where good absorbing ground is available. 

PERMANENT ARMY MEDICAL CORPS. 

The different detachments of the Permanent Army Medical Corps have been 
completed, with great benefit to the service. I strongly recommend that the station 
hospital repairs, so urgently needed at Kingston and Toronto, be made at an early 
date, if the new barracks and hospitals are not to be constructed in the near future. 



GENERAL HEALTH OF TROOPS. 

The following returns show : — 

(a) The number of patients treated in station hospitals at permanent stations. 

(b) The number of patients treated in field hospitals during the camps. 

This report shows that the health of the troops in camp and at permanent sta- 
tions has been very good. The great precaution taken to avoid the spreading of 
contagious diseases has prevented any epidemic. 

Two cases of smallpox occurred, one in London, the other at Rockliffe camp. 
Both cases were isolated and the patients transferred to the city isolation hospital?. 
The tents, clothing and equipment were disinfected on the grounds, with the disin- 
fecting tank supplied to field hospitals instead of being destroyed as was done on 
previous occasions. 



DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF MEDICAL FORCES 55 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

Statistical Record. 

Abstract from Admission and Discharge Book. Cases treated in Station Hospitala 
from January 1, 1905, to November 30, 1905. 



Disease. 


R.M.C. 


R.C.M.R. 


R.C.H.A. 


R.C.G.A. 


No. 1 No. 2 
Dep6t. Depot 


No. 3 
Depot 


No. 4 

Depot 




1 


2 


S 


10 


1 s 


3 
3 


1 


















9 

1 
7 
1 













1 
1 














4 


2 




1 












1 


















1 






1 
8 


1 




1 

12 

7 


"3 ' 

2 
16 






10 
3 
9 




Boils 




2 




2 
2 




4 
3 

1 


3 
4 


2 




3 
1 


1 


Bubo 














7 












1 


38 
1 
6 
5 
8 


























2 


























Colic 


2 



11 
20 

2 

1 


2 


1 
16 






1 


Colds 


7 


8 
4 


11 






11 
3 


17 

1 








1 




3 








I 








6 


4 






2 






1 
















1 






















2 


















1 




4 
1 


1 


6 


20 


14 
2 


1 




2 








1 


1 

1 
2 














5 




2 


3 




















1 
4 




1 






..... 


1 

1 


2 








1 
1 






















1 





















4 






2 
1 
























1 


2 










1 


9 


















1 










1 












" typhoid 


1 


1 


3 

4 
1 
1 


1 
1 


13 


1 


2 














1 
2 








4 
4 






3 


1 














2 


9 
3 

73 






6 


5 


















3 


14 
1 


4 

1 


24 


3 


3 


Gleet 












i' 

1 
























Gout 












1 
3 
1 










1 


2 
2 


3 












. 






1 




















1 


1 
1 
1 












1 
11 

2 
55 

6 


2 










1 
















Influenza 

Indigestion 


40 
5 


14 


19 


4 


73 




16 



56 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

Statistical Eecoed. 

Abstract from Admission and Discharge Book. Cases treated in Station Hospitals 
from January 1. 1905, to ^November 30. 1905 — Con. 



Disease. 


R.M.C. 


R.C.M.R. 


R.C.H.A. 


R.C.G.A. 


Xo. 1 
Depot : 


Xo. 2 
Depot . 


Xo. 3 Xo. 4 
Depdt. Depot. 








3 


2 
2 


































1 
1 






























3 












1 
2 








:::::::: 


1 


2 
3 


6 




1 


1 




15 
6 


16 


















1 




















2 






1 










1 
















1 
1 








1 


3 
3 


3 




8 


1 


















3 








1 


3 
2 


4 




1 


1 


















12 
















1 






1 
















1 
7 


1 


1 
1 
















12 


1 








1 










2 

1 
1 


1 




1 


































2 
1 
1 




1 
1 






3 




1 


16 


12 


11 


3 


4 














1 










1 
1 












1 


5 


1 
2 


1 
31 
10 

4 


4 

1 
I 














5 




2 








26 






it 

1 


7 
17 






1 




n 


18 


6 
















1 
9 


1 


1 
3 

1 
30 

■_• 
2 












3 






Shock 












19 




13 


16 

4 
1 


2 
1 


in 

1 




















i 
l 

17 


2 






Whitlow . 












22 


IS 


7 


2 


24 


3 


13 






Totals 


146 
6 


162 

1 
o 

1 
8 


1(13 
2 


429 

27 
2 


115 


301 

2 

1 

'J 
5 


101 

2 
2 

5 

( 


123 




1 


I lii-il 




I >i-rharged by medical 




1 

7 








21 


3 










ad totals 


152 


174 


203 


479 


118 


311 


114 


124 



DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF MEDICAL FORCES 57 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

Statistical Eecord. 

Abstract from Admission and Discharge Book. Cases treated in Field Hospitals 
at Divisional Camps, 1905. 



Diseases. 


0. 

§ 

03 

o 

> 

3 

d 


0, 

a 
O 

> 

6 


A 

£ 

03 

U 

> 

Q 

n 
6 
Z 


A 

1 
o 

> 

d 


£ 
E 

03 
O 

> 

5 

113 

d 

Z 


£ 


- 
o 

> 

- 

CO 
3 

S5 


A 

I 

03 

o 
> 

3 
t^ 

d 


No. 8 Div. Camp. 


A 

S 

03 

> 

5 

a 

d 


= 
1 

2 




< 






1 
7 
1 
1 
1 










3 


1 
12 










1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 
















1 

1 . . 










1 








1 




2 . 














1 
























6 








1 
2 
1 
1 
3 


2 


2 












i 


Blood-poison 

Boils 
















1 

1 


2 

1 












i 




1 


1 






3 








6 










i 


Bubo 


















Cellulitis 


3 








1 














1 






10 




2 




Colic 


1 


8 


4 








2 


Collapse, diarrhcea. 


1 
















Congestion of liver.. . 


1 


















3 


1 

1 1 




2 


2 

1 


2 
5 

8 






1 




7 




4 




1 










1 
















1 










1 










:::::: :::::: 


1 


Debility 






















4 


6 
3 


2 

1 
1 


1 


3 


7 


7 


3 


2 


3 





























Dysentery 


1 








4 










2 

1 


































1 








1 






1 




17 

1 










1 

1 
1 






1 2 












I 
2 





















1 










1 












1 




















10 










Felon 


1 






























1 1 
13 


1 
24 


2 
3 




















1 


22 
2 

1 






3 




2 














6 




1 


1 








2 


1 






























1 
1 




1 










Heat prostration . . 


h 
















2 


1 


1 


1 














4 


3 






4 












1 

1 




































17 






















1 























10 




















1 








1 


2 




1 










1 










1 


1 








2 

1 




1 


1 


















Neuralgia 

Orchitis 




1 
1 




1 




1 
1 








1 








1 




Palpitation 


1 











58 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
Statistical Eecord. 

Abstract from Admission and Discharge Book. Cases treated in Field Hospitals 
at Divisional Camps, 1905 — Con. 



Diseases. 



Pediculus 

Phlegmasis of cheek 
Phlegmasis of finger . 
Phlegmasis of feet . 

Pleurisy 

Pleurodyrus 

Renal colic 

Rheumatism 

Ring-worm 

Scabies 

Scalds 

Smallpox 

Sore feet 

Syncope 

Synovitis 

Sprains 

Sunstroke 

Stomatitis 

Tonsilitis 

Tuberculosis 

Typhoid pneumonia. 

Varicose ulcer 

Whitlow 

Wounds 

Wounds, gun-shot. . . 
Transferred to civil 

hospitals 

Deaths 



Total cases . 



3 



o 
Z 



66 



s 



1 

10 



> 

S 

CO 



D. 


Q. 


1 


1 


o 


a 


> 


> 






Q 


Q 


■tf 


lO 


o 





Z 


Z 



Q 

ID 



O 

Z 



17 

8 



13 

1 



129 



50 



39 



24 



60 



- 

a 

3 
O 

> 

a 



ii 



115 



D 


O 


> 

a 


> 

s 


00 


0> 



I 



o 
Z 



66 



28 



o. 

S 

OS 

o 

S 



o 

Z 



It 



< 



41 



DENTAL CASES. 







7 




\ 






3 


































2 












12 






12 












8 


6 
10 






















2 
IS 




















2 












3 

5 

11 






















4 






































2 










































46 


as 






25 


14 





























Grand totals . . . 


66 


175 


50 


74 


24 


60 140 


80 


27 


14 


42 



I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



EUG. FISET, Colonel, 
Director-General of Medical Service. 



ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 59 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 



APPENDIX in. 

Kingston, January 1, 1906. 

To the President 

Of the Royal Military College, Canada. 

Sir, — I have the honour to forward my report on the Royal Military College for 
the year ending December 31, 1905. 

STRENGTH. 

At the beginning of the year there were 96 gentlemen cadets. During the year 
this number was altered as follows: — 

Commissioned in Imperial forces 3 

Commissioned in the permanent forces (of these, 7 were from 

the 2nd class) 14 

Commissioned in reserve of officers 17 

Withdrawn for various causes 1 

• 

Total decrease 41 

Twenty-seven gentlemen cadets joined in September, 1905. These changes leave a 
present strength of 82 gentlemen cadets. 

CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE. 
The conduct and discipline of the gentlemen cadets have been good. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

The results of the midsummer examinations have been good, and in the case of 
the 1st class, particularly so. 

As suggested by the late commandant, two professors are now employed for 
' Physics ' and ' Civil Surveying ' with good results, but owing to the size of the 
classes I have recommended an increase in the number of instructors from two to four, 
as at present it is impossible to fully carry out that individual instruction which is so 
desirable a feature of the work at the Royal Military College. 

DRILLS AND EXERCISES. 

A good standard has been maintained in drills and exercises. 

The cadets were again prevented from going into camp for gun practice. If my 
proposal to take the cadets into camp for about four weeks in the summer be approved 
there will be opportunity for much useful practical work. 

The excellent work carried out in the gymnasium shows how much a well appointed 
building, as this is, leads to improved work being done. 



60 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

Great interest has been, taken in musketry, and I have pleasure in notifying that 
the government of the Province of Ontario has again presented the college with the 
sum of $100, showing that the advantages of the Royal Military College, and the im- 
portance of rifle- -hooting, are fully recognized by the people of Ontario. 



OFFICERS' LONG COURSE. 

Two long courses of instruction have been held during the year, from March to 
May, and from October to December, respectively. 

Twenty-four officers attended, of whom twenty obtained 1st class certificates. In 
addition, eleven officers of the permanent corps attended the courses in order to prepare 
for their promotion examinations. 



NEW BUILDINGS. 

The construction of new servants" quarters, quarters for the riding-establishment, 
and the new drill hall (available for skating), will, I hope, be soon begun. These are 
urgently required. 



RETIRING MEMBERS OF THE STAFF. 

During the year the following members of the staff have left the Royal Military 
College : — 

Colonel R. N. R. Reade, Commandant. 

Major Buchanan-Dunlop, R.A. 

Major Hewett, Royal West Kent Regiment. 

And I regret to have to record the death of Captain Chartrand, Professor of French. 



COMMISSIONS. 

The following gentlemen obtained commissions: — 

E. J. C. Schmidlin, Royal Engineers. 

H. Holmes, Royal Garrison Artillery. 

A. H. Jukes, Indian Army. 

Le Roy Grant, Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. 

W. G. Beeman, Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. 

C. F. Constantine, Royal Canadian Ibn-sr Artillery. 

W. H. P. Elkins, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. 

G. St. A. Perrin, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. 

S. G. Bacon, Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. 

A. E. Harris, Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. 

E. B. Irving, Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. 

H. E. Boak, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. 

A. D. Irwin, Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. 

I.. W. Cockburn, Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. 

A. S. Wright, Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery. 



ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 61 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

DIPLOMAS OF GRADUATION. 

Diplomas of graduation have been awarded the following gentlemen cadets of the 
first-class : — 

B. S. II. Schmidlin (honours), Sergeant MePhee (honours), Sergeant Smith 
(honours), Corporal Watts (honours), C. S. M. Grant (honours), Sergeant Ferrin, 
C. S. M. Constantine. Corporal Wright. Sergeant Hammond, Corporal Elkins. Cadet 
Mathieson, Cadet Jukes, Sergeant Harrington, Sergeant Maeklem, Cadet Loggie. C. S. 
M. Gill, C. S. M. Ross. Cadet Hall. Sergeant Goldie, Sergeant Gillies, Cadet Beeman, 
Corporal Holmes, Cadet Starr. Cadet Girouard, Corporal Canfield, Corporal Curry. 

AXXFAI. PRTZES. 

The College prizes awarded during the year have been won as follows : — 

Gold Medal, B. S. M, Schmidlin. 

Silver Medal, Sergeant MePhee. 

Bronze Medal, Sergeant Smith. 

The Sword of Honour prize for conduct, drills and exercises, B. S. M. Schmidlin. 

Class prizes for the highest number of marks in each class : — 

1st class, B. S. M. Schmidlin. 

2nd class, Gentleman Cadet Gemmill. 

3rd class, Gentleman Cadet Rhodes. 

Subject prizes for the highest number of marks in the several subjects: — 

In the 1st class B. S. M. Schmidlin won the Sword of Honour for conduct, drills 
and exercises, and the prizes for military engineering, civil surveying, drills and exer- 
cises, and Sergeant MePhee won the prize for tactics, reconnaissance and conduct. 

In the 2nd class Corporal (Jemmill won the prize for mathematics, engineering, 
drawing and military surveying, Gentleman Cadet Macrae the prizes for artillery and 
military administration. Gentleman Cadet Budden the prize for French, Gentleman 
Cadets Budden and Gemmill are equal for the English prize. 

In the 3rd class Gentleman Cadet Hammond won the prize for French and Gentle- 
man Cadets Rhodes and Cowley were equal for the English prize. 

The Dominion Artillery Association prizes were won by Sergeant MePhee and 
C. S. M. Grant. 

The Commandant"s musketry prize, young soldiers* course, by Gmtleman Cadet 
Rhodes. 

The Dundonald Mounted Patrol Competition was won by B Company (Sergeant 
Harrington, Sergeant MePhee, Cadet Hall. Corporal Canfield). 

I have the honour to be. sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. T. TAYLOR. Lt.-eol., 

' \ /.'. M. College 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA. AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 



APPENDIX IV. 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF THE DOMINION ARSENAL. 

Quebec, November 28, 1905. 
To the Honourable 

The Minister of Militia and Defence. 

Sir, — I have the honour to report as follows upon the operations of this estab- 
lishment for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. 

CARTRIDGE FACTORY. 

The output this year, the largest since the factory has been in operation, has 
been productive of very satisfactory administrative results. As is well known, it is 
easier to control manufacture on a large scale than with small production. We now 
have a complete staff of trained hands, and the quantity of work admits of each in- 
dividual being continuously employed on one operation or class of work, resulting in, 
increased skill and facility of production. 

■ A special lot of cartridges, loaded from one batch of cordite, was manufactured 
specially for the annual matches of the Dominion Rifle Association, and it appears, 
on the whole, to have given satisfaction. 

In every country, match ammunition is made with much greater attention to 
minute details than service ammunition; its cost is thereby very greatly increased, 
while the difference in accuracy is exceedingly small, and obtained at the risk of de- 
veloping dangerous pressures in the chamber. 

Some minor complaints were received which, with one exception, may be passed 
over. 

A misapprehension gave rise to the belief, among many competitors, that the 
bullets varied greatly in diameter, and in consequence, those that were considered 
too small, or ' low ' in diameter, were rejected. The method of gauging which the 
riflemen adopted was to place the bullet in the muzzle of the rifle, retaining those 
only that appear* <1 t i be uniform. 

The reason for the different sizes is that the insertion of the bullet into the case 
varies slightly within definite manufacturing limits. As the point of the bullet is 
tapered, it follows that the diameter will decrease with the amount of insertion and 
vice versa. 

Th? cylindrical portii n of the bullet which seals the escape of the gas and takes 
the rifling, lie- within the cartridge case, and is therefore inaccessible without ex- 
tracting the bullet. All "303 service bullets arc manufactured within limits that 
vary by only plus "r minus one thousandth of an inch. 

It may be woll to state that the human eye is incapable of appreciating such 
minute dimensions, and they are measurable only with the aid of a micrometer. The 
cartridges in question were up to the standard of the War Office specifications gov- 
erning the manufacture of ammunition for the Imperial service, and may therefore 
be con-id rel as suitable for purposes of military training and defence. 

The manufacture of Mark I., gallery-practice cartridges, loaded with black 
powder, has been discontinued, and after prolonged trials, a cartridge firing smokeless 
powder, with a bullet of new pattern, has been designed. The accuracy of this cart- 
ridge is greatly superior to that of Mark T. An improved machine has been designed 



DOMINION ARSENAL 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

for extracting percussion c;\ps by hydraulic pressure, which will greatly reduce the 
cost of a hitherto troublesome- operation. This, together with other improvements in 
manufacture, will permit of the production of this cartridge at lower cost than Mark 
I., notwithstanding the greater expense of using smokeless powder. 

By far the most important work undertaken during the year, has been a study 
of the methods of annealing brass and cupro-nickel, together with the micro-structure 
of copper alloys, subjected to heat treatment. A muffled furnace, built after an Eng- 
lish des'gn, for use with soft coal, entailed an enormous expenditure of fuel, and 
could not be operated to give uniform results; as neither gas nor oil was available, 
coke was used. To economize fuel the muffle was discarded, and a furnace was 
especially designed, embodying the main features of gas, or oil-fired, furnaces. 

The experiment involve! a certain risk, but after six months continuous opera- 
tion, it may be claimed that the results, both as regards cost and quality of work, 
have far exceeded expectations. To control the temperature of this furnace, a 
Uehling-Steinbart pneumatic recording pyrometer has been purchased. This in- 
strum nt furnishes a continuous record of temperature and time of annealing, in the 
form of a chart, which is examined daily for the regulation of subsequent processes. 

'Ihe results obtained have been highly satisfactory, and not a single batch of brass 
has been over-anneal d since it was taken into use. As each furnace load is worth 
about $200 and some thousands of annealings are made during the year, the saving 
effected by this means is very considerable. The usual method of judging hiarh tem- 
peratures is to observe the colour of the furnace and metal under treatment. 

A comparison of colours with instrumental records, leads to the conclusion that a 
trained observer will make errors amounting to 200° C, and that consequently such a 
method is absolutely worthless. 

In many works annealing is performed under the supervision of labourers of ex- 
perience, who, after long service are rated as so-called experts. The disadvantage of 
placing in the hands of labourers processes affecting the character of the entire output 
is evident, and the instrument referred to dispenses entirely with such experts. 

In consequence of these changes, burst cartridge cases, which formerly caused so 
much trouble, are now exceptional ; only three or four having occurred during the past 
six months. While the process of annealing metal in the form of strip may be con- 
sidered satisfactory, that employed for cases between drawing operations is only fairly 
so, and the best results obtainable will only be got by the construction of a gas plant. 

The rolling mill is now in full operation, and the increased demands for ammuni- 
tion will insure that this portion of the plant is kept continuously employed. Experi- 
ments have been made with a view to removing metallic fouling which accumulates in 
the bore of rifles firing bullets with hard metal envelopes, such as the service bullet, 
with satisfactory results. The regulation method is to use a wire pull-through, which 
virtually files away the accumulated metal, at the same time subjecting the bore to 
unnecessary wear. Various secret mixtures are on the market for this purpose. 

SHELL FACTORY. 

The shell factory has been continuously employed in the manufacture of 12-pr. 
B. L. shrapnel shells. The advent of high speed steels has made it possible to greatly 
ri duce the cost of manufacturing these projectiles. The manufacture of forged steel 
bodies was started witli 4-inch round steel, necessitating five forging operations and 
three heats; this has been replaced by employing 3J-inch steel, by which bodies are 
forged in two operations and one heat. 

The cost of production will be reduced in proportion. The bodies of these shells 
an' now finished on turret lathes, at a speed that compares very favourably with what 
has been seen elsewhere, but orders have been placed for automatic machines, which are 
guaranteed to greatly reduce time and cost of manufacture. These machines are 
expected daily, and will be put into operation as soon as received. 



64 DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

Several minor improvements have been made in machining operations, among 
which may be mentioned the entire elimination of drilling, which has been replaced by 
punching on all operations but one ; the saving from this will be considerable. 

A machine has been built for forming shrapnel bullets, which were formerly cast 
in moulds. The new machine cuts the bullets from lead rod, squirted in the usual 
manner, and presses them to the required shape. The bullet produced is perfect in 
form, regular in weight, and requires no subsequent drumming, as was the case with 
cast bullets. 

ARTILLERY WORKSHOP. 

All repairs to machinery, tools and equipment have been carried out in this de- 
partment. The manufacture of boxes, rifle chests and tin work has proceeded as usual. 
It is now quite clear that the plant could not be operated without the assistance derived 
from this workshop, and as doubts as to its necessity at one time existed, it will be 
gratifying to know that the expenditure incurred has been expended to the best ad- 
vantage. Additional crucible furnaces are being built in the iron foundry, the existing 
furnaces being insufficient. As soon as they are completed a full staff of men will be 
engaged. 

ADDITIONS TO PLANT. 

The following machinery has been purchased during the year: — 
1 Bar shearing machine. 
1 Drill grinder. 
. 1 4J-inch cutting-off machine. 
1 Moulding machine. 
1 Bar folder. . 

1 Uehling-Stembart, pneumatic recording pyrometer. 

Necessary purchase of loose tools, for additions and replacements were made as 
usual. 

GENERAL. 

The additional work now carried on at the Arsenal has necessitated a large in- 
crease in the quantity of raw material to be kept on hand. The storage room available 
is entirely inadequate, necessitating our stocking materials in the open that should 
be under cover. Owing to circumstances beyond our control, the store building asked 
for three years ago has not yet been erected. 

The equipment of machine tools in the workshop and tool room is insufficient for 
present requirements, causing serious delays in the execution of important work. It 
is hoped thai provision will be made in the estimates for the ensuing fiscal year for the 
purchase of necessary machines. 

The chemisl has been kept constantly employed in testing materials and con- 
trolling the quality of the output during manufacture. Most valuable work has be n 
performed, and ii is fell that the high standard called Eor by the official specifica- 
tions lias been fully maintained. 

A properlj equipped draughting office in charge of a competent designer is much 
required. At the present time much work is done from rough sketches, made by the 

foreman or anyone who can spare the time. This method results in much unauthor- 
ized work being done and it is wasteful in tin- extreme. Alterations are being made 
in our system of book-keeping, with a view to assimilating our figures as closely as 
po sible with those of the Royal Ordnance factories. It i^ considered of importance 
that the department should have i urate information a- to the relative cost of manu- 
facturing locally and of importing from abroad. It ha- been invariably found, when 



DOMINION ARSENAL 65 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35 

the quantity of article- has been sufficiently large, tihal it is to the advantage of the 
government to manufacture locally. 

Important extensions to the Arsenal are under consideration for next year, which 
will enable the department to spend for the benefit of our own work-people, money 
hitherto expended abroad, in addition to strengthening our military position by 
making us less dependent on outside sources of supply. 

I take pleasure in expressing my appreciation of the fidelity and efficiency which 
has characterized the service of the staff during the year. 

Following is a statement of ammunition manufactured during the year : 

Caps, percussion, -303" 3,000 

Cartridges, S. A. ball, -303", gallery practice 1,000,000 

" S. A. ball, -303", cordite, mark VI . 8,143,300 

S. A. blank, -303", black powder, mark II., 

converted 156,000 

B. L. 15 or 12-pr. 1J lbs., blank, filling 2,000 

" B. L. :5" gun or howitzer, 3 lbs., blank, filling. 22<> 

B. L. empty, 15 or 12-pr. 1^ lbs., blank.. .. 5,000 

S. B. empty, 24-pr. 3 lbs., blank 3.000 

Q. F. 12-pr. 12-cwt. cases, empty, rectifying 

and cleaning 1,320 

" B. L. filled 12-pr. 6 cwt., cordite mark II. . . . f,480 

Covers, cartridge, canvas, B. L. 12-pr. 6 cwt., mark I.... 3,200 

In addition to ammunition manufactured as above, large numbers of ammuni- 
tion boxes and other stores were manufactured, and many cartridges, limbers and 
other articles were altered or repaired. 

I have the honour to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant. 

( Sgd.) F. M. GAUDET, Lt.-col. 

Superintendent Dominion Ars nal. 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a 



A. 1906 



ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS 



1906 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTERITO THE KINO'S MOST 

EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1906 

[No. 35a- 1906.] 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a A. 1906 



.REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS 

ASSEMBLED AT THE ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE, KINGSTON. ONT., 
ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1906, AT 2.30 P.M. 



PRESENT : 

M-ajor-General P. H. N. Lake, C.B., C.M.G. (Chairman), Chief of the General 
Staff. 

Brigadier-General W. D. Otter, C.B., A.D.C., Commanding Western Ontario. 

Major H. A. Panet, D.S.O., Royal Canadian Artillery, Assistant- Adjutant-General 
at Headquarters. 

The Hon. Mr. Justice W. P. R. Street, LL.B.. Member of Senate, Toronto 
University. 

Monsignor O. E. Mathieu, C.M.G., Rector of Laval University. 
Acting Secretary. Major C. F. Winter. ' The Governor General's Foot Guards.' 
Lieutenant-Colonel E. T. Taylor, Commandant of the Royal Military College, in 
attendance. 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE AND COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

1. The board first proceeded to consider the conditions of admission to the college 
and the course of instruction thereat. 

Lieut.-Colonel Taylor was requested to raise before the board any question in 
connection with either, which in his opinion might usefully be discussed. 

eligibility of candidates. 

2. In connection with the eligibility of candidates, he submitted to the board that 
paragraph 7, of the regulations for the Royal Military College, as now worded, tended 
to exclude candidates who, in his view, were in every way desirable; for, under that 
paragraph, the sons of graduates of the Royal Military College who were serving in 
the Imperial Army were often ineligible, they or their parents not having resided in 
Canada for the two years immediately preceding the date of examination. The board 
concurred and suggest the following for insertion as sub-paragraph 7 (a) : 

' In the case of applicants whose fathers are graduates of the college and are in 
the military service of the Empire, it shall not be necessary that the two years residence 
shall have immediately preceded the date of examination.' 

preference to sons of militia officers. 

3. Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor then raised the question whether, in view of the mili- 
tary nature and origin of the Royal Military College and in order to maintain this 

35a— 1* 



4 ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

characteristic, some preference, in the forni of a reduction in the fees of the college, 
either upon the entrance or during the course, might not be given to the sons of officers 
who had served in the militia. 

The board recommend for the favourable consideration of the Honourable the 
Minister, that some reduction in the charges for tuition and maintenance might with 
advantage be made to candidates, the sons of officers of not less than twenty years' 
8«rvice in the militia. This term would ensure that any officer who claimed the privi- 
lege had rendered good service to the country. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION — MATHEMATICS. 

4. In connection with the entrance examination, Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor sug- 
gested that the minimum number of marks required for qualification in mathematics 
might be amended. The subject of mathematics is divided into four sections, arith- 
metic, algebra, euclid and trigonometry, to each of which 750 marks are allotted, mak- 
ing a total of 3,000. Qualification in each section is not necessary; 750 marks, or 25 
per cent of the total marks are sufficient. He pointed out that this arrangement en- 
abled some candidates to ignore altogether one or more of the four subjects and yet to 
qualify. He recommended that the minimum qualification should be exacteJ for each 
separate section of the subject, instead of for the whole only, as at present. In this 
the board concur. 

5. It was also agreed that the same principle ought to be applied to other subjects 
which are divided into sections, such as English, geography, history and French. 

6. Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor expressed a doubt whether 25 per cent did not re- 
present too low a standard of qualification in mathematics. The board, while con- 
curring in this view, incline to the opinion that the range of subjects included in the 
syllabus of examination for mathematics is unnecessarily extensive, and tends to en- 
courage candidates to present themselves with merely a smattering or ' cram ' know- 
ledge of the subject. The range of the examination is certainly wider than that usually 
required for matriculation at the majority of Canadian universities, although, by para- 
graph 14 of the Royal Military College Regulations, it is permissible for matriculants 
of one of these universities to be admitted without examination. The board consider 
that it would be preferable to confine the scope of the examination within the limits 
required for matriculation at the universities referred to, but at the same time to re- 
quire a much more thorough grounding in those subjects and a much higBer minimum 
of marks for qualification. They held the opinion that it would be easier to carry out 
the syllabus of mathematics laid down 'for the college course with candidates who were 
sound as regards elementary knowledge, than with those who had tried to learn more 
but were not so thoroughly grounded. Were this view accepted, they would recom- 
mend, for adoption, at least the qualifying minimum proposed by the commandant, 
of 33 per cent in each section of the subject and 40 per cent on the subject as a whole. 

ENGLISH AND FRENCH. 

7. The board and the Commandant were agreed in considering that the important 
subjects of English and French did not receive the attention which was desirable, but 
in view of the shortness of the college course, it appeared scarcely practicable to allot 
additional time to these two subjects during the course. 

8. It was, however, thought that, as a correct knowledge of one's own language 
must be an essential element in any sound education, candidates at entrance might 
fairly be required to show a much more thorough acquaintance, each with his own 
language, in grammar, orthography and composition than was demanded at present, 
and that good handwriting should receive special marks. This principle should be 
applied equally to English and French-speaking candidates. The board recommend 
this proposal for adoption, without, however, suggesting any reduction of the time at 
present allotted to English and French during the course. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS 5 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a 

DURATION OF COURSE. 

9. The Commandant represented that there was a very general feeling among the 
professors, which he himself shared, in favour of reverting to a four-years' course, 
instead of the three-years course adopted in 1896. The professors did not feel that 
they could do full justice in a three years course to the subjects which they were 
required to teach according to the syllabus. He himself had doubts whether sufficient 
time and attention were given to the military subjects, for instruction in which the 
college primarily existed, and yet he felt that if the present standard in the subjects 
of civil engineering and surveying was to be maintained, it was hardly possibjle to 
spare more time for military subjects, unless the course was extended. Closely allied 
with this preference for a four years course was, he admitted, the widespread desire of 
graduates and professors of the college that the course in civil engineering and survey- 
ing at the college should be such as to complete a graduate's education in those sub- 
jects, and to render it unnecessary for him to take a course therein at a university 
afterwards. The diploma of graduation would then, it was hoped, be accepted by the 
Canadian Society of Civil Engineers for admission to that body. 

10. The board regard it as evident that a four years course could be made more 
thorough and satisfactory from all educational points of view than a three years 
course, but feel that there is some room for doubt as to the attitude of parents and 
guardians towards such a change. The main disadvantage of the four years course 
from their standpoint, no doubt, is the consequent postponement of the time at which 
the graduate could enter a profession. The expense of the additional year at the 
college is perhaps a matter of less importance now than it may have been when the 
change from four years to three was made. It would be well to try and ascertain 
the feelings of parents on this subject, by consulting those who now have sons at the 
College, before deciding upon any change. This the Commandant undertook to do. 
A subsidiary consideration is the probable attitude towards the proposal of existing 
universities. The college at present does not compete with them but with a four years' 
course it would probably do so. The Royal Military College moreover cannot hope to 
be so fully equipped for practical work as are the older universities, and it is not cer- 
tain that the Canadian Society of Civil Engineers would be willing to recognize the 
college diploma as of equal value. 



SYLLABUS OF INSTRUCTION. 



ALLOTMENT OF TIME. 



11. Proceeding to consider the syllabus of instruction and the hours allotted to each 
subject, the board remarked that the time given to mathematics throughout the course 
was by itself practically as great as the time allotted to all the military subjects put 
together. Surveying and civil engineering together get about the same amount of 
attention, with the result that little more than a quarter of the whole time available is 
given to purely military subjects. They were assured, however, that the amount of 
mathematics taught was only that necessary to enable Cadets to carry on satisfactorily 
the work of the syllabus in physics, surveying and civil engineering. If this be so, the 
time allotted to mathematics cannot lie reduced without reducing the standard attain- 
e 1 in those subjects. And yet, they feel that it is impossible to maintain that the pre- 
sent totals, of 72 hours devoted to tactics, of 36 hours to military administration, and 
36 hours to military law, and those in the second year only, none being taught in the 
first or third years, can impart a satisfactory knowledge of these important subjects, — 
especially when it is remembered that a graduate's diploma is supposed to guarantee 



6 ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

bis qualification for the command of a regiment or a position on the staff of the 
militia. It will' be observed that this question is closely allied with that of a fov 
years' course of instruction. It is perhaps right to add that the four years' course of 
instruction would, by reducing the number of cadets of each year, operate to allow 
more of that individual instruction which is a valuable feature in the college system. 

SURVEYING. 

12. It appeared to the board that the only method by which it might be feasible 
to allot more time to military subjects would be by treating all branches of surveying 
as a single subject, a reform which appeared to be desirable on other grounds also. 
The Professor of 'Civil' Surveying- pointed out to them, and in this the board con- 
curred, that to treat military topography and reconnaissance (as practised at the 
college) as entirely separate subjects from ' civil ' surveying, tended to over-lapping 
of work and waste of power. Military topography is merely the adaptation of the science 
of surveying to particular conditions. It is a rough and ready method of surveying 
for military purposes. As regards reconnaissance, although a rough survey, or sketch, 
almost invariably accompanies a reconnaissance report, it is merely an adjunct to and 
not an essential part of such report. It may here be noted that ' civil ' surveying is a 
misnomer. The proper name of the science is simply ' surveying ' and it should be 60 
designated. 

13. They, therefore, have no hesitation in recommending' that in future the sub- 
ject of surveying should take the place of the present separate subjects of ; civil ' sur- 
veying, military topography and the sketch portion of the subject of reconnaissance, 
the two latter being treated as sub-divisions of the general subject. This will entail 
a re-arrangement of subjects in the syllabus and a re-allotment of the hours of work, 
with the result, as they hope, of an appreciable increase in the time available for mili- 
tary subjects, without interfering with the study of other subjects, even if it be found 
impossible (which should be the subject of expert examination) to reduce the time 
allotted to mathematics. 

14. However this may be, the board feel bound to admit that, even with a more 
considerable increase of the hours available for military subjects than at present seems 
to them probable under any feasible arrangement, it will be impossible to contend that 
the time available in a three years' course for military subjects is not too short to 
enable the college to fulfil the primary object of its existence, viz., the imparting a 
thorough instruction in the elements of the military profession. 

INCREASE OF INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF. 

15. Short of reversion to a four years' course which for the reasons above given, 
they hesitate to recommend, the only practical alternative appears to the board to be 
an increase in the staff of instructors, which will enable more individual attention to 
be given to student- with correspondingly better progress. 

16. Lieutenant-Colonel Taylor recommends this course upon other grounds also, 
viz.. to meet the demands for military instruction made by the permanent force and 
active militia. The military professors, in addition to their college duties, undertake 
two courses of instruction fi>r militia officers, of three months each, during the year, 
and to these they have recently agreed to add a special preparatory course for the 
British Staff College examination. The work thus dune for the militia is of the 
highest value. 

17. The Commandant believes that he can successfully cope with both classes of 
requin ments by a rearrangement of, and small addition to, his present staff of pro- 
fessors and instructors. Be has at present four military professors arid tw< assistant 
instructors, whose work is concerned partly with civil, partly with military subjects. 

lb proposes to dispense with one military professor, and to ask for four additional 

tructors, whom he could allot to the assistance of the different professors, 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS 7 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a 

both military and civil, according to the requirements of the moment. This will 
apparently involve an extra expenditure of about $3,000 per annum. The board 
recommend this proposal. 

ALLOTMENT OF MARKS. 

18. Lieutenant-colonel Taylor proposed reducing the marks now given for rifle 
practice, and allotting marks to cadet non-commissioned officers for performance of 
their duties. 

The board considered that the Commandant should examine the whole question of 
the present allotment of marks, more especially with reference to the proportions 
allowed for theoretical studies as compared with practical work, and for theoretical 
civil studies as compared with military subjects. They were of the opinion that the 
375 marks each now given for military administration and military law, and 750 
allowed for tactics, were not sufficient to encourage study in those important subjects. 
They agree that too many marks, in proportion, are given to rifle practice, and that 
marks should be given to the cadets selected for non-commissioned officers for the per- 
formance of their duties. 

OUTDOOR TRAINING AND CAMP. 

19. Lieut.-eolonel Taylor stated that this examination into the course of instruc- 
tion, on assuming command at the college, had convinced him that more time ought to 
be devoted to practical out-door training, especially in engineering and surveying. 
With this end in view, he proposed to hold the summer examinations at such a dnte 
as would allow them to be completed by June 15, and he would then take the cadets 
into camp for practical training for one month. This would somewhat curtail the 
usual allowance of holidays, but the change of air would, to a large extent, be the 
equivalent of a vacation, as regards health. The board concur in his proposal. 

PERSONNEL AND INTERIOR ADMINISTRATION. 

20. The Board next inquired into the personnel and internal administration of the 
college. 

CADETS. 

Owing to the selection last June of a number of the cadets of the second (now 
first) class for commissions in the permanent force, the college is not full. It could 
easily accommodate 100 cadets, but only 89 are on the books at p»esent. 

The cadets were inspected on parade in winter uniform. The senior class were 
seen at equitation. All classes were also seen at exercises in the gymnasium and in 
their rooms. Their demeanor, address, and physique appeared to the Board to be 
highly satisfactory. 

The physical records of the third, or junior class, after being three months at the 
college, showed the following averages : — 

Age 171 years. 

Height 5 feet 94, inches. 

Chest, fully expanded 374 inches] „_ . , 

( best, not fully expanded 32* inches} average 35 inches - 

Their health was reported by the medical officer to be very good. 

The Board visited the class rooms during study hours and listened to the instruc- 
tion given. 

They also saw and qu<*tioned cadets representing the several classes. 

They made inquiry from both officers and cadets as to whether any abuses took 
place under the name of 'recruiting.' So far as they could ascertain, from necessarily 



8 ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

limited opportunities for judging, no 'hazing,' 'fagging' or other improper practices 
were being carried on. 

No complaints of a serious nature were made. 

BOOTS. 

22. Some complaint was made as to the price charged to cadets for boots ($6). 
which was thought too high for the quality of the article provided. The Board and 
the Commandant considered that there was some ground for the complaint and the 
latter stated that he was already making inquiry into the matter. 

CLOTHING. 

23. Some of the junior cadets reported that, although their measurements were 
supplied in detail before the examination for entrance in May, yet. on joining the 
ccllege in September, they had to wait from two or three weeks before their uniform 
was ready. 

The Board requested the Commandant to inquire into the matter and report to 
headquarters. 

DISCIPLINE. 

24. The Board inquired into the administration of discipline and award of 
punishment, and found both, as carried out at the college, satisfactory. 

cadets' messing. 

25. The Board found the food supplied to the cadets to be, on the whole, good, 
well served, and sufficient in quantity. Certain suggestions for minor improvements, 
e.g., the daily supply of porridge and toast, charges for extras, &c. were referred to 
the Commandant for examination. They are not entirely satisfied that more articles, 
such as jam and toast, might not be included for the price charged for messing. 



26. Bequests were made by the cadets that beer should be allowed at dinner. The 
Commandant stated that he was entirely opposed to the proposal. The Board take 
the same view, and advise that it should not be allowed, unless at the express desire of 
the majority of the parents or guardians. 

» 

WATER SUPPL1 

27. The Board consider the quality of the water supply satisfactory. 

The Commandant informed the Board that, there having recently been two or 
three cases of low fever among members of the staff and their families, he had had the 
water analyzed and the samples had been found satisfactory. 

The quantity of the supply is however reported to be defective outside of the 
inner inclosure. 

cadets' recreation. 

28. The Board found the recreation room accommodation for cadets in the main 
building to be sufficient, but they were impressed with the need for providing better 
means 'for the outdoor recreation and health of the cadets in winter. The L:ytmiasium 
ia made use of to its fullest extent, but it is not by iself sufficient. They recommend 
that a building should !><■ provided which would fulfil the double purpose of a skating 
rink in winter and drill ahed suitable for bud weather at other times. A drill shed 
ii much needed. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a 

WORKSHOP. 

The Board visited the workshop and saw the cadeta at work. 

SUPERIOR STAFF. 

30. The desirability for a rearrangement of the duties of the superior staff, to- 
gether with the commandant's proposal for the reduction of one professor and the 
addition of four assistant instructors have been already considered. (See paragraph 17.) 

Lieutenant-colonel Taylor represented strongly the necessity for the appointment 
of a quartt-rmaster for the college. The duties of quartermaster are at present allotted 
to the adjutant, who has not the time to attend to them properly without neglecting 
his duties as adjutant; consequently they suffer. For example, there is no record of 
the equipment and material belonging to the college, and thus no adequate protection 
against loss. The commandant urged the importance of his being supplied at once 
with a proper equipment ledger, which the quartermaster would keep. 

He proposed, for the appointment of quartermaster, Mr. Hennessy, the present 
superintending clerk, who was well fitted for the post. He should be replaced in the 
office by a junior clerk. 

The board recommend the appointment of a quartermaster, and believe that the 
additional care and attention which such an officer would give to the equipment and 
material in charge of the college would considerably offset the extra cost involved. 

SUBORDINATE STAFF. 

31. As regar.is the subordinate staff, the only alteration asked for by the Com- 
mandant was that two buglers should be supplied. It was incongruous that in a mili- 
tary institution such as the college, parades and duties should be summoned by ring- 
ing a bell. If he could be allowed the services of two buglers he could dispense with 
one of the three soldier orderlies at present provided. He would use the buglers for 
fatigue work when they were not on duty, and he had ample work for an extra man 
in caring for the grounds within the inner enclosure alone. 

The board are not aware how far it may be practicable to provide the buglers or 
employ them for fatigue work in the manner suggested, but they generally support the 
proposal of the Commandant. The buglers should be quartered with the riding estab- 
lishment. (See paragraph 46.) 

PENSIONS. 

32. The attention of the board was drawn to the fact that although many of the 
stoff, both superior and subordinate, have served for long periods at the college, yet it 
it doubtful whether they are by law entitled to pension. It is hardly necessary to 
point out how essential it is to the efficiency of such a staff that good and faithful 
service shall be rewarded by a pension as men get past their work. They recommend 
for the consideration of the Honourable the Minister that all military members of the 
staff should be borne upon the list of the permanent staff of the militia, and, if admis- 
sible under the Civil Service Act, that the civilian members should, for purposes of 
pension, be considered as members of the outside service. 

MILITIA RANK. 

33. In this connection it may be remarked that in the board's opinion it is highly 
desirable that the commandant of the Royal Military College and other officers of the 
British regular army serving at the college, should be granted militia commission-, in 
order to remove any possible doubt as to their right to exercise command over any 
portion of the militia. The subordinate military staff should belong to the militia. 



10 ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

PAY. 

34. The board was requested by the commandant to represent to the Honourable 
tbe Minister his views upon the pay of the civil professors and instructors, as well as 
of the military professors and himself. 

As regards the civil professors, the uniform rate is $2,500, except for the French 
and English professors, which is only $1,200 per annum. Instructors start at $1,000, 
rising to $1,500. The commandant recommends that the civil professors should ge 
the equivalent of light and quarters, which are now allowed to the military professors. 
Compared with the rates now paid by our leading universities, it will be seen hov 
much lower is the remuneration at the Royal Military College, although its yearly 
term of instruction is much longer. The rate of salary paid to the professors of 
French and English is altogether inadequate for the stamp of man required. 

With regard to the military staff it is sufficient to mention that the rates of pay 
art« the same as those fixed 30 years ago, within which time the pay of the militia of 
Canada, including the permanent force, has been raised all round, while the Royal 
Military College is the only institution which has not benefited by this recognition of 
the increased cost of living in the country. It is becoming increasingly difficult to 
get the right stamp of men as military professors or instructors for the remuneration 
offered. 



COLLEGE GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

GROUNDS. 

35. The board are of the opinion that in order to maintain the credit of the college 
in the eyes of the public, the proper care of the grounds should receive serious con- 
sideration. Inter alia the commandant laid before them proposals for the improve- 
ment of the shore to the east of the college, along Navy bay. Much of the work pro- 
posed appeared to be necessary on other grounds than those of appearance. Part of it 
must be carried out for the purpose of protecting the water supply pipe. The present 
boat houses are falling down, and it is now necessary to keep some of the boats out in 
the open through the winter rather than in the boat houses in their present condition. 
The board concurred in the commandant's proposals generally and recommend that 
they be carried out as soon as practicable. In this connection see also paragraph 31. 

RIFLE RAN<;E. 

36. The rifle range was reported satisfactory and safe. 

BUILDINGS. 

37. The board inspected the whole of the main buildings and found them generally 
in good condition. 

DORMITORY. 

38. The dormitory building was in good order and in a satisfactory stat. of 
sanitation, but the overlaying of the present floors by new hardwood floors, already in 
progress, should be completed. 

MATH BUILDING. 

39. The main building was oti the whole in good order. The board inspected the 
meesman's quarters and the kitchen, and found both well looked after and in good 



REPORT OF TEE BOARD OF VISITORS 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a 

order, but they consider that better accommodation for the messman's stores of food 
is desirable in the interests of health. 

GREASE TRAP. 

40. Their attention was drawn to the present arrangements for intercepting the 
grease from the mess scullery and preventing it from getting into the drains. Thei 
intercepting tank is placed near the kitchen door, and complaint is made that it gives 
off an offensive odour. The board consider it advisable for sanitary reasons that some 
other interceptor should be fitted, outside the building if possible, but in any case 
away from the kitchen door. 

LIGHTING. 

41. The Commandant reported that he had under his consideration the question 
of lighting, with a view to better lighting for the class rooms without increasing the 
expense, beyond a small initial expenditure for installation. The board agree that an 
improvement in the lighting of the class rooms is desirable. 

HOSPITAL. 

The board found the hospital in a very satisfactory condition. There were no 
cases in hospital and the general health of the cadets was reported by the medical 
officer as being good. He had not recently had any serious case. 

GYMNASIUM. 

43. The gymnesium was visited. The building and equipment are thoroughly up 
to date and satisfactory, with the exception that the accommodation for shower bath 
and lavatories has been left unfinished for some unexplained reason. These should 
now be completed. The basement, they understand, was intended for a swimming bath 
for use in winter, and for a shooting gallery and bowling alley. The board consider 
the establishment of a swimming bath as originally contemplated in the basement to 
be desirable, but not of as urgent necessity as some other requirement?. 

GUN-SHED. 

44. The board examined the gun-shed and armament provided for artillery drill. 
There could be no question that the armament supplied at present is neither complete 
nor up to date. They consider the course of instruction in such a rapidly developing 
subject as artillery should not cover too wide a field, but should embrace a thorough 
knowledge of one or two typical natures of guns, which guns should be provided com 
pletely equipped in every respect. 

CIVIL SUBORDINATES QUARTERS. 

45. The board inspected the civil subordinate*' quarter.* on Cataraqui Bay. They 
understand that these quarters have been frequently condemned as unfit for habita- 
tion, and they have no hesitation in concurring in this view. They understand that 
plans for new buildings to replace these have been prepared and are under considera- 
tion. If not finally decided upon, they would suggest that buildings in the nature of 
' flats ' would be economical to construct and maintain, and would be suitable for the 
purpose. The college establishment already includes 13 or more civilian employees 
who ought to be lodged within the grounds. The board recommend, that to meet re- 
quirements at least 16 quarters should be provided. At the present moment 2 married 
non-commissioned officers reside in town at a distance of quite twenty-five minutes' 
walk from their duty, and in addition 2 married non-commissioned officers and 3 civi- 
lian servants for whom quarters are not available, also reside outside the college and 



12 



ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

are paid lodging allowance. These should be quartered within the grounds. As the 
cadets' washing is done by the families of the civilian employees, it would be very 
advantageous to include a good washhouse among the new buildings. 

STABLES. 

46. The board inspected the new stables destined to accommodate the horses pro- 
vided for riding instruction. While the stables are nearly ready for occupation, no 
steps have yet been taken to provide quarters for the detachment in charge. It is 
hardly necessary to point out that the men who take care of the horses must be quar- 
tered near the stables. The necessary buildings, including a cookhouse and other 
accessories should be taken in hand at once. Connected with this question is that of 
the completion of the main drain from the stables to the Cataraqui river, into which 
the drainage from the new civil subordinates' quarters and other buildings should 
eventually be conducted. At present the drains for the new stables, though con- 
structed under the building itself, have not been completed outside. Until this drain- 
age system is completed and the men's quarters built, the stables cannot be used. The 
present water supply is reported to be defective in amount both here and elsewhere 
outside the inner enclosure. 

FIRE PROTECTION. 

47. The board requested the Commandant to sound ' fire alarm ' with a view to 
testing the fire protection arrangements of the college. With the exception that the 
wooden cover above the trap over the main valve, used for disconnecting the main for 
fire ■ purposes from the college supply, was frozen to the ground, and required some 
few minutes to get free, the arrangements worked well, the cadets and college staff 
were acquainted with their fire duties, and the pressure of water was sufficient. The 
difficulty due to freezing of the cover referred to can easily be remedied, and the Com- 
mandant undertook to make one which would not be liable to this difficulty, in his 
own workshop. 

48. The board desire to call attention to the fact that no arrangement has been 
made to provide hydrants, or other fire appliances, for the protection of the buildings 
outside the inner enclosure, viz., the commandant's house, married officers' quarters, 
civil subordinates' quarters, the new stables, and two non-commissioned officers' houses 
near the entrance gate to the grounds. In the event of fire at any of these places, the 
only means of combatting it would be the use of water buckets until the city fire bri- 
gade could arrive. The board consider that the expenditure necessary for providing 
fire hydrants within easy reach of these buildings would be amply repaid by the protec- 
tion afforded. This work might be carried out at the same time as the provision of a 
suitable water supply for the new stables. 



GENERAL. 



\I-IT> TO OTTAWA, ETC. 

4i>. The Commandant brought to the notice of the board the advisability of the 
cadets making an official visit to Ottawa, with a view to bringing the college and its. 
course of instruction to the notice of members of parliament and other officials, during 
the session. He thought that ministers and members of parliament should be invited 
to visit the college and be shown over it during term time. He also suggested that an 
occasional visit by the cadets to some of the larger cities would operate to spread more 
widely the reputation of the college. The board concur. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 35a 

COST OF THE COLLEGE. 

50. Lieut.-Colonel Taylor further submitted, that, in annual militia estimates so 
far as they related to the Royal Military College, and in all statements concerning its 
cost to the country, full credit should, in justice to the college, be given for the 
revenue received by it on account of repayments made by cadets and their friends. 
This would largely reduce its apparent cost. 

51. The country appears to the board to possess in the Royal Military College an 
institution of singular value for the training of youths, whether intended for military 
or civil life. While the college does not profess to offer to students the wide choice 
of subjects of education which an university affords, still, by teaching English, French, 
mathematics, surveying, physics, chemistry, and engineering, as well as military sub- 
jects, it embraces many of the most useful. The physical portion of the training, in- 
cluding the systematic and skilled instruction in gymnastics is unique, and the habits 
of discipline, punctuality and obedience, which are here learned, cannot fail to prove 
of great advantage to the graduates in after life. 



CONCLUSION. 

52. In conclusion the board desire to report that on the whole they found the 
college in a satisfactory state and one reflecting credit upon the Commandant and 
staff. While they have made recommendations on many points, which in their judg- 
ment might be improved, yet they are favourably impressed by the bearing, appearance 
and health of the cadets, the nature of the instruction given, the food and other sup- 
plies, the good condition of the more important buildings, and, lastly, by the keen 
interest displayed by the entire staff. 

PERCY LAKE, Major-General, 

Chief of the General Staff. 

W. P. R. STREET. W. D. OTTER, Brigadier-General, 

O. E. MATHIEU, Ptre. Commanding Western Ontario. 

HENRY A. PANET, Major, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. 
CHARLES F. WINTER. Major, 

Acting Secretary. 

Ottawa. February 21, 1906. 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 A. 1908 



REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDED JUNE 30 



19 05 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT 




OTTAWA 

PRINTED BY S. E. DAWSON, PRINTER. TO^THE KING'S MOST 

EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1906 
[No. 36—1906.] 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 A. 1906 



To His Excellency the Eight Honourable Sir Albert Henry George, Earl Grey, Viscount 
Hoicick. Baron Grey of Howick, in the County of Northumberland, in the Peerage 
of the United Kingdom, and a Baronet; Knight Grand Cross of the Most Dis- 
tinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, &c, &c, Governor General 
of Canada. 

My Lord : 

I have the honour to forward to Your Excellency the accompanying Report of the 
Department of Labour of the Dominion of Canada, for the year ending June 30. 1905, 
which is respectfnlly submitted. 

I have the honour to be. 

My Lord, 
Your Excellency's most obedient servant. 
A. B. AYLESWORTH, 

Minister of Labour. 

Department of Labour, 

Ottawa. December 30, 1905. 



:i6— U 



5-6 EDWARD VM. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 A. 1906 



CONTENTS. 

Page. 

Introductory 7 

I. The Labour Gazette 10 

II. Conciliation and Arbitration 32 

III. The carrying out of the Fair Wages Resolution of the House of Commons 

of March, 1900 38 

IV. The Railway Labour Disputes Act 63 

V. The Royal Commission to investigate the alleged employment of aliens by 

the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company 81 

VI. The Royal Commission appointed to inquire into the alleged employment 

of aliens by the Pere Marquette Railway Company 84 

VII. The Royal Commission appointed to inquire into the influx of Italian 
labourers to the city of Montreal, and alleged fraudulent practices of 

employment agencies 88 

VLLL Strikes and Lockouts in Canada during the fiscal year 1904-05 91 

IX. Industrial accidents in Canada during during fiscal year 1904-05 101 

X. The Library of the Department Ill 

XL The Circulation of the Labour Gazette 127 

XII. The Distribution of the Labour Gazette and other publications of the 

Department 129 

XILL Inquiries, correspondence, and other work of Department 131 

XIV. Revenue and Expenditure 136 



5-6 EDWARD VII. SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 A. 1906 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



YEAR ENDED JUNE 30 
19 5 



Department of Labour, Canada, 

Ottawa, September 1, 1905. 

To the Honourable Sir William Mulock, K.C.M.G., M.P., 
Minister of Labour. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit a report on the work of the Department of 
Labour for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. 

During the past year the work of the department has greatly exceeded that of pre- 
vious years. In fact it has been found impossible, with the present staff, to discharge 
with the efficiency which the work merits, the many duties which have come to be part 
of the recognized work of the department. The need of additional clerical assistance 
is imperative. Not only has the work of previous years been continued on a more thor- 
ough and extensive scale, but entirely new duties have been added. The administra- 
tion of the Railway Labour Disputes Act. the work in connection with the Royal Com- 
missions appointed to inquire into the employment of aliens by the Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railway Company, and by the Pere Marquette Railway Company, and the Com- 
mission to inquire into the influx of Italians, the extended nature of the work under- 
taken by the department in the recording and classifying of strikes and lockouts, and 
industrial accidents occurring within the Dominion, the increased number of requests 
for information and inquiries on matters affecting industry and labour, the prepara- 
tion of reference catalogues of labour legislation, labour publications, labour unions 
and employers' associations, all of which are referred to, in detail, in this report, will 
be sufficient evidence of the extended scope of the department's work. 



8 DEPART1IEXT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
The completed volume of the Labour Gazette shows an addition of 125 pages com- 
pared with the volume of the year preceding, 402 pages as compared with the volume 
of 1902-03, 624 as compared with 1901-02, and 804 as compared with 1900-01. This in- 
crease in the size of the Gazette, which has been occasioned by the additional informa- 
tion of a statistical and descriptive character published therein, indicates the increased 
amount of work required in the preparation of material for publication, as well as of 
additional work of a more or less mechanical kind, such as proof-reading, mailing, &c, 
which has been occasioned thereby. 

The number of fair-wages schedules prepared by fair-wages officers of the depart- 
ment, ha", been larger than the number prepared in any previous year, and this, in 
turn, has necessitated a more frequent absence of these officers from the department 
than in previous years, and a larger amount of correspondence in connection with their 
work. In the matter alone of references of disputes under the Conciliation Act of 
1900, has there been any diminution in the work of any branch of the department. 
This is to be accounted for by the fact that the industrial disputes were fewer in num- 
ber and in importance during the fiscal year 1904-05 than in former years of the de- 
partment's existence, a fact, no doubt, due in part, to the prosperity of the times, but 
also, in some measure, to the work of the department itself in supplying information 
of service to employers and employees, of creating a public opinion in the matter of 
trade disputes through the department's records in the Labour Gazette, and to the 
action of parliament in passing the Railway Labour Disputes Act, which has proved 
an effective means of averting strikes or lockouts upon, railways. The work done by 
the Royal Commission appointed, on the recommendation of the Honourable the Minis- 
ter of Labour, during the previous year, to inquire into industrial disputes in British 
Columbia, has also been a factor in preserving industrial peace. Taking the year as a 
whole, it would appear that the general movement of wages has been upward. The de- 
mand for labour has been greater, industry and business more prosperous, the number 
of strikes and lockouts fewer, and labour conditions in general better, during the past 
year, than in any years since the establishment of the department in 1900. 

STAFF OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

No changes were made in the inside staff of the department during the year, with 
the exception of the resignation of one of the third-class clerks, whose position has 
been temporarily filled, pending a permanent appointment. The staff of the correspon- 
dents to the Labour Gazette, which is supplementary to the staff of permanent clerks 
resident at Ottawa, numbered 37 at the end of the year. During the year Mr. Harry 
Peters was appointed correspondent to the Labour Gazette for Berlin, Ont, and dis- 
trict, this locality not having been previously represented on the staff of correspondents 
to the Gazette. 

Changes were also made in the person of correspondents at several points, as fol- 
lows : — 

John Gillespie, correspondent for Calgary and district, during the month of Oc- 
tober, to replace S. D. Milliken, resigned. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY UIXrSTER OF LABOUR 9 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Victor Phaneuf, correspondent for St. Hyacinthe and district, during February, in 
place of N. Samson. 

A. B. Docksteader, correspondent for the Kootenay District, during April, to re- 
place Roland A. Laird, resigned. 

J. A. Killingsworth, correspondent for St. Thomas and district, during May, re- 
placing Albert Eoberts. 

CLASSIFICATION OF THE WORK. 

The work of the department may be classified under the following heads, under 
which, in this report, a review is given in detail : — 

I. The preparation and publication of the Labour Gazette. 

II. The settlement of industrial disputes under the Conciliation Act, 1900. 

III. The carrying out of the Fair Wages resolution of the House of Commons, 
of March, 1900. 

IV. The administration of the Railway Labour Disputes Act. 

V. The appointment, work and results of the Royal Commission to investigate 
the alleged employment of aliens by the Grand Trunk Pacific Rail- 
way Company. 

VI. The appointment, work and results of the Royal Commission appointed to 
inquire into the alleged employment of aliens by the Pere Marquette 
Railway Company. 

VII. The appointment, work and results of the Royal Commission appointed to 
inquire into the influx of Italian labourers to the city of Montreal, and 
the alleged fraudulent practices of employment agencies. 

VIII. Strikes and lockouts in Canada during the fiscal year 1904-05. 

IX. Industrial accidents in Canada during the fiscal year 1901-05. 

X. The library of the Department of Labour. 

XL The circulation of the Labour Gazette. 

XII. The distribution of the Labour Gazette and other publications of the depart- 
ment. 

XIII. Inquiries, correspondence, and other work of the department. 

XIV. Revenue and expenditure of the department. 



10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



I. THE LABOUR GAZETTE. 

The Labour Gazette, the official journal of the department, was published regu- 
larly each month throughout the year, and contained in each issue, as in previous 
years, a general summary of industrial and labour conditions in Canada with detailed 
reports relating to the condition of the labour market, furnished by correspondents of 
the department resident in the several cities of the Dominion. The Gazette also con- 
tained each month descriptive articles and statistical tables on trade disputes, indus- 
trial accidents, immigration and colonization, Canadian trade and revenue, labour 
organization, recent industrial inventions, and fair wages schedules embodied in 
government contracts. Reviews of official reports and government blue books of gen- 
eral interest to labour, published in Canada and other countries, and accounts of recent 
legal decisions in Canadian courts affecting labour, were also included as regular 
monthly features. 

A considerable number of articles embodying the results of special investigations 
conducted by the department, or relating to current happenings of exceptional interest 
from the standpoint of labour, together with a number of special reviews, weTe also 
published from time to time. 

MONTHLY REVIEW OF INDUSTRIAL AND LABOUR CONDITIONS. 

The monthly review of industrial and labour conditions throughout Canada 
related in each case to conditions existing during the preceding month, the informa- 
tion being broadly presented in the form of a general summary, and in detail in 
reports of local correspondents. In the general summary a comprehensive review of 
the general condition and tendency of the labour market in Canada was given, with 
references .to the more important happenings affecting employment and industrial 
activity thoughout the Dominion. In the preparation of the article extensive use 
was made of special as well as the regular reports supplied by local correspondents. 
I Fee was also made of material collected from the daily press of the Dominion 
through the agency of the clipping bureau established in tin- department, and of 
information obtained by the department through correspondence and in other ways. 
The clippings from the press were used in this connection as indicating sources from 
which information might be obtained, and were made the basis of official inquiries, 
through which authoritative information was secured prior to its publication in the 
Gazette. The correspondence conducted by the department was fn this way materi- 
ally increased, a very large number of communications having been sent out for the 
sole purpose of verifying and amplifying information for use in the general num- 
mary article. 

The publication of this information in a concise and systematic form has been 
constantly aimed at. the order in which the different topics were treated being much 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 11 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

the same as in preceding years. The opening paragraph sets forth a brief but com- 
prehensive statement of the main features of the labour market and the most recent 
tendencies in the general demand for labour, and the amount of employment avail- 
able. This is followed by paragraphs in which the more important changes in wages 
and hours reported during the preceding month, and the chief variations in the prices 
of staple commodities affecting cost of living in any section of the Dominion are 
referred to. In a paragraph published under the heading' of ' Interruptions to 
Industry,' reference is briefly made to the condition of the labour market from the 
standpoint of industrial unrest as compared with the preceding month and the cor- 
n. -ponding period of the previous year. Reference is also made under this heading to 
unfavourable weather conditions and important shut-downs, if such had been reported, 
and to industrial establishments destroyed by fire, as reported in the press of the 
Dominion, statements being added where the information is obtainable, of the aggre- 
gate loss caused and the number of workpeople involved. Conditions in the several 
industries and trades are then dealt with in the following order : Agriculture, fishing, 
lumbering, mining, manufacturing, transport, building trades, metal trades, woodwork- 
ing and furnishing trades, printing and allied trades, clothing trades, food and tobacco 
preparation trades, leather trades, miscellaneous trades and unskilled labor. In 
separate paragraphs, following these summaries, references are made to current move- 
ments and events, such as manual training, technical education, municipal ownership, 
meetings of associations, &c. The article concludes with a series of notes relating 
to different subjects which do not lend themselves readily to classification under the 
preceding headings. 

The tabular statement, as first included in the general summary article of the 
December, 1903, Gazette., in which the condition of employment in the several trades 
and industries in the different cities is set forth, was continued during the past year, 
the terms employed indicating the degree to which conditions were favourable or un- 
favourable, as follows: (1) active, busy, very busy: (2) quiet, dull, very dull. 



REPORTS OF LOCAL CORRESPONDENTS. 

Following the plan adopted in .1902, the local correspondents to the Labour Gazette 
were required to send in their monthly reports on official forms supplied by the de- 
'Piartnient), and which contain instructions with regard to the subject matter to be dealt 
with and the arrangement of the material. In this way a more comprehensive cover- 
ing of the field of employment in each locality and a greater uniformity in the method 
of presenting information has been ensured. In the case of particular and exceptional 
happenings, additional and more detailed instructions were forwarded by letter to the 
correspondents individually as the occasion arose. In supplying this and other special 
information required by the department, as well as in the preparation of their monthly 
reports, it is a satisfaction to be able to state that the members of the outside staff of 
the department have, with one or two exception-, shown an appreciable improvement 
in efficiency during the year, and have discharged their important duties in a prompt 
and capable manner. 



12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VIC, A. 1906 
CHANGES IN RATES CF WAGES AND HOURS OF LABOUR. 

The method adopted by the department in 1903 in collecting information relating 
to changes in current rates of wages and hours of labour, and of presenting this infor- 
mation in the Labour Gazette, was continued during the past year.* Mention was 
made in brief form in the general summary article of the more important changes of 
the month immediately preceding. The detailed and revised statements of the depart- 
ment were presented in the form of quarterly articles appearing in the July, 1904, Oc- 
tober, 1904, January, 1905, and May, 1905, issues of the Gazette. The division of the 
year into quarters for the purposes of these tabies was made at first to correspond with 
the seasons, so as to indicate the changes occurring during the winter, spring, summer 
or autumn months; later, however, the division was made to coincide with the quar- 
ters of the calendar year. In these articles statistical tables were published, setting forth 
full details with regard to each change, as to the class of workpeople and number 
affected, the locality in which the change took place, the manner in which it was 
brought about, whether voluntarily by the employer or on demand of the workmen, and 
particulars as to the precise nature of the change and its effect upon total weekly earn- 
ings, or total number of hours worked. In the accompanying article a tabular analysis 
by industries and groups of trade, showing the aggregate effect of the changes, was 
presented, with a descriptive statement pointing out the nature of each change and the 
general result of the changes during each of the periods dealt with. 

Some of the results disclosed in the articles published during the year may be 
briefly referred to. During the spring months of 1904, changes reported to the depart- 
ment would indicate that 40 increases in wages and 13 decreases in hours went into 
effect, together with 10 increases in wages in combination with decreases in hours, and 
one increase in hours. The result was an approximate increase of over $3,600 in the 
weekly wages bill, affecting 2,939 workpeople, with an approximate decrease in working 
hours amounting to over 5,500 per week and affecting 1,038 workpeople. During the 
summer months, 25 increases and one decrease in wages were recorded, with 8 in- 
creases in wages in combination with decreases in hours. The readjustment of lumber- 
men's wages in the Ottawa valley during this period caused a heavy decrease in aggre- 
gate wages, owing to the fact that 11,000 men were affected thereby; on the other hand 
farm hands throughout Canada, and unskilled and railway labourers in western Can- 
ada, received higher wages than ever before. The autumn changes included 17 in- 
creases in wages, 2 decreases in hours, 1 increase in hours and 2 increases in wages in 
conjunction with decreases in hours, resulting in an increase in the total rate of re- 
muneration and a decrease in the hours of employment. A large number of employees 
of the Dominion government received higher wages during this period, the total 
amounting to $1,436, whereas the most important change affecting the condition of 
labour adversely took place at Nanaimo, B.C., where 500 miners had their hours in- 
creased, and certain concessions with regard to the supply of household coal withdrawn. 
During the months of December, January, February and March, the changes in wages 



•A full description of this method, with copies of the circular letter and blank forms 
sent out by the department, was given in the annual report of the leparcment for the year 
ended June 30, 1904, at page 15 . 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 13 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

and hours included 23 increases and 1 decrease in the former, and 6 decreases in the 
latter, the final result being of the nature of an increase in earnings and a decrease 
in working hours. The most important change during this period, from the standpoint 
of numbers affected, was the result of the passing of an early closing by-law in the city 
of Montreal by which the weekly hours of retail clerks were decreased by from 30,000 
to 4U.000. In the building trades over 400 men received improved conditions, involv- 
ing an increase in weekly pay of approximately $327, and a decrease in hours of ap- 
proximately 750 per week. Two hundred and sixty-three railway clerks in the em- 
ploy of the Intercolonial Railway also received increases aggregating about $1,200 per 
month. 

STRIKES AND LOOKOUTS. 

A statistical table and article on strikes and lockouts was continued in each issue 
of the Labour Gazette, the general form and scope of the article being much the same 
as in previous years. A change considerably facilitating reference to the tables for de- 
tails concerning any particular strike, was effected by introducing a classification of 
trade disputes in accordance with the trades and industries affected. In the descrip- 
tive article an account was given of the several disputes set forth in the table, also an 
analysis presenting aggregate statistics as to the number and magnitude of the dis- 
putes, the total loss of time in working days involved, and particulars as to the groups 
of trades affected by disputes, the causes, methods of settlement employed, the results 
of disputes, whether in favour of the employers or the employees, or in the nature of a 
compromise. The record for the month, from the standpoint of the number and mag- 
nitude of the disputes and the loss of time in working days involved, was compared in 
each case with that of the preceding month and the corresponding period of the pre- 
vious year. In collecting and presenting the information embodied in this ftatement 
the utmost care was exercised by the department to ensure the returns being accurate 
and inclusive of all disputes involving over five employees occurring throughout the 
Dominion. 

A comparison of labour disputes in Canada during 1904 and previous years was 
made in a special review published in the January, 1905, issue of the Labour Gazette, 
the method followed in presenting the information being the same as that adopted in 
previous articles of a similar kind published by the department. The year 1904 was 
shown to have been comparatively free from serious industrial disturbances, being 
marked by a large decrease in the number and magnitude of disputes as compared 
with the three preceding years. In 1903 and 1902 the total number of disputes reported 
has been respectively 160 and 123; in 1904, however, the total fell to 103, or one less 
than the number reported in 1901. By trades the record of the four years is set forth 
as follows : — 



14 



DEPARTMEXT OF LABOUR 



5-6 EDWARD VII.. A. 1906 

* 

TABLE SHOWING INDl ATRIAL DISPUTES BY TRADES IN CANADA IN 1901. 1902, 1903 and 1901. 



Trades. 



Building 

Metal 

Woodworking 

Textile 

Clothing 

Food and tobacco Preparation . 

Leather 

Printing and book-binding .... 

Transport 

Longeshoremen 

Mining 

Fishing 

Unskilled 

Miscellaneous 



Total. 



1901 



1* 
23 
4 
6 
10 
9 
1 
2 
1 



2 
11 
8 



104 



Number of Disputes. 



1902 



31 
10 

9 
10 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 
1 
6 
10 



123 



11 
6 
1 

3 

18 
4 

9 
1 
9 

20 



1H0 



29 

IB 

3 

3 

12 

11 

1 

5 



3 

10 



103 



The comparative magnitude of the different strikes in the four years, from the 
standpoint of numbers involved, is shown in the following table : — 

TABLE SHOWING MAGNITUDE OF TRADE DISPUTES ACCORDING TO NUMBERS OF WOR* 
PEOPLE INVOLVED IN 1901. 1902. 1903 and 1994. 







Year. 






1901 


1902 


1903 


1901 




3 
3 
5 
5 

4 
4 
14 
24 
31 
11 


2 

1 
8 

15 
21 
28 

;i7 

4 


5 

5 
10 

9 
18 
23 
19 
34 
36 

1 


2 


1 000 to 2,000 


3 


10 


2 


300 to 500 


9 


3 « i t o 300. 


2 


11 HI in 2' Kl 


10 


.VI t<> UMI. 


15 


25 to 50 


23 




35 




2 








101 


123 


160 


103 







The strikes occurring in the four years, analyzed by mouths, causes, methods of 
settlement and results, is as follows: — 
TABLE SHOWING TRADE DISPUTES IN CANADA BY MONTHS DURING 1901, 1902, 1903 and 1904. 



Months. 




Number of Disputes. 






19H1 


1902 


1903 


1904 


Total. 




7 
3 
13 

n 

7 
SB 

II 
:. 
5 
5 
7 
3 


s 

5 

12 

211 

27 

18 

7 



9 

4 

7 


6 
12 

■> » 

23 
29 

29 

l.i 
11 

i; 

3 

:i 


9 
5 
9 
20 
23 
9 


6 
3 
8 
•t 

3 


30 




2S 




56 




75 




86 




73 


.luh 


12 




28 




21 




23 




19 

9 






'I..> ,1 


104 


123 


llio 


103 


491 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 



15 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 
TABLE SHOWING CAUSES OF TRADE DISPUTES IN CANADA DURING 1901. Ib02. 1903 and 1904. 



Causes. 



For increase, in wages 

Against reduction in wages 

For decrease in hours 

For increase in wages & decrease in hours. 
Against employment of particular person: 

Against conditions of employment 

For recognition of unions 

Sympathetic 

I nclassitied 



Number of Disputes. 



» 



1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


Total- 


48 


54 


6' 


36 


19S 


In 


7 


7 




31 


l 




8 


3 


12 





11 


18 


8 


15 


13 


8 


13 


16 


50 




5 


5 


4 


14 




5 


5 


4 


14 




9 


10 


3 


22 


16 


12 


29 


21 


78 



TABLE SHOWING METHODS OK SETTLEMENT OF TRADE DISPUTES IN CANADA DURING 

1901. 1902. 1903 and 1904. 



Method. 



Number of Disputes. 



1901 



1902 



1903 



1901 



Total. 



Arbitration 

I 'onciliation. 

Negotiations between parties concerned 

Replacement of men 

Return to work on employers' term 
Demands of strikers granted without 

negotiations 

Indefinite or unsettled 

Not reported 



55 
13 
13 


7-1 

12 
20 


12 


5 



15 
26 

19 
12 

1 



37 

10 



21 

30 

212 

50 

84 

2H 
42 
3 



TABLE SHOWING RESULTS OF TRADE DISPUTES IN CANADA DURING 1901. 1902. 1903 and 1904. 



Results. 




Number of Disputes. 








1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


Total. 




1" 
39 
22 


35 
40 
33 

1 


46 
45 
46 
10 


34 

24 

28 

9 

6 


155 




154 




129 




23 




6 











Special articles dealing with the strike of iron and steel workers at Sydney, X.S.. 
which directly affected about 1,500 employees, and was settled by the intervention of 
the Department of Labour under the Conciliation Act. I'.mhi, were published in the July 
and August issues of the Labour Gazette. A full statement of the cause and progress 
of the dispute was given, with copies of the correspondence conducted between thi 
Sydney Board of Trade, the Dominion Iron and Steel Company, the Grand Secretary 
of the Provincial Workmen's Association and the department. The good offices of the 
department were accepted on July IT. and the strike was officially declared at an end 
on the 22nd, after having been in existence for over seven weeks. The articles con- 
tained also a full statement in regard to the terms of settlement, and the negotiations 
with the government arising out of the calling out of the militia in July. 



16 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
A special review of the report of the Labour Department of the British Board of 
Trade on strikes and lock-outs occurring in the United Kingdom in 1903 was published 
in the August, 1904, Gazette. 

INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS. 

Publication was begun in the November, 1903, issue of the Labour Gazette of a 
monthly statistical table and article relating to industrial accidents^ in which account 
was taken of accidents sustained by workmen in the course of their employment result- 
ing in the loss of life or limb, or other serious impairment of industrial efficiency.* 
The publication of these statistics was continued, the tables setting forth a record of the 
locality, date and nature of each accident, whether fatal or otherwise, classified accord- 
ing to trades and industries, and with a separate column for remarks describing the 
circumstances attending the accident. In the descriptive article the record of the 
month was set forth by trades and industries, and mention made under a separate head- 
ing of any serious disasters involving a large loss of life. A statement was also 
included in which the number of fatal and other accidents occurring each month was 
compared with the record for the previous month and the corresponding month of the 
previous year. In collecting material for this article, the department relied largely on 
the reports supplied by its correspondents situated in the different cities of the 
Dominion, upon official statements furnished by other government departments both of 
the Dominion and of the provinces, and on information collected by the clipping 
bureau from the press of the Dominion, the last being employed largely as a basis for 
securing detailed information by correspondence with individuals or companies con- 
cerned. 

A special review of the industrial accidents occurring in Canada throughout the 
calendar year of 1904 was published in the January, 1905, issue of the Labour Gazette, 
and contained much interesting and valuable material illustrative of the danger in- 
volved in the several employments. It was shown that the number of workmen killed 
outright by accidents during 1904, while engaged in their regular employments, num- 
bered 894. An analysis of the returns according to trades showed that the railway ser- 
vice was by far the most dangerous employment, no less than 273 workpeople having 
lost their lives in the operation of Canadian railways during the year. Xext to the 
railway service, the agricultural industry, in which 110 were killed, and the mining 
industry, in which 106 were killed, were reported as having the largest number of 
fatalities. In the trades grouped under the heading of general transport 104 deaths 
occurred, in the metal trades 73 deaths, and in the lumbering and sawmilling industry 
69 deaths. In the other industries comparatively few fatalities were reported. 

The non-fatal accidents of the year totalled 2,095, of which the greatest number 
took place among workmen engaged in the metal trades, of whom 492 were injured; 
in tin railway service there were 360, and in the general transport branches 169 men 



* An explanation of the manner in which this matter was collected and presented by the 
department was given In the annual report for the year ended June 30, 1904. at page 11. a 
copy of the blank form used by the department In obtaining returns being printed on page 
14. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTT 1IISISTER OF LABOUR 



17 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

injured. The other groups of trades ranked in the following order as regards the num- 
ber of serious accidents: Woodworking, 154; building, 139; unskilled labour. 121; 
lumbering and sawmilling, 119 ; agriculture, IIS. 

The balance of the review was devoted to an exhaustive analysis by trades and in- 
dustries of the causes of the fatal and non-fatal accidents reported throughout the 
year. By way of illustrating the manner in which these statistics were ,presentt 
following tables relating to the railway service and the building trades are given: — 



RAILWAY SERVICE. 


BUILDING TRADES. 


Causes of Accidents. 


Killed. Injured. 


Causes of Accidents. 


Killed. 


Injured. ' 




53 35 

33. :; 

18 21 
12 24 




13 23 






5 




•» 






Falling' from trains and cars 

Fallling from trains and run oyer. 
Foot catching in frogs, etc.. and 

Kim over by brail in other 


22 
26 

5 

47 
3 
2 i 

a 


19 
3 

5 

23 
5 
12 

1 
16 



2 

8 
5 
2 

13 
2 
1 
1 
1 

29 


Collapse of buildings and walls. 


2 

1 

4 

3 

1 

■> 


14 




1 
< 

2 
5 


Injured by boiler explosions 

Injured by blasting, dynamite, etc. 




■i 


Struck by falli - and 


6 


Crushed between cars, engine-' 




13 




1 


Striking objects when on moving 


"i 

2 

1 

4 
1 


Struck by falling metal 

Struck by falling window sash... . 


* 


Striking objects when i 

Injured by falling snow or rock — 
Injured by electric shock 

Struck by falling freight 


2 
3 


2 


Injured by elevators and hoists.. 
Injured by electric -■hock.. 

Drowned. 


- 
1 

7 


Falling from ladders,. 

P'alling in other ways 


Unclassified.. 1 1 






Injured by machinery, belting, etc. 




Unclassified ..... 









It will be seen from the above how valuable a series of statistical returns of 
nature must prove when extended over a period of time sufficient to permit of practi- 
cal deductions being made. The element of personal danger involved in any employ- 
ment is one of importance both to the employer and the employee. The efficacy of pro- 
tective legislation can be accurately tested and the need of additional legislation indi- 
cated only by means of statistical data. The department has had many proofs 
widespread interest of these statistics. Insurance companies, and particularly accident 
insurance companies, have signified that they have found the material very valuable, 
and in other connections the information has been of great practical utility. 



IMMIGRATION AND COLONIZATl 

Publication was continued of special articles dealing with immigratioi. 
Dominion and with colonization operations carried on in western Canada an. 
unsettled portions of Quebec. Ontario and British Columbia. Returns for the t- 
year ended June 30, 1905, showed that the number of immigrants entered at Can.T ; 
ports was largely in excess of the previou , which in turn bad 

36—2 



18 DEPARlilEXT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
vious years by a large margin. Particularly heavy were the arrivals during the winter 
and spring months of 1905, the movement from Europe having been fully two weeks 
earlier than in any previous year. The influx of settlers from the western States of 
aerican Union into Canada, which had fallen off somewhat during the autumn 
months, also recommenced on a heavy scale, the general quality of the immigrants, 
both from Great Britain and the United States, comparing very favourably with former 
years. The effect upon conditions in the labour market, especially among agriculturists 
and ihe unskilled classes, was far-reaching. The monthly articles in which the promi- 
nent features of the movement were dealt with were presented according to the same 
general plan as previously adopted, being composed largely of statistical tables, accom- 
-panied by analyses and comments relating to the more salient developments of the 
preceding month. A considerable improvement, however, was made in the manner of 
presenting statistical data relating to immigrant arrivals, which were previously classi- 
fied in totals according as reported from Great Britain, the continent of Europe and 
the United States. By special arrangement with the Immigration Branch of the De- 
partment of the Interior, a more detailed classification of arrivals was presented, the 
tables showing the extent of immigration by the several ocean ports, both for the month 
and for the fiscal year to date, in the ease of arrivals from Europe, and by the ports of 
Montreal and Winnipeg in the case of arrivals from the United States. A table relat- 
ing to British emigration returns was also included, based on information received 
monthly from the British Board of Trade. Tables relating to homestead entries, the 
nationality of homesteaders and of Dominion lands patented were published each month 
as in previous years. The department also secured the co-operation of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, the Canada North-west Land Company, Limited, the 
Canada Land Company, the York Farmers' Colonization Company, and other land and 
colonization companies, in the furnishing of periodical returns with regard to land 
sales for publication in the Labour Gazette. In the articles accompanying and analys- 
ing the above returns, reference was made from month to month to developments of 
current interest, the following, among several other subjects, having been briefly dealt 
with : The operations of different immigration aid societies, the immigration employ-, 
nient bureau established by the Ontario government at Toronto, child immigration, 
immigration enterprises conducted by the Salvation Army, operations of the Montreal. 
Lake St. John and other colonization societies and the Western Immigration Associa- 
tion. 

Two special articles dealing with the subject of imxnigration were published in the 
Labour Gazette in connection with certain fraudulent representations made in Great 
Britain to mechanics and other skilled workmen with a view of inducing emigration 
to Canada. The matter was discussed in the House of Commons in the month of June, 
1904, and in Marcb, 1905. The action taken by the Dominion government in this con- 
nection, as explained in the House of Commons, was described in these articles, and a 
brief report given of the proceedings taken to prevent a recurrence of the evil.* 



reference will be found elsewhere In the present report to the proceedings of the 
special commissioner appointed on June 20 to enquire Into the circumstances attending the 
y immigration of Italians into Montreal during 1904. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 19 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

CANADIAN TRADE AND REVENUE. 

The method adopted in 1904, of reporting briefly, in a separate article, current 
statistics relating to Canadian trade and revenue, as a supplementary index to the 
general condition of labour and industry, was continued, the statistical tables included 
in the article being published by courtesy of the Departments of Customs, Finance, 
and Trade and Commerce. Official returns relating to provincial revenues and ex- 
penditure were also obtained. The material of the articles was classified as in previous 
years according as it referred to foreign trade, Imperial trade, domestic trade, and 
Canadian revenue and expenditure. An analysis of conditions existing in the preced- 
ing month >was given under each of these headings in so far as they affected or illus- 
trated current conditions of employment. Under the headings of foreign and Imperial 
trade, for example, the review set forth the record of exports and imports, and the 
demands of the different foreign markets for Canadian produce as based upon periodi- 
cal statements made by Canadian trade agents. In the paragraph dealing with 
domestic trade, in addition to a brief summary of market conditions during the preced- 
ing month, a precis of the annual reports of Canadian chartered banks and financial 
institutions was given, and references included to the current prices of Canadian 
securities, current loans and deposits of banks. In the preparation of this material, 
information supplied by local correspondents to the Labour Gazette, and financial and 
trade journals dealing with Canadian conditions, were extensively employed, verifica- 
tion of statistical and other data being obtained by the department from authoritative 
sources. 

SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT. 

The results of a number of special investigations conducted by the department 
into subjects of interest and importance to labour were published in the Labour 
Gazette during the past year. Among the subjects dealt with in this way were, the 
rates and tendencies of wages and hours of labour in Canada, the investigation into 
which was begun in the previous year ; the housing problem in Canada ; the early clos- 
ing movement during the summer of 1904; co-operative savings and credit societies 
in Canada; and the inspection of industrial establishments. 

RATES AND TENDENCIES OF WAGES AND HOURS OF LABOUR IN CANADA. 

An extensive investigation into the subject of current rates and past tendencies 
of wages and hours of labour in Canada was comenced by the department during the 
month of May, 1904.* Much valuable information was collected, over 1,700 separate 
returns in the nature of forms filled in with statistical information having been 
received in reply to requests for information sent out by the department. Publication 
was begun in the X >vember, 1904, issue of the Labour Gazette of a series of statistical 



•A statement setting forth the method in which the investigation was conducted, with 
copies of the circular communications and blank forms employed in collecting the informa- 
tion, together with a table showing the number of communications sent out by the depart- 
ment and answers received thereto from the several groups of trades, were given In the 
annual report of the department for the year ended June 30, 1904, pages 22 to 27. 

36— 2J 



20 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

tables, based on this material, setting forth in detail the current wages and hours in 
the several groups of trades in a large number of localities, and a record of changes 
for a period of several years. Information collected from other sources was also 
embodied in these tables, such as the rates obtained by the fair wages officers of tjhe 
department, during the past four years, in connection with their duties in supplying 
fair wage schedules for government contracts and changes in wages previously 
recorded in the Gazette. The tables published in Vols. I and II. of the Gazette, in 
which statistics of wages and hours in 1900 and 1901 were given, were also carefully 
compared and any change in rates, as indicated by more recent returns, recorded. 

Care was taken with regard to the form in which the tables were published to 
present the information collected as much in detail and in as simple a manner as 
possible, columns being added to show the exact amount of every increase or decrease 
and its nature. 

The tables published during the year related to the trades included under the 
heading of printing and allied trades, viz., hand and machine compositors, pressmen, 
bookbinders, electrotypers and stereotypers, (published in the November and December 
issues of the Labour Gazette,) and the different trades included under the heading of 
the building trades, viz., bricklayers, masons, carpenters, lathers, plasterers, painters, 
plumbers, stonecutters and builders' labourers (published in the February, March, 
April, May and June •Gazettes). 

In the article accompanying each of these tables an attempt was made, by the use 
of tabular analyses, to indicate their general significance and bearing. In the matter 
of current hours, for example, a tabular statement was prepared for each trade, 
showing the number of returns received by provinces of the ten-hour day, the nine- 
hour day, the eight-hour day, and the shorter working day on Saturdays. In this 
way, though no estimate of the numbers of employees affected by the individual 
returns was made, a fair idea was presented of the comparative extent to which the 
different working days prevailed throughout the several sections of the Dominion. 
With regard to current rates of wages also, certain general tendencies illustrated by 
the tables were pointed out. It was shown, for example, that in all the provinces 
and in every branch of trade wages were higher, other things being equal, in the 
larger centres of industry, instances to the contrary being for the most part limited to 
small villages into which workmen of the more skilled classes have to be brought from 
outside localities when work requiring their services has to be performed. It was 
shown also that as between the several provinces wages were considerably higher west 
of the great lakes, the highest point being reached in British Columbia, though the 
larger Ontario cities and towns situated in close proximity to large American cities 
on the international border reported high rates for several classes. The lowest rates 
of wages and longest working days were found to prevail in the province of Quebec. 

The articles also contained a series of tabular analyses of the changes in wages 
and hours, of which a record was obtained among the several trades. In the case of 
wages the analysis showed in each trade the number of changes recorded by years and 
provinces, so that it of any movement in rates could be ascertained at a glance 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 21 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

from the standpoint both of time and of locality. In the ease of hours the analysis was 
by years and according to the nature of the change, whether from a twelve to a ten- 
hour day, from a ten to a nine-hour day, from a nine to an eight-hour day, or for a 
shorter working day on Saturdays. A separate statement was also given for each trade, 
in which the number of changes in hours were set forth by provinces. In this way <the 
department was enabled to indicate in some detail the main tendencies in the wages 
movement in Canada during the past fifteen years, and to record several changes of 
a much earlier date. The general result shown was that in every branch a very 
marked upward movement in wages had taken place in the period named, especially 
during the past five years and in the year 1903. 

By way of illustrating more fully the extent of the upward tendency in wages dur- 
ing the past fifteen years, the statistical matter contained in the report of the Royal 
Commission on Capital and Labour issued in 1889, which contained several tables re- 
lating to wages and hours in a number of the leading centres of Ontario and the 
eastern provinces, was carefully collated and compared with the most recent returns 
obtained by the department for the same classes and localities. In every class the gen- 
eral result showed a material increase, amounting as a rule to from ten to thirty per 
cent. The returns relating to wages and hours contained in the census for Canada for 
1870-71, 1880-81 and 1890-91 were also analysed, and the average earnings of the dif- 
ferent classes during the three decades shown. On the whole the period between 1870 
and 1880 witnessed, according to the census returns, a general decline in wages ; in the 
succeeding decade, however, wages regained and in many cases largely exceeded their 
former level. 

CO-OPERATIVF. SAVINGS AND CREDIT SOCIETIES OF CANADA. 

In the March, 1905, number of the Gaz&tte the department published the result of 
an investigation into co-operative savings and credit societies in Canada, in which 
details were given as to the number and nature of the work of the existing co-operative 
savings societies in the Dominion. The origin of the societies was outlined, as well 
as their primary functions, method of administration and management, funds and 
resources, and present financial standing. An account was also given of the benefits 
derived by shareholders and the public from these institutions. 

THE HOUSING PROBLEM LN CANADA. 

During the spring and summer season of 1904 a scarcity in the supply of houses 
available for workingmen's families was reported at several points in the Dominion, 
more particularly in the larger centres of population and industry situated in the pro- 
vince of Ontario. In the city of Toronto the house famine was particularly severe, 
and led to active intervention by the Board of Associated Charities and other associa- 
tions. In Manitoba and the Xorthwest Territories also the rapid development of the 
country and heavy influx of new population had occasioned considerable inconvenience 
and enhancement in property valuations and rentals. Owing to the general nature of 
these conditions and the importance of the question, as affecting not only the financial 
condition but the physical comfort and health of large numbers of the working classes, 



22 DEPARTMEXT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

a special investigation was conducted by the department during the month of July, in 
order that comprehensive and reliable information with regard to the matter for the 
whole of Canada might be obtained. 

The investigation was conducted chiefly through the correspondents of the Labour 
Gazette, a special report having been prepared by each with specific information on the 
following points in regard to the cities in which they were resident : — 

1. The supply of houses available for workingmen at the time, relative to the 
demand. 

2. The class of house desired by the workingman and the rental which he found it 
necessary to pay for such a house. 

3. The extent to which families had been obliged to live in boarding-houses, be- 
cause of inability to secure individual houses. 

4. The tendency of rents during the past few years, and the probable future ten- 
dency. 

5. A general statement as to the cost of building ; whether or not new houses were 
likely to be built in the near future; if not, why additional building will not take 
place. 

t 
From information received in reply to these communications, a tabular statement 
was prepared setting forth the more salient features of the situation in each city in 
brief and accessible form. Information of a particular or local character which did 
not lend itself to tabulation was added in an article accompanying this statement. A 
general analysis of the material collected was also given as to the supply of work- 
people's dwellings throughout the several cities, the tendency of rentals, the extent to 
which boarding has been resorted to among workpeople, and the more general cruises 
affecting the situation. It was found that a pronounced scarcity in the class of dwell- 
ings suitable for occupation by workpeople existed in 24 out of 30 cities from which 
detailed reports were received, conditions being most unfavourable in the cities in- 
cluded within a radius of 70 or 80 miles of Toronto. Rentals were found to have 
increased by from 15 to 40 per cent during the past five years, Sydney, N.S., being 
the only city from which a decline was reported. The practice of more than one 
family occupying the same house was reported as having considerably increased, and 
the number of workpeople boarding: out was shown to be unusually large, lodging 
houses frequented by unmarried men being particularly crowded. These and 
other features were attributed by most of the correspondents to the general tendency 
on the part of capitalists during the past few years to regard investments in working- 
men's houses with disfavour, as a result of the increased cost of building, both for 
material and for the labour required in construction. Building, it was estimated, had 
increased from 20 to 334 per cent, according to locality. The general prosperity and 
extensive development of industry by increasing the number of workpeople, stimulat- 
ing civic improvements, and thus causing inci was held to have 
affected the situation. As reflecting the general situation loan companies were 
reported to have diminished the percentage of advances on houses under construction, 
a procedure which particularly affected the working classes, who in building their 
homes proceed in a large proportion of cases on the instalment plan. Of the remedies 
proposed, municipal intervention, the extension of - the encourage- 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 23 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

nient of building societies, and the formation of co-operative associations were most 
frequently mentioned. 

In addition to the immediate purpose served by the presentation of this material 
in tabular form, considerable light was thrown incidentally on the standard of living 
and comparative degree of comfort obtainable by the working classes in the several 
cities of the Dominion. 

THE EARLY CLOSING MOVEMENT IX CAN IDA. 

A second special investigation conducted by the department, chielly through the 
correspondents to the Labour Gazette, had to do with the extent to which early closing 
movement arrangements were adopted in the several trades and industries during the 
summer season of 1904. The points on which particular information was requested 
for each city and district were as follows : — 

1. The trades and callings chiefly affected. 

2. The extent to which the movement prevailed as compared with previous years, 
noting in this connection any tendency towards an increase or decrease in the 
practice. 

3. The approximate number of workpeople affected. 

4. Information of a special nature on other points. 

The information received was published in the Labour Gazette for October, 1904, 
in the form of a tabular statemnt under appropriate heads. Retail clerks were found 
to be the class particularly affected by early closing arrangements ; barbers had also 
secured similar arrangements in most of the cities. Among factory employees a large 
number of instances were reported in which early closing arrangements :. Saturdays 
were adopted, with or without longer hours in compensation on the other days of the 
week. The form of arrangement which chielly recommended itself to the working 
people was the Saturday half holiday, where the nature of the employment permitted. 
Retail clerks took Wednesday or Monday afternoons instead of Saturdays. Thirteen 
correspondents reported the movement as increasing in public favour in their respec- 
tive districts. 

INSPECTION OF INDUSTRIAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN CANADA. 

A special article was published in the November, 1904. is- hour 

Gazette, on the inspection of industrial establishments as carried out in the several 
provinces of the Dominion in which factory legislation has been enacted. 

A brief statement was given, by way of introduction, relating to the different Acts 
passed by the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba and Nova Scotia, and the dates 
on which the work of inspection was begun in the first three provinces, no inspector 
having been appointed for the province of Nova Scotia. In Ontario and Quebec, the 
work of inspection has been continuous since the years 1887 and 1888 respectively; in 
Manitoba the first inspector was appointed in 1901. A brief resume was also given of 
the portions of the si vera] Acts relating particularly to the appointment and duties of 



24 DEPAHTMEXT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
inspectors. The main portion of the article consisted of a concise topical review of the 
annual reports of th; inspectors., numbering in all about 100, setting forth the results 
of the! .rations and recommendations, and containing much valuable informa- 

tion as to the general condition of factory employment in the several provinces. In 
preparing this material the different comments of the several inspectors in regard to a 
large number of subjects were carefully collated and the results set forth in separate 
graphs. In this way details as to existing conditions and administration of the 
law during past years with regard to the following matters, were set forth : The guard- 
ing of the personal safety of employees in factories and their protection about machin- 
ery, including a reference to the number of accidents recorded from year to year; 
boiler inspection; the inspection of elevators; the protection of factory employees 
against tire, with much information relating to the most approved forms of fire escapes, 
means of extinguishing fires, &c. ; the improvement of sanitary conditions in factories ; 
the existence of the sweating evil; the employment of female or child labour in Cana- 
hours of labour, and Sunday labour. Certain general features of fac- 
tory life in Canada, such, for example, as the general tendency for conditions of em- 
ployment to be on a better level in the larger establishments situated in important 
centres than in smaller factories in towns and cities, were illustrated. Much light was 
also thrown incidentally on industrial and trade conditions during the several years 
covered by the inspectors' reports and the effect of trade activity on such matters as 
wages, employment of female labour, number of accidents, length of the working day, 
lie. The number of inspectors appointed, the number of establishments visited, and 
the gradual extension in scope of the duties of the inspectors were also set forth. In 
the concluding paragraph of the article a list of the names, addresses and districts of 
the factory inspectors at present holding office in Canada was given. 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS AND AGENCIES IX CANADA. 

A special investigation was conducted by the department, during the summer of 
1904, with regard to employment bureaus in Canada, with a view to ascertaining more 
particularly the number of agencies in existence, the manner in which they are con- 
ducted, and the nature and extent of the business which they cany on. An official 
communication was addressed to all the agencies classed as employment bureaus or 
agencies in the directories of the several cities or municipalities in Canada, with which 
was inclosed a blank form on which it was requested that a return as to the nature 
and extent of the business carried on and other particulars, should be made. The de- 
partment also corresponded with the clerks of the chief municipalities with a view of 
securing additional statistical information. The result of the material thus col 
was set forth in a tabular statement published in the September, 1904, issue of the 
Labour Gazette, in which the various agencies were classified according to locality, and 
information given with regard to such particulars as date of establishment, number of 
applications for work received, number of positions filled, charges made to applicants, 
- of situations obtained, &c. In the accompanying article a reference was made 
to the farm labour employment bureau at Toronto, in charge of the Bureau of Coloni- 
zation under the Department of Crown Lands of Ontario. Similar work carried on by 
vernment of the Northwest Territor Iso described. A statement with 



REPORT OF THE DEPOT! MINISTER OF LABOUR 25 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

regard to the employment bureaus assisted by municipal funds and to employment 
agencies established by trade unions, was included in the article, and a brief outline 
given of the legislation passed in the different provinces and the by-laws of several 
municipalities relating to employment agencies. 

OTHER SPECIAL ARTICLES AND SUBJECTS OF CURRENT INTEREST. 

Among other subjects dealt with in special articles in the Labour Gazette during 
the past year, the following may be mentioned : — 

1. Legislation enacted during the year by the Dominion parliament and by the 
several legislatures affecting industrial and labour conditions. In this connection 
eleven articles in all were published during the year. 

In the August and September, 1904, issues of the Gazette, Dominion legislation 
was briefly reviewed, the chief Acts affecting labour being those relating to the national 
transcontinental railway, the responsibilities of pilots, the prevention of accidents, the 
calling out of the militia, and the various measures granting assistance to different 
industries, enlarging banking facilities. &c. 

The chief Act affecting labour passed by the Ontario legislature during 1904 was 
an important amendment to the Factories Act; other Acts referred to in the review 
were measures encouraging colonization, respecting weather insurance, taxation of 
railways, &c. A detailed review of important amendments to the Quebec Land Ac; 
affecting the status of colonists and the lumber industry, was reviewed in the August 
Gazette. The ordinances passed by the Northwest Territories affecting labour, during 
1904, were reviewed in the November issue, while Manitoba legislation was dealt with 
in March, 1905. The British Columbia legislation of the year included measures aff> 
ing the hours of labour in coal mines, the protection of wages, the regulation of ex- 
plosives, and the licensing of commercial travellers. In New Brunswick a Facto i 
Act was introduced on the recommendation of a special commission; this was reviewed 
in the June, 1905, issue of the Gazette, in which reviews also appear on labour legisla- 
tion passed in Quebec and by the Dominion parliament during a portion of the session 
of 1905. A series of regulations relating to coal mines in the Northwest Territories 
issued by the Department of Indian Affairs, Canada, were also reviewed. 

2. The conventions of labour congresses, and unions, manufacturers' and em- 
ployers' associations, municipal conferences, &c, held during the year. 

I he following were among the more important meetings thus reported : The union 
meeting of the Canadian divisions of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, held at 
Montreal in August; the twentieth annual convention of the Trades and Labour C 
gress of Canada, the second annual convention of the National Trades and Labour 
Congress of Canada, the fourth annual convention of the Union of Canadian Munici- 
palities, the :mnual meeting of the Grand Council of the Provincial Workmens' Asso- 
ciation of Nova Scotia, the thirty-third annual convention of the Manufacturers' As 
sociation, the annual convention of the Ontario Municipal Association, the annual 



26 DEPART1IEXT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

convention of the Canadian Conference of Chanties and Correction, and the annual 
meeting of the Employers' Association of Toronto. 

3. Other current happenings to which special reference was made were as fol- 
lows : An increase by the Ontario government in the staff and jurisdiction of factory 
onspectors, an agreement concluded in June between the Toronto Railway Company 
and its employees, a report of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association on conditions 
of employment in Canada, a proposed pension fund for employees of the Michigan 
Central Railway Company, and the prosecution brought at Toronto against an alleged 
combine in restraint of trade in plumbing supplies. 

SPECIAL REVIEWS. 

A number of publications received at the department during the year were re- 
viewed in special articles in the Gazette as being of particular interest to industry or 
labour. A list of the publications reviewed in this way during the year is as follows : — 

1. — Volume I. of a report issued by a committee appointed by the Secretary of 
State for Home Affairs of Great Britain, to inquire into all amendments and exten- 
sions of the Workmen's Compensation Acts. The report contained an historical review 
of the different Employers' Liability and Workmen's Compensation Acts, passed in 
Great Britain, and set forth in detail a number of proposed amendments, the more im- 
portant of which were referred to in the review published in the Gazette. 

2. — Industrial betterment institutions in New Jersey manufacturing establish- 
ments — a review prepared for the Department of Social Economy of the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition by the Bureau of Statistics of New Jersey in 1904. The report 
contained an account of the institutions existing in seventy-five factories, including 
the Celluloid Company, of Newark, N.J. ; the Sherwin-Williams Company, Newark, 
N.J., and the Weston Electric Instrument Company, Waverly Park, N.J., whose insti- 
tutions were most fully described. 

3. — Volume II. of the Eourth Census of Canada, 1901, containing statistical tabl^ 
relating to the natural industries of the Dominion, arranged under the general heads 
of agriculture, minerals and fisheries. 

4. — The Fourth Annual Report of the Department of Labour, describing the work 
of the department during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

5. — The Report of the Inspector of Insurance and Registrar of Friendly Societies 
of Ontario, giving the transactions of these societies during the year 1903, and refer- 
ring to certain insurance and benevolent features of Ontario labour organizations. 

6. — The report of the Commissioner appointed to inquire into the alleged employ- 
ment of aliens in connection with the Grand Trunk Pacific surveys. 

7. — Report of the Commissioner appointed to inquire into the immigration of 
Italian labourers into Montreal during 1904. The reviews of this and of the preceding 
report were of considerable length and minuteness. 

REVIEW OF BLUE BOOKS AND OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In addition to the above list of publications reviewed under a separate heading in 
the Labour Gazette, a large number of reviews, of important blue books and official 
reports received at the department, containing information in reganl to labour and in- 
dustrial conditions, were given in the Labour Gazette, as in previous years, under the 
heading of ' Reports of Departments and Bureaus.' These publications included 18 
reports issued by the Dominion government, lit reports issued by different provincial 
governments, 18 reports by the Goveri [tain, 2 r« porta issued by the 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 27 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Australian government, 1 report issued by the Government of New Zealand, 30 reports 
issued by United States governments, 4 reports issued by the Belgian and French gov- 
ernments, respectively, and 1 German report. A complete list of these reports, classified 
according to the governments issuing them, is as follows : — ■ 



CANADA. 

1. Eeports of Experimental Farms, Canada, 1903. 

2. Eeport of Superintendent of Forestry for year ended June 30, 1903. 

3. Report of the Commission appointed to investigate the different electro-thermic 
processes for the smelting of iron ores and the making of steel in operation in Europe. 

4. Eeport of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of Canada for the 
year ended December 31, 1903. 

5. Eeport of the Postmaster General for year ended June 30, 1904. 

6. Tables of the trade and navigation of the Dominion of Canada for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1904. 

7. Eeturns and statistics of the Inland Eevenues of the Dominion of Canada for 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

8. Eeport of the Fourth Annual Convention of the Union of Canadian Munici- 
palities held at London, Ont., September 20, 21 and 22, 1904. 

9. Annual report of the Department of the Interior for the year 1903-04. 

10. Report of the Department of Trade and Commerce for the fiscal year ended 
June 30, 1904. 

11. Eeport of the Minister of Justice as to penitentiaries of Canada for the year 
ended June 30, 1904. 

12. Public Accounts of Canada for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

13. Eeport of the Minister of Public Works for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1904. 

14. Thirty-seventh annual report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries, 1904. 

15. Annual report of the Department of Indian Affairs for the year ended June 
30, 1904. 

16. Eeport of the Minister of Agriculture for the Dominion of Canada for the year 
ended October 31, 1904. 

17. Summary by the Geological Survey of Canada of the mineral production of 
Canada for 1904. 

18. Annual report of the Department of Eailways and Canals for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1904. 

Nova Scotia — 

1. Eeport of the Department of Mines, Nova Scotia, for the year ended Septem- 
ber 30, 1904. 

Quebec — 

1. Inspection of industrial establishments and public buildings of the province 
of Quebec — abstracts from the general report of the Minister of Colonization and 
Public Works for 1904. 

Ontario — 

1. Mineral production of Ontario during 1903; bulletin No. 6, Ontario Bureau 
of Mines. 

2. Annual report of the Dairymen's Associations of the province of Ontario, 
1903. 

3. Sixteenth annual report of the Inspectors of Factories for the province of 
Ontario. 

4. Annual report of the Beekeepers' Association of Ontario, 1903. 



28 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

5. Thirty-fifth annual report of the Fruit Growers' Association of Ontario, 
1903. 

6. Official statements made by building societies, loan companies, lending land 
companies and trust companies for the year ended December 31, 1903. 

7. Report of the Bureau of Mines of Ontario, 1904; part I. 

8. Laws affecting children, both from the Dominion and Ontario statutes. 
9. Twenty-second annual report of the Provincial Board of Health of the pro- 
vince of Ontario for the year 1903. 

10. Report of the Farmers' Institutes of the province of Ontario, 1904; Part II. 
— Women's institutes. 

11. Annual reports of the Live Stock associations for the province of Ontario, 
1903. 

12. Annual report of the Bureau of Industries for the province of Ontario, 1903. 

13. Tenth annual report of the Farmers' Institutes, Ontario, for 1904; Part I. — 
Farmers' institutes. 

14. Report of the Commissioner of Crown Lands of the province of Ontario for 
the year 1904. 

15. Nineteenth annual report of the Commissioners for the Queen Victoria 
Niagara Falls Park, 1904. 

Manitoha — 

1. Report of the Department of Public Works for the year ended December 31, 
1903. 

Rritish Columbia — 

1. Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries for British Columbia for the year 
1904. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

1. Copy of statistical tables relating to emigration from and into the United 
Kingdom in 1903, and report of the Board of Trade thereon. 

2. General report and statistics of British mines and collieries for 1902 ; Part 
IV. — Colonial and foreign statistics. 

3. Supplement to the annual report of the Chief Inspector of Factories and 
Workshops for the year 1902 — returns of persons employed. 

4. Returns of cases of lead poisoning reported in china and earthenware works 
from 1899 to 1903. 

5. Twenty-eighth annual report of His Majesty's Inspectors of Explosives, 
1903. 

6. Reports of changes in rates of wages and hours of labour in the United King- 
dom in 1903, with comparative statistics for 1894-1902. 

7. Annual report of the Chief Inspector of Factories and Workshops for year 
1903; Part I. 

8. Charts illustrating statistics of trade, employment and conditions of labour 
in the United Kingdom, prepared for the St. Louis Exposition by the Commercial, 
Labour and Statistical Department of the Board of Trade. 

9. Statistical abstract for the principal countries of the world in the years from 
L892 to 1901. 

10. General report of statistics of mines and collieries for 1903; 1' XL — 
Labour. 

11. Report of the President of the Local Government Board on la of deal- 
ing with vagrancy in Switzerland. 

12. Return relating to technical education during the year 1902 



REPORT OF THE DEPCTT MIXISTEB OF LABOUR 29 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

13. Statistical abstract for the several British colonies, possessions and protector- 
ates in each year from 1889 to 1903. 

14. Second series of memoranda — tables and charts prepared by the Board of 
Trade with reference to matters bearing on British and foreign trade and industrial 
conditions. 

15. Second report of Mr. Wilson Fox on the wages, earnings and conditions of 
employment of agricultural labourers in the United Kingdom, with statistical tables 
and charts. 

16. Reports of the Chief Registrar of Friendly Societies for the year ended 
December 31, 1903. 

17. Returns of accidents and casualties reported to the Board of Trade by the 
several railway companies in the United Kingdom during the three months ended Sep- 
tember 30, 1904. 

18. Tenth abstract of labour statistics of the United Kingdom, 1902-1904. 

AUSTRALIA. 

1. Report by the Superintendent of the Government Labour Bureau of West 
Australia for the year ended December 31, 1903. 

2. Industrial arbitration, reports and records in New South Wales, 1904; Vol. 

NEW ZEALAND. 

1. Report of the Department of Labour, New Zealand, for 1904. 

UNITED STATES. 

1. Seventh annual report of the Department of Inspection of the State of 
Indiana, 1903. 

2. Report of the Bureau of Statistics of Labour for the State of Louisiana for 
1902-03. 

3. Fifth annual report of the Bureau of Labour Statistics of the Illinois Free 
Employment Offices for the year ended October 1, 1903. 

4. Sixth annual report of the Bureau of Labour and Industrial Statistics for 
the State of Virginia, 1903. 

5. Annual report of the State Board of Conciliation and Arbitration for the 
year ended December 31, 1903. 

6. Articles on wages and cost of living in the United States, published in Bulletin 
No. 53 of the Bureau of Labour, Washington. D.C. 

7. Report of New York State Department of Labour on the growth of industry 
in New York. 

8. Statistics of manufactures, 1902-03, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

9. Labour and industrial chronology of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
for the year ended September 30, 1903. 

10. Annual report of the Secretary of Internal Affairs of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania — industrial statistics, 1903. 

11. Exhibit of the Bureau of Labour at the St. Louis Purchase Exposition — bulle- 
tin of the Bureau of Labour, No. 54. 

12. Eighth biennial report of the Bureau of Labour of West Virginia, 1903-04. 

13. Fifth biennial report of the Bureau of Labour of the State of New Hamp- 
shire, 1904. 

14. Seventh annual report of the Bureau of Labour and Industrial Statistics of 
the State of Virginia, 1904. 

15. Eleventh biennial report of the Bureau of Labour Statistics of the State of 
California, 1904. 

16. First biennial report of the Bureau of Labour Statistics and Inspector of 
Factories and Workshops of the State of Oregon, 1903-04. 



30 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

17. Ninth biennial report of the Bureau of Labour Statistics of the State of Col- 
orado, 1903-04. 

18. Eighteenth annual report of the Bureau of Labour and Industrial Statistics 
for the State of Maine, 1904. 

19. Twentieth annual report of the Bureau of Labour Statistics of Connecticut 
for the year ended November 30, 1904. 

20. Twenty-seventh annual report of the Bureau of Statistics of Labour and In- 
dustries of New Jersey for the year ended October 31, 1904. 

21. Labour and Industrial Chronology of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for 
the year ended September 30, 1904. 

22. Tenth biennial report of the Indiana Department of Statistics for the year 
1903-04. 

23. Foreign commerce and navigation of the United States for the year ended 
June 30, 1904 — Department of Commerce and Labour Bureau of Statistics. 

24. Thirteenth annual report of the Bureau of Statistics and Information of 
Maryland. 

25. Ninth biennial report of the Bureau of Labour of the State of Minnesota, 
1903-04. 

26. Thirty-fifth annual report of the Bureau of Statistics of Labour of Massa- 
chusetts. 

27. Twenty-eighth annual report of the Bureau of Labour Statistics of the State 
of Ohio, 1904. 

28. Biennial report of the Bureau of Immigration, Labour and Statistics of Idaho 
for the year 1903-04. 

29. Resources of Nebraska — bulletin of the State Bureau of Labour and Indus- 
trial Statistics, No. 4, October, 1904. 

30. Eighteenth annual report of the Bureau of Labour and Printing of the State 
cf North 'Carolina, for the year 1904. 

BELGIUM. 

1. Rapports annuels de l'inspection du travail, 1903. 

2. Rapport relatif a l'execution de la loi du 31 mars 1898, sur les unions profes- 
sionelles pendant les annees 1898-1901, presente aux chambres legislatives par le min- 
istre de l'lndustrie et du Travail. 

3. Les salaires dans l'industrie Gantois; l'lndustrie de la filature du lin. 

4. Belgium, its institutions, industries and commerce; E. Roesel, 1904. 

FRANCE. 

1. Statistique annuelle du movement de la population en France, annee 1902. 

2. Statistique des greves et des recours a la conciliation ou a l'arbitrage, sur- 
venues pendant l'annee 1903. 

3. Annuaire statistique du Ministre du Commerce, de l'lndustrie, des Postes et des 
Telegraphes, 1903. _ 

4. Les associations professionelles ouvrieres; tome IV., 1904. 

GERMANY. 

1. German Workmen's Insurance as a social institution — guide to the workmen's 
insurance of the German Empire, and other pamphlets. 

LEGAL DECISIONS AFFECTING LABOUR. 

Brief accounts of the more important decisions affecting labour rendered in Cana- 
dian courts have been published from month to month, as in previous vc;irs. under the 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 31 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

heading ' Eecent legal decisions affecting labour.' Reference was made in this connec- 
tion during the year to over sixty decisions, the name of the prosecutor and defendant, 
the court in which the case was tried, the name of the presiding judge and the time 
and place of decision being generally cited. Certain of the more important decisions 
of the English and United States courts, of general interest to labour, were also briefly 
described. Among the subjects dealt with in the decisions reported this way during 
the year, the following may be mentioned : — 

Contributory negligence of employees, contraventions of the alien labour law, em- 
ployment of Chinese in mines, rights of workmen's associations, accidents caused by 
defective construction, breaches of contract, intimidation, the rights of apprentioes, 
breach of the Factories Act, breach of the Insurance Act by a non-registered union 
doing insurance business, actions against unions, employment of children, employees 
voluntarily accepting risk, liability for displaying wrong railway signals, liability of 
employers for accident, liability of employers for acts of employees, wrongful abandon- 
ment of employment, uncovered shafting, Sunday street cars, defective appliances, 
meaning of the word railway under the Workmen's Compensation Act, sale of work- 
men's tickets by street railway company, Drunkenness of Railway Employees, 
definition of term labourer or servant, conspiracy by a union, conspiracy of employers, 
defective railway ties, defective elevators, constitutionality of eight-hour day in the 
United States, equipment of railway cars, leaving of employment without stipulated 
notice, picketting, workmen's compensation, wrongful dismissal, employment of non- 
experienced men on dangerous work, Sabbath observance legislation, dismissal for dis- 
obedience, joint responsibility of workman and employer, enforcement of regulations, 
liability of directors of companies, mechanics lien for wages, validity of a Dominion 
Act preventing railway companies from being relieved from 'liability for damages for 
personal injuries to employees. 

OTHER FEATURES. 

A regular monthly review of recent industrial inventions was continued, and some 
improvements made over previous years in the manner in which the information was 
presented, in the way of classifying the inventions more completely according to the 
trades and industries to which they related. 

The Gazette also contained a list of the fair wages schedules included in govern- 
ment contracts, signed during the fiscal year; the total number of schedules published 
in this way being 133. 

A record of new unions formed was given each month. A special article review- 
ing the progress of labour organization in Canada during 1904 appeared in the Feb- 
ruary issue. Tables were included in this article in which a record of the unions 
formed and dissolved during the year was presented. These were accompanied by a 
number of smaller tables in which returns were analysed in detail from different points 
of view. In all, the number of unions formed amounted to 152, and unions dissolved 
to 104, leaving a net increase of 48 for the year. A comparison of these returns with 
the corresponding statistics for the year 1903 was added, the number of unions formed 
in the latter year being 275. By groups of trades, the largest number of unions 
formed was shown to have been in the building, metal and transport trades. 



32 DEPARTUEXT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



II.— CONCILIATION AND ARBITRATION. 

The intervention of the Department of Lahour under the Conciliation Act, 1900, 
was requested on only one occasion during the year 1904-05. This was in the case of a 
strike of the employees of the Dominion Iron and Steel Company at Sydney, C.B., 
which strike was the largest and most serious in the Dominion during the year. 

As shown elsewhere in this report, the number of industrial disturbances was less 
during 1904-05, in both number and importance, than in the years immediately preced- 
ing. In fact, with the exception of the strike at Sydney, in regard to which the depart- 
ment's intervention was requested, a strike of fishermen on the Skeena river in British 
Columbia during the first three weeks in July, 1904, and a strike in the building trades 
in Toronto during August and September, 1904, there were no industrial disputes com- 
parable with the large disputes in regard to which the department's intervention had 
been requested in previous years. 

In all, the friendly intervention of the Department of Labour had at the close of 
the fiscal year 1904-05 been requested on 37 occasions since the passing of the Act in 
July, 1900. 

SETTLEMENT OF STRIKE OF DOMINION IRON AND STEEL COMPANY'S EMPLOYEES AT SYDNEY, C.B. 

The strike of the employees of the Dominion Iron and Steel Company, at Sydney, 
C.B., commenced on June 1, 1904, and affected between 1,500 and 2,000 employees. For 
some time after the strike commenced, work on the company's plant was all but com- 
pletely suspended. During the month of July the militia were called in by the local 
authorities, and stationed near the company's works from July 4 until the settlement 
of the dispute on the 22nd, the force on the latter date numbering between 150 and 200 
men. 

According to the statement of the secretary of the Provincial Workingrnen's Asso- 
ciation, the cause of the dispute was the refusal of the company to grant a demand of 
its employees for a restoration of the scale of wages paid prior to December 1, 1903, on 
which date their wages were reduced. A demand for the restoration of the former 
scale was made by the Provincial Workingrnen's Association, to which the men be- 
longed, in the month of April, but was refused by the company. A strike was threatened 
during the month of May if the rates were not. restored, and, the company having 
refused to concede the demands, the strike took effect on June 1. 

The company claimed that the wages paid their employees compared favourably 

with wages for similar classes of work elsewhere, and stated that they were prepared 

i irate this point. The company also urged that on account of the condition of 

the steel industry it was impossible to give more. The men claimed that wages were 

higher in the United States and in the mining districts of Cape Breton, and that, 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 33 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

owing to the cost of living in Sydney, their earnings were not sufficient for the support 
of their families. They were unwilling, however, to submit to an arbitration restricted 
to particular points. 

In reply to the request of the Sydney Board of Trade, the Honourable the Minister 
of Labour communicated with the parties, extending the friendly offices of the depart- 
ment under the Conciliation Act in the event of the same being acceptable to the 
parties. The company, in acknowledging the receipt of the minister's communicatioBe 
set forth its view of the difficulties which had arisen, but was non-commital in its atti- 
tude towards government intervention under the Act. The agent of the men replied 
as follows : ' We prefer to be left to settle this dispute ourselves in our own way ; thanks 
for kind offer.' Upon receipt of these replies, copies were forwarded by the Minister of 
Labour to the Sydney Board of Trade, and regret was expressed at the apparent unwil- 
lingness of the parties to accept government intervention. In the same communication 
the minister stated it was possible the immediate intervention of any third party might 
not be desired, but that later on a different attitude might be taken, in which event the 
minister would be pleased to lend the friendly offices of the department. Further efforts 
were made by the Sydney Board of Trade to effect a settlement of the dispute, but 
without avail, and on July 4 the situation was further complicated by the bringing in 
of the militia for the alleged purpose of preventing violence and rioting. 

A somewhat lengthy correspondence between the men and the government took 
place during the first two weeks of July. Finally, on the 16th of the month, the men 
decided to accept the friendly offices of the department, and Mr. King, Deputy Minister 
of Labour, left Ottawa on the day following, to act as intermediary, arriving in Sydney 
on the evening of the 19th. 

On the following morning the deputy minister met the committee acting on behalf 
of the strikers, and had a lengthy interview with them, followed in the afternoon by a 
lengthy interview with the president and other officials of the Dominion Iron and Steel 
Company. These interviews were followed by others on the evening of the same day 
and the day following, with the result that he was in a position to inform the men and 
the company as to the attitude of the parties towards each other, and to give certain 
definite assurances as to what would be done in the event of the strike being declared 
off. 

Negotiations up to this point having justified the belief that a satisfactory settle- 
ment could be forthwith effected, a meeting of the sub-council of the Provincial Work- 
men's Association was called for the day following, July 22, in order that the com- 
mittee representing the strikers might make known to the sub-council the results of 
the negotiations conducted by the deputy minister between the parties, and that the 
sub-council might give a final decision in the matter. 

After the sub-council had convened on the morning of the 22nd, the committee of 
the strikers notified Mr. King in writing that the sub-council of the Provincial Work- 
men's Association was prepared to call the strike off in the event of the assurances 
given the committee being made to the sub-council in a form which they might regard 
as satisfactory. Mr. King thereupon wrote the company, setting forth what he under- 

36—3 



34 DEPAR1 UE\ T OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

stood the company's attitude would be, and asked for a written assurance as to the 
correctness of his view of their representations. Having received from 'the president 
of the company a reply confirming his understanding of the company's position, he 
informed the grand secretary in writing of the assurances given him by the company. 
The written statement sent by Mr. King corresponding with the verbal assurances 
given to the committee of the strikers, the sub-council of the Provincial Workmen's 
Association declared the strike at an end, and an official communication to that effect 
was given to Mr. King by the grand secretary, Mr. Moffatt. 

The assurances given by the company to its employees, through the deputy min- 
ister, were to the effect that the company would (1) reinstate employees in their former 
positions in so far as their positions might have remained unfilled up to the conclusion 
of the strike — this, however, without prejudice to the right of the company to decline 
to re-employ men who, prior to June 1, had been deemed inefficient or ineligible because 
of misconduct; (2) give employment to as many men as possible by operating the plant 
to the fulllest extent to which it was profitable to run it. In this connection the com- 
pany stated that they could not hold out much hope of getting the coke ovens and blast 
furnaces at work for some little time, but that it would be the company's policy, as far 
as possible, to give employment at other work at the wages paid for such work to men 
temporarily deprived of their regular employment; (3) not discriminate against any 
man because of his being a member of the Provincial Workmen's Association, or for 
the reason solely of his having been a participant in the strike ; (4) express to the local 
magistrates, who had called out the militia, the opinion that they would be justified in 
procuring the immediate recall of the troops stationed on or near the company's works. 

No increases in wages were granted, and it was understood that in future the com- 
pany would receive only committees of the company's own employees in connection 
with any questions arising on the plant, this being a policy which the company an- 
nounced shortly after the strike commenced. 

The presence of the militia at Sydney in connection with this strike is a matter 
which calls for more thau passing reference, inasmuch as the whole question of the 
interposition of the military power in industrial disputes is one which is liable to be 
misunderstood and grossly misrepresented. Interested parties have not hesitated to 
make use of the presence of the militia as a means of fomenting in the minds of work- 
ingmen a feeling of hostiliy towards the government, or towards the employers with 
whom at the time they might be contending. As a matter of fact, under the law as it 
stands, the responsibility of calling out the militia in such cases is one which must be 
placed in the first instance upon the local magistrates or justices of the peace. The 
function of the militia in connection with a strike is simply one of assisting the local 
authorities to maintain law and order, where those responsible for its maintenance 
are of opinion that the means which the community itself provides is insufficient. 
Inasmuch, however, as the calling in of the militia adds a very serious factor to rela- 
tions already sufficiently strained, and is certain to arouse prejudice and even bitter- 
ness in the minds of the workingmen towards their employers, as well as towards the 
state, and the militia itself, it is desirable in the interests of the truest patriotism, no 
less than for reasons connecting themselves with any existing industrial dispute, that 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 35 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

this step should be taken with the greatest caution, and certainly only under impera- 
tive necessity. In this connection the facts relating to the presence of the militia 
during the strike at Sydney and the representations made in reference thereto at the 
time, are not without special interest. 

There were at Sydney practically no disturbances of a threatening kind during the 
month of June. When, however, the company made efforts early in July to recommence 
operations under the protection of the local police force, the police commissioners 
reported that the circumstances were such as to render the local police inadequate to 
give the protection required. At the request of three local magistrates, made to the dis- 
trict officer commanding, the local militia were called out, in accordance with authority 
given by statute, to assist in maintaining peace and order. On the following day the 
authorities asked for reinforcements, and about 200 additional troops were despatched 
from Halifax, arriving at Sydney early on the morning of the 6th. On July 12, on 
representation being made that the troops might be required for some time, the local 
militia were replaced by regulars from Quebec, so that the members of the militia 
would not be obliged to be absent from their customary employments for any length 
of time. 

The replacing of the local militia by members of the permanent force, gave rise 
to the impression in some quarters that the government would meet the expenses of 
their maintenance while in Sydney, whereas the Act requires the municipality call- 
ing out the militia in aid of the civil authorities to bear all expenses in connection 
therewith. To prevent any misconception on this point, the Deputy Minister, while 
in Sydney, wired to Ottawa for exact information, so as to remove any misunderstand- 
ing which might exist, and received a reply from the Honourable the Minister of Militia 
stating that all expenses in connection with the troops, whether members of the local 
militia or permanent force, would have to be borne by the municipality. The tele- 
gram received by the Deputy Minister of Labour from the Honourable the Minister 
of Militia and Defence was as follows: — 

Ottawa, Ont., July 21, 1904. 
To W. L. Mackenzie King, 

Sydney, N.S. 

There is no understanding of any kind exempting the municipality from payment 
of any part of expenses connected with attendance of local militia and permanent 
force at Sydney. Consequently, municipality must, in compliance with the law, pay 
all expenses, such as pay of men, subsistence and transportation of both local militia 
and permanent force. 

(Sgd.) F. W. BORDEN, 

Minister of Militia. 

Before the settlement of the dispute the Deputy Minister of Labour received 
assurances from the company that the company would use its influence to have the 
troops immediately withdrawn in the event of the strike being declared at an end, and 
assurance was also given by the local magistrates that they would authorize the imme- 
diate withdrawal of the troops in the event of the strike being declared at an end. 
The strike was declared off at half-past six on the evening of Friday, July 22, and at 
7 o'clock the following morning the regulars returned to Quebec. 

36—3* 



36 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
The Dominion Iron and Steel Works being one of the most important industries 
of the maritime provinces, the strike of its employees and subsequent shut-down of the 
works had a depressing effect upon conditions generally. Among industries seriously 
affected were the iron ore mines at Wabana. the quarries at Marble mountain and 
Georges river and the works of the Dolomite quarry and of the Dominion Tar and 
Chemical Company. The municipality of Sydney suffered heavily in consequence of 
the strike, which also brought an immediate financial loss of many thousands of dol- 
lars to the company, and a similar loss in wages to the employees. Had the strike not 
been terminated when it was it is difficult to say what depression in business and hard- 
ships to individuals might not have followed in its wake. 

The following table, which is similar in form to the tables published in the re- 
ports of previous years, indicates the number and nature of the disDutes in regard to 
which the friendly intervention of the department was requested under the Concilia- 
tion Act during 1904-05, together with particulars as to the nature of their settlement 
or disposition: — 






REPORT OF TEE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 



37 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



id r- 



Z- - 

r ij - 

- ' V. 

- ~ 

z ■/ — 

- ^ K 



2| E 



30 






x 

-: 



'jaarasn jas jo aivri 



Z S5 



63 Z 

DO ■£. 

= < 

— M 

Z* 

- :£ 



- s 



~ — 

- - 





- 


3 


r 


1 


En 


— 


r 


— 


- 
















































SJ 






















: 


- 




z 




n 




= 


- 






















(I 


'/ 

c 


bj 


3 


=■ 


z 


- 




z 


=1 


i 


- 


z 






-. £ 


— 


- 




a 


.- 


- 


X 


S. 


— 


~ 


■~ 


- 




— 




- 


- 






— 


— 


~ 


':: 


~ 


— 


- 


tj 


- 


- 




7 

c 


j 


M 


5 


r 




_ 


- 


* 


Z 


- 


z. 


; 




~ 


- 


is 


r 




~ 


be 


a 


X 


~ 


£ 




- 




= 


— 


z 


, 


^ 


£ 


I 




< 


i 




V 






























































a 


--. 


~ 


- 


•7 


— 


- 


B 


=? 










■jnara 
-ueclap jo noil 
naijaiut 10 ai«a 



ino 

■^."Wl JO 35[TJqS 

jo laatnaouara 
J-raoo 10 33«Q 



2,4 



be r .- — 



rE : : : 



sgoos 
3 r'_— £ 



g 






= •7 



38 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



m. FAIR WAGES ON PUBLIC CONTRACT WORK. 

During the year the fair wages officers of the department prepared fair wages 
schedules for insertion in 248 separate contracts, awarded hy or to be awarded by 
the different departments of the government. To some of these contracts there were 
several schedules attached. As, for example, where, in connection with construction, a 
railroad was to pass through several localities and the rates of wages current in the 
different localities varied, separate schedules governing particular areas were re- 
quired in connection with the one contract. The total number of schedules prepared 
was thus considerably greater than is indicated by the number of contracts in which 
these schedules were inserted. The total number of schedules prepared was greater 
than in any previous year, the number being 248 in the fiscal year 1904-05, as compared 
with 223 in the year 1903-04, 73 in the year 1902-03, and 31 for the year 1901-02. 

In most cases the rates of wages were ascertained by a personal visit of the fair 
wages officer to the localities in which the wo"k was to be undertaken, and after con- 
sultation with both contractors and men. Section 205 of the Railway Act, 1903 (3 
Edward VTL, c. 58), requiring the payment to mechanics, labourers or others per- 
forming labour in the work of construction, of such wages as are generally accepted 
as current for competent workmen in the district in which the work is being performed 
in every case in which the parliament of Canada votes financial aid by way of subsidy 
or guarantee towards the cost of railway construction, occasioned the preparation of a 
larger number of schedules for the Department of Railways and Canals than were re- 
quired in previous years, requests having been received for schedules in- connection 
with 155 contracts or subsidy agreements by that department. Schedules for insertion 
in contracts for public buildings and public works were prepared to the number o'f 72 
for the Public Works Department, and 21 schedules were prepared for insertion in con- 
tracts by the Department of Marine and Fisheries. 

In addition to schedules prepared for insertion in contracts, the Department of 
Labour was frequently consulted during the year by other departments of the govern- 
ment in connection with expenditures incurred by these departments in the carrying 
out of special work by officers immediately in their own employ. Accounts for services 
rendered by local tradesmen in localities where the work was not of a sufficiently im- 
portant nature to justify the calling for tenders with a view to awarding a contract, 
were referred before payment to the department, that opportunity might be given of 
certifying, where labour had been charged for, that the rates specified were correct The 
greatest number of references of this kind were made by the Department of Mili- 
tia and Defence. The Department of Labour also investigated and certified as to the 
fairness of rates of wages being paid by firms furnishing supplies or performing work 
under contract to the Post Office Department. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF I. IBOUR 



39 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

To facilitate the answering of inquiries as to the current rates of wages and hours, 
ihe fair wage officers collected information for a very large number of localities. This 
information has been classified in such a way as to enable the department to have at 
hand an immediate source of reference. As rates in particular localities are subject 
to considerable change where a number of trades are concerned, it has been necessary, 
in order to make the data collected in previous years of service in this connection, to 
subject the whole to constant revision. Work of this kind has claimed much of the 
time and attention of the fair wages officers, when not engaged in the preparation of 
schedules for specific contracts. Inquiries as to rates of wages and hours of empL >y- 
ment have been received, not only from departments of the government and public 
bodies, but from individuals in Canada and foreign countries; in some cases from 
workingmen desirous of commencing work in a particular locality, and in other cases 
from manufacturing establishments or persons interested in industrial undertakings in 
this country. 

The following tables show the number of schedules prepared by the fair wages 
officers during the fiscal year 1904-05, by provinces, and as compared with previous 
years: — 



Department of Labour, Canada. 
Statistical Tables, V. A. R. No. 2. 

STATISTICAL TABLK SHOWING BY PROVINCES THE 'FAIR WALKS' SCHEDULES PRE- 
PARED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR Fill; OTHER DEPARTMENTS <>F THE 
GOVERNMENT DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1905. 



Department of Go^ ernmi at. 


— 

o 

X 

- 



y 


- 
-- -i 

Z 

a 


■a 

J 

- 


o 

y 


& 

O 


— 
z 

-. 

- 


X 

y.'z 

o 
H 


_ r. 
~'5 
B ~ 

— ~z 
O 


> 


- 
Eh 


Public Works 


15 
47 
12 


7 
IS 

1 


3 
14 

2 


8 
48 

1 


32 
23 

3 
1 


3 


.3 


1 

'-' 
1 


1 


72 




153 




1 




21 




1 




1 
















1 
























7.', 


26 


19 


57 


59 


4 


3 


4 


1 


248 



Department ok Labour, Canada. 
Statistical Tables, V. A. R., Xo. 3. 

STATISTICAL TABLE OF -FAIR WAGES' SI HEM 1.1 - PR] PARED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF 
LABOUR FOROTHl-R DEPARTMENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT, DURING THE YEARS 
JULY, 190>TOJUNE, 1905, [NCLUSIVE. 






1900 hi 


1901 02. 




1903 04. 


1904 05 






63 


13 

17 

1 


11 
12 

■ill 


in; 

is 

B9 


'.'I 

15:1 

2 


275 


Marine and Fisheries 


68 
293 






2 















63 


31 


: 


223 


248 


638 



40 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
LABOUR CONDITIONS INSERTED IN PUBLIC CONTRACTS. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

The following conditions, framed in pursuance of the Pair-Wages Resolution of 
the House of Commons, of March, 1900, were incorporated in and formed part of each 
of the several contracts hereinafter mentioned as having been awarded by the Depart- 
ment of Public Works, for the year ended June 30, 1905 : — 

1. The contractor shall not assign or sub-let this contract, or any part or parts 
thereof, for the execution of all or any portion of the work included in said contract, 
and no pretended assignment or sub-contract will be recognized or in any way affect any 
of the following conditions or other provisions of the said contract. 

2. All workmen employed upon the work comprehended in and to be executed pur- 
suant to the said contract shall be residents of Canada, unless the minister is of opinion 
that Canadian labour is not available, or that emergencies or other special circum- 
stances exist which would render it contrary to public interest to enforce the foregoing 
condition in respect of the employment of resident Canadian workmen. 

3. No workman employed upon the said work shall at any time be paid less than 
the minimum rate of wages set forth in the fair wages schedule following. 

FAIR WAGES SCHEDULE. 



TRADE OR CLASS OF LABOUR. 



(Here set forth a complete list of different 
classes of workmen to be employed on the 
work.) 



RATE OF W.*GES. 
Xot less than the following rate per 



4. The foregoing schedule is intended to include all the classes of labour required 
for the performance of the work, but if any labour is required which is not provided 
for by any of the items in the above schedule, the minister, or other officer authorized 
by him, whenever and as often as the occasion shall arise, shall have the power to fix 
the minimum rate of wages payable in respect of any such labour, which minimum 
rate shall not be less than tin- rate of wages generally accepted as current in each trade 
or class of labour for competent workmen in the district where the work is being car- 
ried out. 

5. The contractor shall not be entitled to payment of any money which would 
otherwise be payable under the terms of the said contract in respect of work and labour 
performed in the execution of the said contract, unless and until he shall have filed in 
the office of the minister in support of his claim for payment a statement showing the 
names, rate of wages, amounts paid and amounts (if any) due and unpaid for wages 
for work and labour done by any foreman, workman, labourer or team, employed upon 
the said work, and such statement shall be attested by the statutory declaration of the 
said contractor, or of such other person or persons as the minister may indicate or re- 
quire; and the contractor shall from lime to time furnish to the minister such further 
detailed information and evidence a- the minister may deem necessary, in order to 
satisfy him that the conditions herein contained to secure the payment of fair wages 
have been complied with, and thai the workmen so employed as aforesaid upon the por- 
tions of the work in respect of which payment is demanded have been paid in full. 

6. In the event of default being mad. in payment of any money owing in respect 
of wages of any foreman, workman or labourer, employed on the said work, and if a 
claim therefor is filed in the office of the minister, and proof thereof satisfactory to 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER or LABOUR 41 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

the minister is furnished, the said minister may pay such claim out of the moneys at 
any time payable by His Majesty under said contract, and the amounts so paid shall 
be deemed payments to the contractor. 

7. Xo portion of the work shall be done by piece-work. 

s . The number of working hours in the day or week shall be determined by the 
custom of the trade in the dictrict where the work is performed for each of the dif- 
ferent classes of labour employed upon the work. 

9. The workmen employed in the performance of the said contract shall not be 
required to work for longer hours than those fixed by the custom of the trade in the 
district where the work is carried on. except for the protection of life or property, or 
in case of other emergencies. >^ 

10. These conditions shall extend and apply to moneys payable for the use or hire 
of horses or teams, and the persons entitled to payment for the use or hire of horses or 
teams shall have the like rights in respect of moneys so owing them as if such moneys 
were payable to them in respect of wages. 

11. The contractor shall not be entitled to payment of any of the money which 
otherwise would be payable under the terms of the said contract in Tespect of any goods 
or materials supplied, unless and until he shall have filed in the office of the minister, 
in support of his claim for payment, a statement showing the prices and quantities of 
all the goods and materials supplied for the performance of the work, and the amounts 
paid and amounts (if any) due and unpaid for such goods and materials, the names 
and addresses of the vendors, and such other detailed information and evidence at- 
tested by a statutory declaration of the said contractor, or of such other person or 
persons as the minister may indicate or require, or may deem necessary in order to 
satisfy him that the conditions herein contained have been complied with, and that the 
goods and materials supplied for the portion of the work in respect of which payment 
is demanded have been paid for in full. 

12. In the event of default being made in payment of any money owing in respect 
of goods and materials supplied for the work in the execution of the said contract, and 
if a claim therefor is filed in the office of the minister, and proof of such claim satis- 
factory to the minister is furnished, the minister may, out of the moneys at any time 
payable by His Majesty under said contract, pay, or cause to be paid, such claim, and 
the amounts so paid shall be deemed payments to the contractor. 

During the fiscal year 1904-05 the department received 72 requests for fair wages 
sch> m the Department of Public Works for insertion in contracts to be 

awarded and all of which schedules were supplied. The following is a list of the con- 
tracts in question, taken from the records of the department, giving the nature of the 
work being contracted for, the locality where it was to be carried on. and the date at 
which th< schedule requested was supplied : — 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1905 

Department of Labour. C'axaha. 
Statistical Tables, V. A.R.. No. 4. 

LIST OF CONTRACTS FOR WHICH FAIR WAGES SCHEDULES WERE REQUESTED BY THE 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND PREPARED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF 
LABOUR DURING THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1905. 



Nature of Work. 



Military magazine. 
Public building 



Military magazine 

Armoury 

Victoria memorial museum . 
Dominion archives 
Armoury 



Toronto. Out 

London, < tot 
Winnipeg. Man.. 
Moose Jaw, N.W.T.. 
Prince Albert. N.W.T 

Levis, Que 

Winnipeg. Man 

■■■ k. N.B.... 
Ottawa. Out 



Mint 

Pile and crib work.. 



Lot ality. 



Date of 

lying 
5i hedule. 



laoi 
August 

July 

August 
Sept. 
August 
July 



Armoury building. 



Drill ball 

Public building 

Militao ~I.,blr. 

Addition to London posl offlci 

Public building. 



Postal store building 

Extension in western block 

Drill hall 

1'nblic building 



Military store. 

Military building 

\. Mm ion to printing bureau 
Transit bouse, Dominion observatory. 
Addition to drill ball 

:: of dredges. 
Wiring. &c, printing bureau 
Construction of quarters [or married non-commissioned 

officers and men at Fort Osborne 

tion oi '.'A\ public building 
public building 
hi-u posl office 
public building.. 



Chatham. On) Sept. 

Guelph) Onl . 
Fredericton, N.B 

Ottawa. Out. 

Port Greville, N.S. 
Wallace Harbour, N.S 

Apple River. N.S. 

Freeport, N.S 

Bear River. N.S 

Devil's Island. N.s 
Newport Landing. N.s 
Habitant River, N.s 
w esl Arichat, N.s 

Jet je3 i love, N.s i ictober 

Bay St. Lawrence. N.S. Sept 

Baddi ck, N.s 

st. lvui - Bay, P.E.l 
McPherson I ove, l'.E.I... 

.Man's Bay, N.B 

Quaco Harbour. N.B, 
Shippegan Harbour, N.B.. 
Richibucto Harbour, N.B. 
Durham Harbour, N.B. ... 
3 okes Hay. Out 
Port Stanley. Out.. 

Hamilton Bay. Ont 

Rondea u. * Int 
Port Dover, Out. 
Toronto. Ont 
Petewawa, * Inl 
Echo Hay. Ont. 
Woodstock, < Hit 
Stratford, Ont. .. 
St Hyaeinthe, Que 
Hawkesbury, l hit 
Kingston, i Mil. 
I Ion, i n. i 

inish, N.s 

St. Johns, Que 
Montreal, Que. 
Ottawa, Ont 

• -. t)ne 
» Ihicoutimi, Que. 
Sand ivieh, < Int March 

\n! igonish, N.s January 

\\ innipeg, Man.. I i 

London, Onl March 

... Ont Febry. 



Sept 
October 

Sepl 
i ictobei 



Moi 



January 



Toronto. Onl 
Ottawa, i int. 



an post office postal station 

Pncuinal Ic station building. . 
Addition to custom house 
Extension to posl office 
Addition to goi ernmenl house 



Winnipeg, Man., 
si. Johns, Que 

VlllH Hll\ CI . lt.( 

Toronto, ont 

s is, P.E.I. 

CaiiMi. N.S. 
Toronto, i >n( 
Montreal, Quo 
Toronto, lint 

Alta June 

Ottawa, urn. August 



4 

4 
11 
22 
21 

- 
11 

- 
15 
It 
15 
16 
11 

- 

j i 
J t 
24 
24 
24 

24 

Jl 

-'I 

5 
24 
'-•4 
Jt 
24 
24 
Jl 
24 
24 
24 

6 
3i 

30 
12 
18 
15 
13 
14 
29 
28 
24 
24 
16 
.'I 
J4 

1 



March 



April 
March 

April 



Maj 



REPORT OF TEE DEPVTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 



43 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

The following statement, prepared by the Department of Public Works, shows the 
number of contracts awarded by the department during the year 1904-05, which con- 
tained fair wages schedules supplied by the Department of Labour, together, in the 
case of each contract, with the locality of the work, the date at which the contract was 
entered into, and the amount of the contract. In many cases the schedules inserted in 
these contracts were published in the Labour Gazette after the contract had been 
awarded. Where such has been the case, reference is made to the page of the Gnzette 
at which these schedules appeared. 

Depabtmknt of Labour. Canada. 
I isni ai. Tables. V. A. K. No. 5. 

LIST OF CONTRA! TS LET HY THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS OF CANADA, FROM 
JUNE 30. 1901, TO JUNE 30, 1905, I ONTAINING "FAIR WAGES S< HEDULE," OB LABOUR 
CONDITIONS AS TO WAGES TO BE PAID. 



Nature of Work. 



Locality. 



Landing wharf New Richmond, P.Q. 

Wharf - I deonles lies, P.Q 

Wharf of crib work, etc Tnessalon, Onl 

Boat landing wharf Breton Cove. N.s. 

Deep water wharf Dalhousie, N.B 

Breakwater Goderich, Ont. 



Landing pier. 

Post Office building. . . 

Breakwater 

Immigration building. 

Hospital Qua. Station Partridge Island, St, John, N.B. 

Two detention building- " 

l'i'-t Office, etc.. building. Oshawa,Ont 

Armoury ...... Burford, Ont 



Repentigriy, Que.. 

St. Louis du Mile End, P.Q. 

Meaford, Ont 

Winnipeg Man. 



Breakwater, 

Landing pier. 

Wharf 

Public building 
Archives building 

Public building 

Wharf 

Post Office building. 
Public building . 
Deep water wharf . 

Crib wharf 

Drill Hall 

Approach to isolated crib. 

Close faced timber wharf. 



Dipper Harbour, N.B 
St Jean di - I baillons, P.Q 
Chamboi.l, P.Q 
Longueuil, P.Q 

Ottawa. Out 
Campbellton. N.B 
North Gut, St. Anns, N.S 
Sydney Mines, C.B., \ - 

burg, ' tat 

I .Mi! bellton, N.B 

Bracebridge, Ont 

Woodstock, N.B 

St. simoon. P.Q. 
St. Fidele, P.Q 
Perce, P.Q 

Terrebonne. P.Q ... 

Winnipeg, Man 
Stokes Bay. (lot 



Extension to pier 

Po-t Office building.. 
Excavation for Post Office bl'dg. 
Wharf and road approach 

Arniourv Woodstock, Ont 

Stratford, Ont 

Drill Hall. Fredericton, N.B 

Amherstburg, ' tat 
. eville, v 



Dredging 

Extension to breakwater, 

Pile wharf 

Magazine 

Armour] Virden, Man 

Pile wharf and approacl Petewawa, Ont 

Immigration building Halifax, N.S 

Kuya) Victoria Museum Ottawa. Ont 



Echo Bay, I tat 
Winnipeg, Man 



Landing pi' r Deschambault, P.O. 

Extension to wharf Grand River, P.E.I. 

Wharf McP ...I '.E.I 



Mint Ottawa, Onl 

Channel protection works skir r's Cove N.S 

Wharf ' St Alexis, P.Q 

Public bail, ling Moosi Jaw, \.v\ I. 

kesbury, ' tat 
Prince Albert. N.W.T.. 
Drill Hall C'hathan 

Post Office building Levis, Que 



Winnipeg, Man. 

Wharf Grondines, l' q 

stone lifter.. For Public Works Department 

Drill II - II tie, P.Q 







Issue of 




Amount of 


III \\1:' h r ,)T 


Contract. 


Cont i 


Schedule 






publ 


shed. 


19 4. 


S 


Volume 


Page. 


• 


14,400 00 


V 


411 




•i on 


V 


411 


" 14... 


19,000 00 


V 


411 




.,."., im 


V 


111 


! - ' 


12.1 00 00 


V 


41-2 


• 


74,il0l 1 i i 






■■ 10 


. 


V 


412 


- 23... 


18,790 ini 


V 


413 


" 23 ... 





V 


U3 


" 22... 


147,000 00 


V 


412 


" 26 


■ . oo 


V 


411 


26 


16,995 no 


V 


413 


Sept. 2 . . 


20,51 


V 


411 


■' 19 


9,901 I.e.) 






' 21 


15,385 00 






" 21 


33,233 00 


V 


114 


22 


«) .ii 


V 


512 


'■ 2- 


1. ,500 no 


V 


41a 


• 29 


l!l.s. ; ,7 00 


V 


415 


- 30 


16.600 00 


V 


416 


29 


1,850 00 


v 


415 


29 


lB.T.Mi 00 


V 


116 


Oct. 3.... 


15,11 i 


V 


416 


" 11. 


35,300 on 


V 


513 


" 31 


8,200 00 


V 


512 


- 


SO 00 


V 


631 


" 28 


19,062 67 


V 


631 


" 26. 


15.266 i«> 


V 


513 


- 31 


19,441 20 


V 


631 


Nov. 25 


11,550 no 


V 


632 


.. ^ 


4,993 no 


V 


768 


' 29. 


8,500 noil. c.l 








19,935 ' 1 


V 


770 


- 25. 


93 00 


V 


771 


Dec 7 


12,955 00 


V 


769 


9. 




V 


768 


■■ 12 


11,460 ini 


V 


7117 


' 11 


17,476 00 (Lai 






• 14 


4, 


V 




11 


6,449 






.. x 


6,197 00 0-c.) 






• 22. 


■ no 


V 


769 


.. 28 


•i INI 


V 


770 


•• 16. 


15,840 OOO.c.1 






■• 27 


■Ml. c.l 








' 


V 


767 


1905. 








Ian. 5.... 


263,191 io 


V 




0. 


10,985 no 


V 


807 


1 


17,48! I.e.) 






■' 13. 


13 00 


V 


908 




|| INI 


V 


908 


■ 21 


... 


V 


909 


" 30.... 


50,905 '"I 


V 


mis 




22, ni 


V 


1019 


•■ 24. 


- . HO 


V 


nil!i 


Mar. 1 


II.: I.e.) 


1 




•• 25 


on 


V 


1149 


" 25 


5(1,000 ini 


V 


111- 



44 



DEPART JI EXT OF LABOUR 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
LIST OF CONTRACTS LET BY THK DEPARTMENT ny PUBLIC WORKS.— Con. 



Nature of Work. 



Locality. 







I--ue of 


Date oi 


Amount of 


Labour Gazette 






in wh 


eh 1- air 


Contract 


Contract. 


w ages 


Schedule 






publ 


shed. 


A]iril 4. 


- 126 00(l.c) 






' 10. .. 


75,000 00 


V 


128 i 


■ 


■ i 00 


V 


128: 


'■ 11 


"00 


V 


1285 


17 


.-. Ml 


V 


1285 


May 1 


52,500 i" 


V 


1286 


1 


19,009 00 O.C.) 






" 2 


■ Ofl.e 1 






■ 9 


6,990 


V 


1395 


12 


43.2 * ■ no 


V 


1396 


: 


14,789 00 


V 


1396 


■ 16 


23.92S 






June 12 


11.4^1 00 






■ la 


14,99li 00 






• IS) 


9g 100 






- 20 


17,700 






'22 


13,7 00 (I.e.) 







Concrete piers and abutments. 

Additions to West Block 

Stable for "B' Battery 

Alterations to Post < MHce 

Pile wharf ... ... 

Drill Hall 

Extension to breakwater 

Alterations to wing of Pub. bl'g. 
Stable forRoyal MilitaryCollege 
Additional story. Printing Bur. 

Transit House 

Military Store building. 
Post Office building. 



Breakwater. 

Wharf 

Breakwater. 



Battleford, N.W.T 

Ottawa. Out . . 
Kingston. Out 
London. ' ml 
Parrv Sound. < >nt 
Time Rivers, P.Q.. 

Gabarns. N.S 

Yarmouth, X. 

Kingston. Ont 

Ottawa. Ont 



Winnipeg. Man 
Sandwich, Ont 
Antigonish. N.S 
Derils Island. X. 
1 lurham, N.B. 
r'reeport. \ - 



" Prepared by Department of Public Works. 

I.e. Stand* f-u " labour conditions where schedule was not included. 



DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND CAN A I -. 

The following conditions, framed in pursuance of the Fair Wages Resolution of 
the House of Commons (1900), and Chap. 58, section 205, 3 Edward VII.. concerning 
the payment of current wages to mechanics, labourers, or other persons performing 
labour in connection with work of construction under subsidy or guarantee, were incor- 
porated in and formed part of the several contracts hereinafter mentioned as having 
been awarded by the Department of Railways and Canals during the year ended .Tune 
30, 1905 :— 

20. ISTo labourers shall be employed on or about the works hereby contracted for 
who are not citizens or residents of Canada, but the minister may in writing waive the 
provisions of this clause, either in general or to a limited extent, should he deem it ex- 
pedient so to do. 

21. The minimum rate of wages to be paid by the contractor for the labour of any 
employee, or the minimum rate of hire for auy team employed in or about the 
works, shall be the rate specified in the fair wi ng schedule ' A ' at- 
tached to and forming part of this contract), for the same or similar class of labour as 
that in which such employee is engaged or for the hire of teams, respectively. 

22. Tlit' number of working hours for employees m the day or week shall be in ac- 
cordance with the custom for the same or similar trades or classes of labour in the 
district where the work is being carried on — to be determini d in case of dispute by the 
minister; and no employee shall be required to work for longer hours except for the 
protection of life or property, or, in case of other emergencies, when the nee 
therefor is confirmed by the engineer. 

23. In case any labour is required in or about the works for which, in the opinion 
of the engineer, no rate is fixed in the -ni .1 schedule, the engineer, or other officer 
authorized by him, may fix the minimum rate ,>( wages payable in respect th 
which shall not be less than the rate of wages generally accepted as current for compe- 
tent workmen in the same or similar trades or class,- of labour in the district where 
the work is being carried on. 



REl'ORT OF THE DEPVTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 45 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

24. The contractor shall not be entitled to any payments under this contract in 
respect of work and labour performed until he has filed in the office of the engineer a 
statement, in duplicate, showing the rates of wages by him paid for the various classes 
of labour, and the hire of teams employed in or about the work, and, if any amounts 
should then be due and unpaid in respect of such wages or hire, showing in detail the 
names of the unpaid employees, the class of employment, rates of wages, and the 
amounts due to each ; nor shall the contractor be entitled to any payments under this 
contract in respect of materials or other things supplied for use in or upon the works 
until he has filed in the office of the engineer a statement, in duplicate, showing the 
prices and quantities of all such materials or things, and, if any amounts should then 
be due and unpaid in respect thereof, showing in detail the names of the unpaid 
vendors, the quantities, prices, and the amounts due to each. Such statements shall be 
attested, in duplicate, by the statutory declaration of the contractor, or of such other 
persons as the minister may approve. 

25. The minister, or the engineer, may, as a further condition to such payment, 
at any time require the contractor to furnish such further or other detailed informa- 
tion as may be necessary to establish to his satisfaction the compliance by the con- 
tractor with the conditions of this contract. 

26. Should the contractor fail to adhere in every particular to the fair wages sche- 
dule hereto annexed, or permit any wages or amounts payable for the hire of teams to 
become or remain in arrear and unpaid, or fail to pay any accounts for materials or 
other things supplied for the works, the engineer may give notice in writing requiring 
the contractor to adhere to such schedule, or to pay such wages, or for such hire of 
teams, or for such materials or other things, as the case may be. Should the contractor 
fail for the period of forty-eight hours after the giving of such notice to comply with 
the terms thereof, the minister may make such payments as shall be sufficient to effect 
an adherence with such schedule, or the settlement or discharge of such arrears, or in- 
debtedness for hire or materials or things supplied, and the contractor in the event of 
any such payments being made after notice and default as aforesaid shall be estopped 
from setting up, as against His Majesty, the accuracy of any amounts so paid or the 
existence or extent of any such indebtedness, and all amounts so paid shall be Tepaid, 
at once, by the contractor, or may be deducted from any amounts then or thereafter 
due by His Majesty to the contractor. 

27. The minister or the engineer may, in his discretion, at any time require 
proof, with such formalities or to such extent as he may deem requisite, of any claim 
under the said fair wages schedule, or for wages or hire of teams in arrears, or of ac- 
counts for materials, or other things, unpaid. 

FAIR WAGES SCHEDULE. 
The following is the minimum rate of wages to be paid respectively for the several classes 
of labour mentioned, or for the hire of teams, in accordance with the provisions of the fair 
wages clauses : — 



CLASS OF LABOUR. 



MINIMUM RATE. 



During the fiscal year 1904-05, the Department of Labour received from the 
Department of Railways and Canals 153 requests for fair wages schedules to be in- 
serted in contracts or subsidy agreements to be entered into by that department. 

The following i> a list taken from the records of the Department of Labour of 
the several contracts or subsidy agreements to which the fair wages schedules requested 
were intended to apply, the localities of the work, and the dates at which the several 
schedules were supplied by the Department of Labour : — 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

Department of Labour. Canada, 
Statistical Tables, V. A. R.— Xo. 6. 
LIST OF .CONTRACTS FOR WHICH FAIR WAGES SCHEDULES WERE REQUESTED BY THE 
W^^^^M^^M^f^M^^S. PREPARED BY THE DEPARTMENT 



Nature of Work. 



Locality. 



Lachine Canal. Que 
P. E. I. Railway, P. E. 



Bayfield Road. X. s 
Levis. Que 



, B 

St. Moise. Que 

Salmon Lake, Que 

Chatham Junction. X. B. 
Cornwall. Out 



Raising part of new St. Gabriel Shed 

Pipe-laying at certain stations 

Construction of I. C. R. station, and converting of present sta 

tion into freight shed 

Induced draft apparatus for I. C. R. boiler-room! _ 

Construction of a creosoted pile wharf Halifax X 

Erection of brick building for stores and offices for I. (.'. R St. John N 

Erection of freight shed for I. C. R 

Erection of station and dwelling for I. C. R. 

Erection of freight shed for I. C. R ,'.,'_ 

Erection of repair shop building for the St. Lawrence canals 
Erection of an office building for the St. Lawrence canals , 
Supply of pipes, fittings, valves. See., and labour in connection 

with I. C. R. engine house St. John. V. B 

Erection of engine house on I. C, R.. Pirate Harbour V S 

Erection of station Alberton. P. E. I 

1. C. R. office and stores building ... .... Pirate Harbour X s 

I. C . R. station and baggage-room Stellarton, X. S 

Constructing crib work protection I Point Tupper. X. S .' 

Pipes, fittings, valves and labour in placing same, I. C. R I ! C i la, iS i * r ? Junction, Que. '.'.'.'. 

engine house -MSte. Mavie, Que 

,, .. . ,, ,,.',' ,". I Riviere du Loup, Que 

Erection of coal-house with hoisting machinery for I. C. R. . . Sydney, X. S. 
Rebuilding wharf, npper entrance of Grenville canal. . . Greuville, Que 

changes and additions to the electric installation at North! 

street, Halifax. N.S., in connection with I. C. R Halifax. V. S 

i lorterete substructures for the proposed swing bridges over 

the W elland canal I. . Marlatt's Crossing and Allan 

.. , burg, Ont 

Improvement of channel west of upper entrance to canal Cornwall. Ont 

I instruction of concrete dam Poonamalie Lock, Rideau can 

al. Ont 
I instruction of concrete retaining wall at Basin No. 1. 

action of quay wall of crib- work for I. C. R 

Fan system of heating for the I. C. R. engine-houses 



Date of 
Supplying 
Schedule. 



1904-05. 
July lfi 

25 



August 



Sept. 

August 

Sept. 



August 



Sept. 



Construe! inn of railway from Braccbridge toapoint at or near 
Baysville, Ont 

Construction of railway from a point on Joggins railway near 
the River Herbert railway to village of Alinudie '. 

Erection by Chateauguay & Northern Railway < to. of railway 
bridge 



Construction of railway from Bruce Mines Junction to Bruce 
Mines 



Enlarging regulating weir at Lock Xo. 17 
Construction of railway station, I. C.E 
Combined station and freight shed for I. i . i; 
Erection of freight shed lor LC.B 

< lonstrucion of freight -lied- for I. < . i: 

Installation of converting outfit 



\\ tdemng and deepening channel between east end of revet- 
ment wall and west end of old lock No. 17 

( Irib-work and broken 

in I ion of extension to freight shed and cm , i oil ,ii . r 

platform for I. < . l; 

Extendic f the cul\ er lei t anal si reel 

' onstruction ol foreman's office and store buildings on I. ( . i: Ste, Flavii 

Construction of railway under subsidj Lardo, towards I oner .in™ 

B. C 
' on 'i in I i.'i ■.! tor I. C R. on Pier No. 8 ... Halifax, V S 



In bine Canal, Que 

Halifax. X. s 

Riviere du Loup & Ste. Flavie, 
Que 

Bracebridge. Ont 

Minudic. X. S 

Bout dc L'Isle. Que 

Bruce Mines. Ont 

Cornwall (.'anal, Ont 

Maecan. X. S 

Belledune Church Road, \. S 

St. Cyrille, Que 

Mulgrave, N. S.. 

Charlotte. St. George and St 

Edward, v.u. 
St. Law rence ( anals.l Cornwall. 

Ont 



13 
25 
13 
3 

3 

3 

IT 

22 

22 

23 
12 
23 
12 

1 
12 
29 
29 
29 

I 
13 



U 
10 



I lornwall ( anal. I llit 

( handily (anal. Quo 

St, Andre, Que 
Welland, out 



■ in I ion ol i reighl shed on I. I '. R 
Eight 25,000 gallon water tanks on P I . i 
["ran fi i hed oi I. ' i: 



railv as 



Addition to station and building of freight sheds for l I R 

-he, I on I 



DoBert, N. S 

P. E, I. Railway, P. E. I 

VIonel on, N. B, 

iii'.i n S - 
St Johns, Qui 

i int 



i and freight shed on i 'hamblj i anal 
Una soul h entrance pier of eon. it 
Work of dredging and widening entrance of canal 

i Woodburn, \. s 
. Lome 

\ 1 i 

i motion of timber and concreti substructure for new rail 

w eiiand canal, bet « een loi i. II md loi 
u elland i an it i, ranch it. T. I: w elland Canal, Ont 

i on truction of freight shed and platform fori. ,C. R, Laurier, Que 



Erei tat ion buildings for [. C. B 



i ictober 10 



13 
13 



13 
li 
6 

it 

it 



13 

13 

1 1 

12 
11 
13 

IS 

28 
is 
29 
31 
9 
31 
24 
26 



Nov. 



\o\ . 



1 1, tober '.'l 
Nov, 



REPORT OF TEE DEPIIY MINISTER OF LABOUR 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



47 



I.I<T OF CONTRACTS FOR WHICH FUR WAGES SCHEDULES WERE REQUESTED BY THE 
DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS.— Con. 



Nature of Work. 



Locality. 



Date of 
Supplying 
Schedule. 



S.. 



Erection of station building for I. C. R Villeray Junction. Que. 

Sydney, C.B., N.S... . 
Freight shed and platform on I. C. R North Sydney, C. B., N 

Station " " Piusville. P. E. I 

Dwellings on P. E. I. railway Bloomneld &Miseouche,P.E.I. 

Enlarging, widening and extending freight houses on P. K. I. 

railway wharf Snmmerside. P. E. I 

Two SU.OOO-gallon water tanks on I. C, R Ste. Flavie & Chaudiere Junc- 
tion, Que 

Reconstruction S. wall of supply weir. Beauharnois canal. Valleyfleld. Que 

Construction of brick and stone station for I. C. R Antigoni-h, X. S 

Construction of combined station and freight shed for T. C. R. Grandon. X. S. 

-ruction of a station building on I. C. R Pictou. X. S 

Construction of engine house I. C. R Truro, X. s 

Heating I. C. R. car -hop- Moncton. X. B 

- ruction of addition to station on I. ('. R Charlo. X. B 

Buildings for passengers and freight I. C. R South Uniacke, N. S. 

Repairing and re-building portions of Government dry dock 

west end of Basin No. 2 Lachine (anal. Que 

i Construction of passenger station and freight shed. Kensington. P. K. I 

Work c if stopping leaks in Galops Canal, Ont 

( onstruetion of dwelling, baggage-room building, remodelling 

I. C. R. station, &c ... (Riviere Ouelle, Que 

Construction of single track diversion. I. C. R .St. Leonard Junction, Que 

Construction of single track diversion. I. C. R Mitchell, '^it: 

< Construction of erib-work on Courtney Bay branch of I. C. R St. John. X.B 



U 
14 
16 

28 

21 

■21 
21 



21 
21 
21 



ll. C 



Erection of bridges on I. C. I 



Bedford. N.S 

Mitchell, Que. ... 

St. Leonard Junction. Que. 

Morell River. P. E. I 

Sutherland. N.S 

Sackville, X. S 
La Planche, X.B 
Salmon River, X". S 



Construction of crib-work protection I. C. R. bridge Grand Narrows, X.S 

Xew station and improving I. C. R. freight house at Memramcook. X.B ., 

Enlargement of I. C. R. station and providing freight shed . Ste. Helene, Que.. 

Construction of loading platform. I. C. R St. Pacome, Que. 

Double tracking I. C. R. between Stellarton and X\ Glasgow. X.S. 

Re-modelling of I. C. I!, station building and completion of 

freight -tied Montmagny, Que 

Line construction.. Welland Canal, Ont. 

bridge to be erected over Welland Canal. 

Niagara Btreet St. Catharines, Ont 

Re-modelling and enlarging I. C. R. station building. < anaan, N.S 

motion branch line of P. E. I. R . Vernon River Bridge, l'.E.l... 



1 

1 

1 

5 

28 

28 

31 

:n 

2!) 
29 
29 
29 
29 
21i 
28 
31 
28 



1905 



:t 



Erection of com. station and dwelling. I c. I; 
ruction of sub-structure of a swing bridge. 

ed, L C. R 

< 'onstruction of bi P. E. I. R 



Alton. X.S 

Lachine Canal. Atwatcr Ave.. 

I. Que. 

Oxford. X.S 

Cardigan to Montague Bridge, 
P.E.I 



January 4 
Dec. :il 
January ■'; 

:t 
16 



Fourteen roof trusses with supporting columns and monitor 

1 members for I. C. R c Moncton, X. R 

Erection of coal shed for I. c. R Ste. Louise, Que 

Double tracking I. C. R between Rockingham and Bedford 

Bridge. N.S 
Construction of brick and stone station, 1. < . R. Drummondville, Qui 

Construction of addition to I. C.R. I Bathurst, N.B 



< onstruction "i raita aj 
Wiring nmbi I. < . R 
Construction of stores and office building, I. 1 i: 
Construction of line of railway 

action of hydraulic lock 

Connection between main line of P. F. I. railway and Hills- 

boro bridge 
Construction of line of railway 

Construction of foundation of elevator on Wei la ml Canal 

iring foundations of locks 12, 15 and 16 
m nf bridge for 1. ' 1.'. oi er E. Ri 

if Allanburg and Marian- bridge-. . , 
house 
■ ncr i. in of I. < . R. engil 
ding slope walls 

< onstruction of line of railway from Eastman, Que., to town 

line between township of Bolton and the east pan of tie 

town-hip of Potion, 12 miles 
Repair- to certain crib-work on I. ( '. R . 

ion building 

Addition to I. C.R. station am jmge room. 



Mine- Junction. (»nt 



Stellarton. X.s 

Dawson to Stewart River, Yuk 

KirkHeld. Trent (anal. Out 



Cbarlottetown, P.K.L 

■ - 
Welland i anal, ' tat... 
du Loup, Que 
Amh 

Lachine Canal. Que. 



February 7 


March 


27 




1 




27 
27 



' ■ ■■ 
Nash's Creek, N.B 

ville. X. B. , 



March 



Toilet accommods I reightshed Campbellton, N.B 



in 
22 



48 



DEI'ARTllEXT OF LABVLR 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

LIST OF CONTRACTS FOR WHICH FAIR WAGES SCHEDULES WERE REQUESTED BY THE 
DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND CANALs.-Cok. 



Nature of Work. 



Locality. 



Kate of 
Supplying 
Schedule. 



Concrete retaining wall and under-pinning the old wall at 

Ba-in No. 2.... 
Enlarging and hnpro\ lng I. C. R. station 

"ii 
Addition to I. C. R. station . 
Erection of station, I. C R 
1 onstruction of railway between 

Construction of railway between 



Construction of pile wharf and addition to P. E. I. railway 

freight shed at 

Construction of an addition to and re-modelling of I. i . I; 

stations. 
Construction of addition to I. C. K. freight -bed and exten- 
sion to platform 
< 'onstrnction of addition to I. C. R. freight shed 
Excavation between elevator and < ornwallis - 
Construction of line of railway fr a poini al or near 

ruction of railway between . 



Re-modelling, erection and completion of addition to I. C. R. 
ion. 

Double track todiversion of I. C. R 

Addition to 1. I . K. freight shed. &c. 

addition to baggage room and conversion of old freight rooms 
into kitchens, I. ( !.|E 

Addition to freight shed, platform, loading platform and mov- 
ing of cattle pen 

Electrical wiring. I. ( '. R. freight shed 

Construction of new railway station for 1. i . I;., and conver- 
sion of present one to dwelling 

Erection of lock and bridge houses on. 

i onstruction of eight section. tool-houses at different point- . 

I. ( '. I;, bridge. 

Docking along the old West Pier at entrance to Welland Canal. 

Stone protection to the banks of the Wetland Canal between 

Construction of station, I. C. R 

Supply and erection of " T " beams and hand railing for tic 

fiSiSlanding wharfs, above and below 



Lachine (. anal. One 

Ste. Aune, Qui 

St. Tele-. i. l'.K.I 

St. Alexis, Que. 

Windsor, N.S. 

LaurenceviUe and Eastman to 

I. nk./ Bon, .11. i. Que 

Kingsbury anil Windsor .Mills 
Que. 

.town. P.K.I 

St. Charli -. Que 



April 



Sussex. N.B. 
Moncton, N. B 

M,S 
- Bridge, on < . I 

Nicola Lake, B.C 

Edmundston and a i oint on the 
St. John River between 
i trand Kail- and Edmunds- 
ton, N.B. 



L'l-let. Quel May 

Birch ( love, N.S June 

Shubenaea lie. N.S. 



River John. N 



Truro. N.S 
Halifax. .X.- 



June 



si. Moi-e. Cue July 

Lachine Canal. Que 

Murray Harbour B'ch.P.E.LR. . 

Mitchell, Qui 

Port < 'olborne, ' in! 

Thorold and Pi. » olborne. i »m. 
McKaj 's Siding, N.S 

St. I 'ins Lock, Que 






26 



:: 
13 



13 

i3 



in 
in 



The following statement prepared by the Department of Railways and Canals 
shows the number of contracts awarded by that department during: the year 1904-05 
which contained fair wages schedules supplied by the Department of Labour^ together 
with the localities, the work, the dates at which the several contracts were entered into, 
and the amounts of these contracts. 

Department ok Labour, Can-aim. 
Statistical Tables v. a. r.. No. 7 

contra! is entered into i(y the department of railways and canals during 

THE Klsi \l \ 1 1AR ENDED Jl \K »'. i:«". CONTAINING FAIR WAGES SCHEDULES 
A\H OTHER CONDITIONS FOE PROTECTION OF LABOl I; 



I'. Hi 



Localil s 



Nature of Work. 



Amount 



I9W 


Aug. 


in 


July 


ii 




- 


■• 


■ 


" 


■-".i 




■.".i 


•• 


2D 


■■ 


Z 


" 


29 



Dlonial Railway. Dwelling at Eel River. N B. . . 

Addilionto-talion.it BrOOkfiold. . . 
Store and office building al St. John, N B 
\l..\ .■ freight -bed at I. .A i-. <,'lle 
Coal bou -I- with boi-t iii gin. i. iiinev\ at Sydney, N.S. 
Provide and erect pipe-, lining raJvef*. SEc in 
connection with engine house n SI John, N.B. 
Addition to Freight -bid al St, Molso, Qui- 
I reighl -bed and platform ai Chatham Jet., N.B 
station and dwelling at St. Leonard Junction, 

• Supplied bj the Department of Railway- and (anal-. 





300 00 


ft. Till (111 


1. on en 


Schedule rates. 


4,932 no 


:,:.•, mi 




1,000 00 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 



49 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 
CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BY THE DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND ( AN ALS.-Con. 



Date. 



1905 



Locality. 



Oct. 


12.. 
20.. 
20. 
19 


Intercolonial 


Nov. 


to 

in 
19.. 

19.. 

25.. 

26 

26 

19 


• 


Dec. 


20.. 

20.. 

20.. 

20 

20 

20.. 

20.. 

20 


• 


1905 




Jan. 


19 


' 


1901 




Dec. 


15 


* 




20 




5. . 




Nov. 


10.. 
10.. 


• 


Oct, 


20.. 


' 


1903 




Jan. 


».. 

it; 
20 
27.. 
20 


' 


Feb 


8.. 
14 


• 



11 






Marcl 


3. 




I. 
3 


Feb. 


22 




22 




22. 


Marcl 


3 


April 


1. 


March •-') 


•• 


24 


April 


15. 




15. 


• ■ 


5 


May 


1 




1 


" 


i:i 


•■ 


15 


April 


28 


Feb. 


1 


May 


13 


" 


18 


" 


13 


April 


l.i 


Jane 


12 


May 


17 


" 


1:1 


" 


13 


April 


3. 



Nature of Work. 



Railway Protection Pier at Pfc. Tupper, N.S 

1 . . Station and linggage room at Stellarton. N.S 

1 Engine house at Pirate Harbonr, N.S 

Office ami stores building at Pirate Harbour, N.S 

Station at Maccan, N.S 

Station, &c, at Bayfield Road, N.S 

Extension to freight shed and platform, &c, at 

St. Andre, Que 

Quay wall of cnbwork at Halifax. N.S 

station and freight shed at Belledune church road. 

Freight shed and platform at DeBert 

SI Cyrille 
Charlotte. St. George 

and St. Edward 

station at Antigonish, N.S 

Changes and additions to electric installation at 

I. C. R. station at Halifax. N.S 

station and freight shed at ' Irandon, N.S .. 

Addition to station, &c., at Hilden. N.S ........ 

Station at Villeroy Jet., Que 

Freight shed and platform at N orth Sydney, N.S 

Freight shed and platform at Laurier, Que 

Station at Sydney, N.S 



Engine house, etc., at Truro, N.S. 



Transfer shed at Moncton, N.B 

Eighty thousand gallon water tank at St. Flavie 

and at Chaudiere Jet.. Que 

HiiiMinu tut' passengers and freight at Uniacke, 

N.s 

Fan system heating for two-car shop extensions at 

.Moncton. N.B 

Fan system heating for engine house at Ste. Flavie 

and River du Loup, Que. 

Pipes, fittings, etc., in connection with engine 

house- it Ste. Flavie, Chaudiere Jet. and River 

<lu Loup, Que 

Station at Pictou. N.S. . 

t Ireosoted pile wharf at Halifax. N.S 

Office and stores building at Sic. Kla\ ie, Que.. . . 

Remodel station at St. Paeome, Que 

Repair cribwork on Courtney Bay branch 

Freight shed. etc.. at M nigra ve, N.S 

Double-tracking between Stellarton and Xew 

Glasgow 

Remodel station at Montmagny, Que 

Cribwork protection to bridge at Grand Narrows. 

N. S 

Station at Alton. N.S 

Widen roadbed bet wet.ii Rockingham and Bedford 

bridge 

Station and freight shed at Ste. Helene. Que 

Buildings at Riviere Ouclle. Que 

Station at Drummondville. Que 

Addition to station at Charlo, N.B 

Freight shed ami platform and remodel station tit 

Canaan, N.B 

Addition to freight shed at Bathurst, N.B 

Stores and office building at stellarton. N.s 
Station and improve freight shed at Memramcook, 

N.B. 

Repair cribwork west ofstationat Levis 

Engine bouse tit Amherst, N.S 

Induced draft plant in boiler room of new baggage 

room at Levis, Otic 

Coal shed and re del station at Ste. Louise, Que. 

Track diversion al MItcheU,Que 

st. Leonard, Que 

Addition to station, ste. Anne. Que 

lee house at River du Loup, Que 

Addition to station, St. Alexis, Que 

Roof trasses for ear shop, Moncton 

Addition to station, St. Charles Jet.. 

Addition to freight shed, Sec, Moncton, N.B 

Sussex. N.B 

Station and dwelling tit Salmon Lake. Que 

Station at Windsor, N.s.. 

Excavation f" extending yard at Halifax, N S 

Freight shed at Oxford, N.S.. 

Freight shed on pier No. 8, Halifax 

Addition to station at Nash's Creek, N.B 



Amount. 



S cts. 
3H.1'.'! 00 

l.i.i »; oo 

Schedule pal es. 

1,700 Hit 

6,79c 

1,10 till 

850 00 
107,700 nit 
895 'it 
550 00 
85'J 00 

50J 00 each. 
10,975 00 

1,80 00 
1,130 on 

S1KI till 

2,000 oo 

5,900 hi 

lion 00 

56,923 00 

Schedule rates. 

6,060 no 

81,470.00 per tank 



!i.X!« 

5,915 no 



20,525 00 
3-',900 tKt 
Schedub ' ' ' 

2;200 no 

770 oo 

Schedule rale-. 

550 00 

14,7011 00 
2,387 '■ 

29,500 00 
l,89J 

70.1 

1,850 00 
2,875 in 
9,912 on 
1,29! 

1,200 no 

503 00 

3,975 OO 

1,978 '»i 

Schedule rates. 

1,395 00 

595 00 

45o on 
Schedule rates. 

Q 
775 on 

I.. 

inr.V.I pet II.. 

500 no 

1,211 oo 

1,251 oo 

2,760 DO 

11.126 oo 

Schedule rates. 

Mil 93 

20,922 "I 

630 no 



66— 4 



50 



DEPARTUEXT OF LABOUR 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BY THE DEPARTMENT OK RAILWAYS AND CANALS.— Con. 




April 


15 




IS 


1904 


Julj 


11 


Sept. 


22 


Dec. 


■_"i 


1905 


Jan. 


9 


*• 


!l 


■■ 


9 


Jan. 


20 


Feb. 


6 


•■ 


14 


March U 



Maj 



1904 

Hi-.. -it\ 



Nov. 28. 

7. 



10. 



II,. . 

July 
Dec. 



28 

26 
15 

11 
20 



July 25 



Nov. 
Deo. 



1905 

March 3 

April 1 
May 1 . 



1901 

Oct 20 
Nov. 25 

905 

May 3 
Feb. 15 

19W 

Sept. 29 

1905 

Jan. 

Feb. 20 
March !>• 

May 13 



Intercolonial Railway.. 



Prince Edward Island Ry. 



Prince Edward Island Ry. 



Freight shed and toilet accommodation at Camp- 
bcllton, X.B 

Baggage room and addition to station at Rogers- 
ville. N'.B 

Straighten main line at Curtis (.'reck 

Station at Alberton 

Eight water tanks 



Station at Pinsville. and addition to York station 

Station at Kensington 

Stations at Bloomfield and Miseonehe 



Extend freight houses on railway wharf and rail 
way yard at Summerside 

Railway from Murray Harbonr line to Vernon 
River bridge 

Branch line, Cardigan to Montague bridge 

Connection between main line and Hillsborough 
River bridge 

station at St. Teresa 

Stations, water tanks, etc . . 



Beauharnois Canal Re struct south wall of supply weir at 

Valleyfield, Que 

Chambly Canal Wharf and freight shed at St. John 

Cornwall Canal Widen and deepen channel between east end of 

revetment wall and old lock No. 17 

Widen and enlarge regulating weir at old lock 

X... 17. 

Installation of concreting outfit 

Improve channel west of upper entrance 

Office building at Cornwall. Ont 

Farran's Point Canal Acetylene gas lighting system 

Galops Canal Stopping of leakage through south bank, near end 

of Iroquois seel ion 

Grcnville Canal Rebuild wharf at upper entrance 

Lachine Canal Raising part of New St. Gabriel shed No. 1 

Concrete retaining wall, etc., north side basin No. 1. 

Repair parts o f Government dry dork, west end of 

basin No. '2 



Lachine Canal Sub-txucture of Atwater Avenue bridge 

Rebuild slope walls of canal 

Concrete retaining wall and underpinning old wall, 

basin No. -J 



Elideau Canal Concrete dam at Poonamalie lock Nation 

Sault Ste. M.uie i anal. Extension to south mooring pier of upper entrance 



Sault Ste. Marie i anal Deenenand widen channel-was of upper entr ,nce. 
Trent Canal, Hydraulic lock, near Lakefleld 



Welland < anal 



Substructures of AUanburgand Marlatte bridges 

Substructure Of bridge No. n 



Welland (anal Substructure of Niagara st. bridge, St. Cathi 

Blecl i ie.il t ransmission -\ stem 
Remove centre pier work of AJlanburg and Mar- 

latts bridges 
Repair foundations locks No. 12, 15and 16 
Foundation for grain elevator at Port Colborne, Oni 



ets. 
450 00 

1,081 00 

Schedule rates. 
■J, hi;, 00 
16,681 00 

Schedule rati s. 

1,366 55 

Schedule rates. 



$1.850 00 

Schedule rates. 
Schedule rates. 

Schedule rates. 

5533 on 

Schedule rates. 



Schedule rates. 
§4,700 00 

Schedule rates. 

Schedule rates. 
Schedule rates. 
Schedule rates. 

16,094 00 
$6,552 83 

Schedule rates. 

Schedule rates 

1666 on 
Schedule rates. 

Schedule rates. 



Schedule rates. 
Schedule rales. 



Schedule rates. 



Schedule rates. 
Schedule rates. 



-i 



i\ per eu. vd. 

' 



Schedule rates. 
Schedule rates. 



Schedule rates. 
Schedule rates 

$3.00 per en. yd. 
Schedule rates. 
Schedule rates. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



51 



Department of Labour. Canada. 
Statistical Tables. V. a. K. No. 8. 

SUBSIDY AGREEMENTS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF RAILWAYS ENTERED INTO BY THE 
DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED 
.TINE 30. 1905. CONTAINING FAIR WAGES SCHEDULES AND OTHER CONDITIONS 
FOR PROTECTION OF LABOUR' 



Date. 



1905 
Feb. 25 

1901 
Oct 7 

1909 

Jan. 28 
1904 

Oct. 5. 

Nov. 12 
12 

1905 

May 13 



1901 

Sept. 8 
Oct. 20 

1905 
Feb. 1 

1901 
Oct. 28 

190. 

April 27 
March 9 

Juue 12. 

23 

1901 
Oct. 12 



Amount of Subsidy. 



Line of Railway to be Constructed. 



Per Mile. 



From Paspebiac to Gaspe. Que. 



From Rraeebridge. in Muskoka, to point near Baysville, Ont. . 
From Gordon Lake Station to Rock lake 



From Bruce Mines Junction to town of Bruce Mines. 



From St. Peters to Louisburg 

Balance of subsidy for bridge from Bout de LTle to Charlemagne 
Add lional grant for Bout de LTle bridge 



From western end of 10 miles towards a point on St John river 
between Grand Falls and Edmundst on. and addition to and extension 
of the above 



From Toronto to Sudbury 

From Lardo towards Upper Arrow Lake. B.C 



From Da'H son to Stewart river. 



From point on Joggins Railway to village of Minudie.. 



From Spence's bridge, on C.P.R, to Nicola lake 

From Eastman to town linebetween townshipof Bolton, east part, and 

township of Potton 

From Kingsbury to Windsor Mills 

From point on main line between Lawrenceville and Eastman to Lake 

Bonella 



From La Tuque, on St. Maurice river, to point near River Jean none. 



Not exceed- 
ing. 



- . 



3,20 I 
3,200 



3.200 



3.200 



3,200 



3.200 



3,2 
3.200 

3.200 

3.200 
3,200 

3,200 
3,200 



$6,400 



5,400 
6,400 



O.lm 



6,400 
51,000 
50,000 



.; 100 



6,400 
6,400 



6,400 



6,400 



6,400 

6,400 
6,401 

6,400 



6,400 



Supplied by Department of Railways and Canals. 



DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES. 

The following conditions, framed in pursuance of the Fair Wagea Kesolution, 
were incorporated in and formed part of each of the several contracts hereinafter men- 
tioned as having been awarded by the Department of Public- Works for the year ended 
June 30, 1905 :— 

' The wages to be paid in the execution of this contract shall be those generally ac- 
cepted as current in each trade for competent workmen in the district where the work 
is carried on. If this condition is violated the said party of the second part may can- 

S6— 4J 



52 



DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

eel the contract and refuse to accept any work done thereunder. No workman em- 
ployed upon said work shall at any time be paid less than the minimum rate of wages 
set forth in the fair wages schedule attached, provided the schedule fairly represents 
the current rate of wages in the locality where the work is being carried on.' 

During the fiscal year 1904-05 the department received 21 requests for fair wages 
schedules from the Department of Marine and Fisheries, and schedules for all were 
supplied by the department. The following is a list taken from the records of the de- 
partment, giving the nature of the work being contracted for, the locality of thei work, 
and the date at which the schedule requested was supplied by the Department of 
Labour : — 



Department ok Labour. Canada. 
Statistical Tablfs. V. A. R.— No. y. 

LIST OF CONTRACTS FOR WHICH FAIR WAGES SCHEDULES WERK REQUESTED BY THE 
DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES AND PREPARED BY THE DEPARTMENT 
OF LABOUR DURING THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1905. 




Construction of wooden lighthouse 

public work 

lighthouse tower 

Erection of fish drier 

Construction of two lighthouse towers 

Lighthouse and keeper's dwelling 

Construction of lighthouse 

tower 

Construction of wooden lighthouse tower and 

beeper's dwelling 

Construction of lighthouse tower 

wooden lighthouse tow r 



Douglas Island. Dalhousic, N.B 
Niagara-on-the-Lake. Ont ..... 
Pilot-Bay, Kootenay Lake. B.C. 
Souris, 1'. E.I 



Two range-light tow era 
Wooden ligh 



Sydney. N.S 

I'apeTryon, P.E.I. 

Bear River Entrance, Annapolis Basin, N S.. 

McMillan Point, Gut of Canso N.S 



Thrumcap Island, N.S 

Muuroe Point. St. Ann- Harbour, N.S. 

Troop's Point, N.S 

Wilson Channel, \lgoma, Ont 

Shulie Harbour, N.S 

Shippegan Island, N.S 



July 

August 



Sept 

October 



steel and concrete beacon 

Wooden lighthouse tower 

Lighthouse and keeper's dwelling. 

Two dwellings for light-keepers 

Wooden lighthouse. 

Lighthouse tower Bridget Island, St Mary's river, N.S. 

Construe ion of lighthouse and dwelling.. < m Keef. Lake Winnipeg, Man 



Hcauieu Bank, Que 

Denison Island Muskoka, ont . 

i .n \ shoro Harbour, N.S 

Brier Island, N.S 

Fisherman's Harbour, Guysboro Co., N.S., 



Nov. 



Dec. 



1905. 



Fcbr. 
April 

Juno 



15 

u 

3d 

■_-: 

31 



10 
in 
25 
26 
13 
13 
28 



REPORT OF TEE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 



53 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

The following statement, prepared by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
shows the number of contracts awarded by that department during the year 1904-05, 
which contained fair wages schedules supplied by the Department of Labour, together 
with the localities, the work, the dates at which the several contracts were entered into, 
and the amounts of these contracts: — 

Department ok Labour, Canada. 
Statistical Tables, v. a. R. No. to. 

CONTRACTS AWARDED BV THE DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES DURING THE 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JINK 3 '. lfliki. CONTAINING EAIR WAGES CLAUSES ABOVE 
CITED, AND EAIR WAGES SCHEDULES PREPARED BY 1HK DEPARTMENT i IF 
LABOUR 



Date. 


Locality. 


Nature of Contract. 


Amount. 


1904. 

July 6 . 
6.. 


Douglas Island, N.B 

Montreal. P.O 


i ^instruction of lighthouse tower 

Swift Current buoys I3> 


$1,642 00 
945 1 


Aug. 23. . Sydney, N.S 




2.124 00 


23 Cape Tryon, P.E.I. . . . 


lighthouse tower and keeper's 


1,590 00 


July 22 Kootenay Lake, B.C 

Sept. 17.. Bear River, N.S 




800 00 
494 00 


20. McMillan Point. N.S 


.. .. 


545 0) 


Oct. 3 Marie Joseph, N.S 

is Munroe Point, N.S 

11 Troon's Point. N.S . 




1,800 00 




71" 00 




1,275 00 


.. 


i.yi oo 


12 
1905. 
Jan. 11 


Wilson Channel. Ont 

Sorel. P.Q 


two wooden lighthouse towers 


1.34S 00 

4,200 00 
25,000 '"I 


Feb. 7 


Beau ieu Bank. P.O 


March 27.. Shippegan Island, N.B 

April 12 Gravenhurst. Ont 




1,500 00 




650 00 




3,150 00 


June 28. . 


Halifax. N.S 




1,200 00 




Total 






$19,423 00 









Prepared by the Department of Marine and Fisheries. 



POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 



During the fiscal year 1904-05, the only contract awarded by the Post Office De- 
partment was a contract given for a period of four years, dating from February 25, 
1905, for 16-ounce letter scales and weights. This contract was awarded under the 
conditions for the protection of labour set forth in the regulations regarding the sweat- 
ing system, which have been inserted in contracts given by the Post Office Department 
during recent years. 

The following is a copy of these regulations: — 



Regulations Regarding the 'Sweating ' System. 

With a view to suppressing the ' sweating ' system and securing payment to the 
working men and working women of fair wages, and the performance of the work under 

proper sanitary conditions, the contract for 

shall be subject to the following regulations, and strict com- 
pliance with the true spirit and intent of the various provisions herein contained will 
be required:— 



54 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

* Clause 1. — Except with the written permission of the Postmaster General, 

all included in the said 

contract shall be done in the contractor's own factory, and no portion of the work 

of shall be done at the houses of 

the workpeople. The contract shall not, nor shall any portion thereof, be transferred 
without the written permission of the Postmaster General, and sub-letting of the con- 
tract or of any of the work to be performed under the contract, is hereby prohibited. 
Any infringement of the provisions of this clause, or any of them, if proved to the satis- 
faction of the<}overnor in Council, shall render the contractor liable to a fine not ex- 
ceeding five hundred dollars for each offence, which may be deducted from any moneys 

payable to under the contract, and if the amount earned by the contractor under 

the contract and still in the hands of the government be insufficient to meet the amount 
of such fines, then the government may apply the sum in its hands towards payment 
of the amount of such fines, and may recover the deficiency from the contractor in any 
action, suit or proceeding by way of information in any court of competent jurisdic- 
tion as a debt due by the contractor to the Crown as a liquidated amount, and any 
Order in Council fixing the amount of such deficiency shall be conclusive proof of the 
amount of such deficiency in any such action, suit or proceeding. 

t lause 2. — If the contractor violates the condition herein mentioned against sub- 
letting, shall not' be entitled to receive any payment under the 

contract for work done by the sub-contractor, and the Postmaster-General may refuse 
to accept any work performed by a sub-contractor in violation of the prohibition herein 
contained against sub-letting. 

Clause 3. — The, wages to be paid in the execution of this contract shall be those 
which in the opinion of the Postmaster General are generally accepted as current in 
each trade for competent working men and working women in the district where the 
work is i carried out. If there be no such current rate of wages then the contractor shall 
pay wages at such rate as the Postmaster General shall in writing declare to be just 
and reasonable, and if either of these conditions is violated, the Postmaster General 
may cancel said contract and refuse to accept any work thereunder. 

Clause 4. — All working men and working women employed upon the work com- 
prehended in and to be executed pursuant to the said contract shall be residents of 
Canada. 

Clause 5. — The contractor shall not be entitled to payment of any money which 
would otherwise be payable under the terms of the contract in respect of work and 

labour performed in the execution thereof, unless and until 

shall have filed in the office of the Postmaster General in support of claim 

for payment a statement showing the classes of labour, rates of wages, hours per day, 
amounts paid, and, amounts (if any) due and unpaid for wages for work and labour 
done by any foremen, working men or working women employed upon the said work, 
and such statement shall be attested by the statutory declaration of the said,contractor 
or of such other person or persons as the Minister may indicate or require, and the 
contractorjshall from time to time furnish to the Postmaster General such further de- 
tailed information and evidence as the Postmaster General may deem necessary, in 
order to satisfy him that the conditions herein contained to secure the payment of fair 
wages have been complied ,with, and that the working men or working women so em- 
ployed as aforesaid upon the portion of the work in respect of which payment is de- 
manded have been paid in full. . 



• In these cases the written permission of the Postmaster General will be granted only 
where It is the custom of the trade In the locality where the contract is being executed to have 
the work performed on premises other than the contractor's own factory, or where the custom- 
ary method of working Is by the piece. The facts to be ascertained if necessary by Investi- 
gation by the officers of the Department of Labour. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 55 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Clause 6. — In the event of default being made in payment of any money owing in 
respect of wages of any foremen, working men or working women employed on the said 
work, and if a claim therefor is filed in the office of the Postmaster General and proof 
thereof satisfactory to the Postmaster-General is furnished, the said Postmaster Gen- 
eral may pay such claim out of any moneys at any time payable by His Majesty under 
said contract, and the amount so paid shall be deemed payments to the contractor. 

■Clause 7. — Except with the written permission of the Postmaster General, no 
portion of the work shall be done by piece-work. 

Clause 9. — Tbe working men and the working women employed in the performance 
by the custom of the trade in the district where the work is performed for each of the 
different classes of labour employed upon the work. 

Clause 9. — The workingmen and tbe working women employed in tbe performance 
of the said contract shall not be required , to work for longer hours than those fixed by 
the custom of the trade in the district where the work is carried on, except for the pro- 
tection of life or property, or in case of other emergencies. 

Post Office Department, Canada, 
Ottawa. 

Not only in work performed under contract for the Post Office Department, but 
in the matter of all supplies furnished to the department the persons furnishing such 
supplies have 1 een obliged to submit to the Post Office Department, for approval by 
the Department f Labour, a statement of the rates of wages paid to their employees, 
and the hours of labour required to be worked by them. On furnishing supplies they 
have been obliged to submit with their accounts a declaration affirming that they 
have strictly complied with the conditions as proposed. 

During the fiscal year 1904-05 articles have been supplied to the Post Office De- 
partment under contracts executed in previous years. These contracts contained the 
same regulations for the suppression of sweating as the contracts entered into during 
the fiscal year 1903-04- 

The following is a list of supplies furnished the Post Office Department during 
the fiscal year 1904-05, under contract or otherwise, all of which have been furnished 
under conditions for the protection of labour employed, approved of by the Depart- 
ment of Labour: — 

Amount 
Nature of Order. of 

< Irder. 



Making and repairing metal dating and other stamps and type and brass crown seals.. 



Making and repairing robber lating and other hand stamps and 
Supplying 81 impin 



_ing material, inclusive of making and repairing pads, also wooden boxes and 
post marking and cancelling ink.. 

Makii uringposl officesc les, 

Suppl] ing mail bags. 

Repairing mail bags 

Repairing mail locks and supplying mail bag fitting-.. . 

Supplying portable letter boxes and repairing parcel recei irtable tin boxes and rail- 

way m 

Miscellaneous orders for making and repairing postal stores 

Making up and snpplying articles of official uniform.. 



7,168 89 

1,843 22 

11.458 80 

14,894 90 

1,124 53 

6,493 55 

i ■ 

IS.099 00 



56 DEPARTilEyT OF LABOVR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE. 

No contracts for manufactured goods requiring the insertion of Fair Wages 
clauses were made by the department of the North-west Mounted Police during the 
fiscal year 1904-05. The supplies for that department were purchased during the year 
under old contracts which had been running for three years. These contracts con- 
tained the following clause for the protection of labour: — 

Eight. — With a view to suppressing the sweating system and securing payment 
to the workmen of fair wages, and the performance of the work under proper sanitary 
conditions, this contract shall be subject to the following regulations, and strict com- 
pliance with the true spirit and intent of the various provisions herein contained is 
required : — 

Sec. 1. — All articles included in this contract shall be made up in the con- 
tractor's own factory, and no portion of the work of making up 'such articles shall 
be done at the houses of the workpeople. The contract shall not, nor shall any part 

thereof, be transferred without the permission of the 

and sub-letting 

of the contract, other than that which may be customary in the trades concerned, is 
hereby prohibited. Any infringement of the provisions of this clause, or any of 
them, if proved to the satisfaction of the Governor in Council, shall render the con- 
tractor liable to a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars for each offence, which may 
be deducted from any moneys payable to him under this contract, and if the amount 
earned by the contractor under this contract and still in the hands of the govern- 
ment be insufficient to meet the amount of such fines, then the government may apply 
the sum in their hands towards payment of the amount of such fines, and may recover 
the deficiency from the contractor in any action, suit or proceeding by way of 
information in any court of competent jurisdiction as a debt due by the contractor 
to the Crown as a liquidated amount, and any Order in Council fixing the amount of 
such deficiency in any such action, suit or proceeding, shall be conclusive proof of the 
amount of such deficiency in any such action, suit or proceeding. 

Sec. 2. — If the contractor violates the condition herein mentioned against sub- 
letting, he shall not be entitled to receive any payment under the contract for work 

done by the sub-contractor, and the may refuse to 

accept any work performed by a sub-contractor in violation of the prohibition herein 
contained against sub-letting. 

Sec. 3. — The wages to be paid in the execution of this contract shall be those 
generally accepted as current in such trade for competent workmen in the district 

where the work is carried on. If this condition is violated the 

may cancel the contract and refuse to accept any work done thereunder, and the con- 
tractor will thereafter not be allowed to undertake any work for the North-west 
Ifounted Police. 

Sec. 4. — The factory, and the work there being performed under this contract, 
shall at all reasonable times be open to inspection by persons therefor authorized in 
writing by the 

Sec. 5. — Before being entitled to payment of any moneys which the contractor 
may from time to time claim to be due him. under this contract, he shall file with 

the in support of such claim, a solemn statutory 

declaration of himself and of such others as the indicate, 

testifying to the rates of wage? paid in cxeeut'on of this contract, and to the manner 
in all other respects in which the provisions of this contract have been observed and 

the work performed, and generally setting forth such information as the 

in::;. ill enable him to determine whether and, if so, in what respects 

any of the provisions of this contract may have been violated. In the case of the 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 57 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

contractor's absence from the country, his extreme illness, or death, but under no 
other circumstance, may such statutory declaration by the contractor personally be 
dispensed with; but nevertheless, such other statutory declaration as aforesaid as the 
may call for, shall be so filed. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITIA AND DEFENCE. 

The following conditions, framed in pursuance of the Fair Wages resolution, were 
incorporated in and formed part of each of the several contracts hereinafter men- 
tioned as having been awarded by the Department of Milit'a and Defence during the 
year ended June 30, 1904. 

Eighth. — With a view of suppressing the sweating system and securing payment 
to the workmen of fair wages and the performance of the work under proper sanitary 
conditions, this contract shall be subject to the following regulations, and strict com- 
pliance with the true spirit and intent of the various provisions herein contained 
is required. 

Sec. 1. — All articles included in this contract shall be made up in the con- 
tractor's own factory, and no portion of the work of making up such articles shall 
be done at the houses of the workpeople. The contract shall not, nor shall any por- 
tion thereof, be transferred without the written permission of the Minister of Militia 
and Defence, and sub-letting of the contract or any of the work to be performed under 
the contract, other than that which may be customary in the trades concerned, is 
hereby prohibited. Any infringement of the provisions of this clause, or any of 
them, if proved to the satisfaction of the Governor in Council, shall render the con- 
tractor liable to a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars for each offence, which may 
be deducted from any moneys payable to him under this contract, and if the amount 
earned by the contractor under this contract and still in the hands of the govern- 
ment be insufficient to meet the amount of such fines, then the government may apply 
the sum in their hands towards payment of the amount of such fines, and may recover 
the deficiency from the contractor in any action, suit or proceeding by way of 
information in any court of competent jurisdiction as a debt due by the contractor 
to the Crown as a liquidated amount, and any Order in Council fixing the amount of 
such deficiency shall be conclusive proof of the amount of such deficiency in any such 
action, suit or proceeding. 

Sec. 2.— If the contractors violate the condition herein mentioned against sub- 
letting, they sh dl not b3 entitled to receive any payment under the contract for work 
done by the sub-contractor, and the Minister of Militia and Defence may refuse to 
accept any work performed by a sub-contractor in violation of the prohibition herein 
contained against sub-letting. 

Sec. 3. — The wages to be paid in the execution of this contract shall be those 
generally accepted as current in each trade for competent workmen in the district 
where the work is carried on. If this condition is violated the Minister of Militia 
and Defence may cancel the contract and refuse to accept any work done thereunder, 
and the contractors will thereafter not be allowed to undertake any work for the 
Department of Militia and Defence. 

Sec. 4. — The factory, and the work there being performed under this contract, 
Bhall at all reasonable times be open to inspection by persons therefor authorized in 
writing by the Minister of Militia and Defence. 

Sec. 5. — Before being entitled to payment of any money which the contractors 
may from time to time claim to be due them under this contract, they shall file with the 
Minister of Militia and Defence in support of such claim a solemn statutory declaration 
of themselves and of such others as the Minister of Militia and Defence may indicate, 
testifying to the rates of w;i£res paid in execut'on of this contract, and to the manner 



58 



DEPARTiinXT OF LABOUR 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

in all other respects in which the provisions of this contract have been observed and 
the work performed, and generally setting forth such information as the Minister of 
Militia and Defence may require, and as will enable him to determine whether, and if 
so, in what respects any of the provisions of this contract may have been violated. In 
the case of the contrr ctors' absence from the country, their extreme illness, or death, but 
under no other circumstance, may such statutory declaration by the contractors per- 
sonally be dispensed with ; but nevertheless, such other statutory declarations as 
aforesaid as the Minister of Militia and Defence may call for, shall be so filed. 

Department ok Labour, Canada, 
Statistical Tahles. v, A.R.— No. 11. 

CONTRACTS AWARDED BY THK DEPARTMENT <>F MILITIA AND DEFEN< E DURING THE 
\_L YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1905, CONTAINING THK FAIR WAGES SCHEDULE 
AND OTHER CONDITIONS FOR THK PRUTKC TIOX < »F LABOUR. 



Date. 



1901. 
July 2nd. 






Hamilton . 



Montreal . 



Nature of Contract. 



2,350 Frocks, serge, scarlet. Cavalry. 

i 
500 

3,000 

400 

1,000 

2.2O0 



blue 

Artillery.. 

scarlet, Engineers. ^. 

Infantry 

rifle preen. Rifles 

blue. Army Service Corps. 
Medical " 
Ordnance store " 



t irtan. 



-. Pantaloons i ■ airy. 

250 
600 
250 
250 
500 

900 



cloth. Artillery 

serge 

Trousers, cloth, Infantry 

serge, Cavalry 

[nfantiy. 

Army Sen ice Corps. . 

tartan 

:*»i Tunics, cloth, scarlet, Cavalry 

500 " " bine. Artillery 

1,500 " " scarlet. Infantry 

1,00 1 " " rifle-green. Rifles 

n«i " '■ blue. Army Service Corps. . 

To " " " Ordnance Store Corps 

500 i 'loaks, graj . 

i.n" Froi -' een. Rifles 

tartan.. 

R,000Greal I o il - gray. 

1,000 " tartan 

.!««iv>rs. Pantaloons. Bedford Cord. 



Trousers, 



Toronto . 



serge. Cavalry 

cloth 

" 

Infantry 

Rifles. 

Army Service Corps. 
tartan. 
i Osetsl olonial saddles and bridles, complete — 
1,000 



1.500 

1IHI 

■_1<l 

3,000 
500 



INVESTIGATION OF COMPLAINTS AS TO NON-PAYMENT OF CURRENT RATES OF WAGES. \NP 
NON-PERFORMANCE "I CONDITIONS IX GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS. 



During the fiscal year 1904 06, 14 special ii ins were made by the Fair 

Wages officers of the Department of Labour into complaints received at the depart- 
from workmen to tin- effect that eonti rere not complying with the con- 

dition- for the protection of labour inserted in their contracts with the government. 
With three exceptions all of these complaints had reference to the alleged non- 

ent of the proper rates of wages, two complaint- were in regard t i alleged 
sive hours, and one had to do with alleged non-p for work done and mat 



REPORT OF THE DEF0T7 MXISTER OF LABOUR 59 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

supplied. The results of the investigations went to show that, except in 5 cases, the 
complaints were not well founded. In some instances the workmen were endeavour- 
ing to compel compliance with the union rate, which differed from the current rate 
payable in the locality at the time the contract was awarded, whereas the current rate 
was the one fixed in the schedule as the minimum below which contractors were not 
allowed by the terms of the Fair Wages schedule to go. In other cases the workmen 
were unable to produce evidence in support of the complaints alleged. 

In the case of the construction of the post office for the Public Works Depart- 
ment at Moosejaw in the North-west Territories, the department was informed that 
the contractor was paying only $1.50 per day to labourers engaged on the work of 
excavation, whereas the current rate in the locality, which was fixed in the schedule 
attached to the contract, as the minimum rate he was required to pay, was $2. One 
of the Fair Wages officers of the department was immediately sent to the locality and 
investigated the complaint upon the spot. He found that the contractor had been 
violating the terms of his contract, and recommended that he should be required to 
make good the difference between the amounts he had paid to the labourers and those 
which would have been paid them in the event of payment having been made in 
accordance with the terms of the contract. The claims were thereupon immediately 
adjusted by the contractor, who also undertook to see that the conditions of the con- 
tract for the protection of labour were not violated in the future. The earnings of 
some six labourers engaged on this work were increased as a result of this investi- 
gation. 

In connection with the building of a Royal Observatory for the government at 
Ottawa, a complaint was received at the department to the effect that $783.66 was due 
by the contractor for work done and materials supplied. On this complaint being 
investigated and the attention of the Department of Public Works drawn to the same, 
the latter department deducted from the final estimate to be paid the contractor for 
the work the sum of $3,000 until proof was given that the claim had been satisfac- 
torily settled. 

In the construction of a lighthouse at Jeannette's Creek, in Ontario, the Depart- 
ment of Marine and Fisheries undertook, at the instance of the Department of 
Labour, to see that the contractor who had been awarded the contract for this build- 
ing adjusted, without delay, a claim of $172.50 for wages due to workmen who had 
been engaged upon the work, and who had made known to the Department of Labour 
the fact that this amount was still due to them on account of wages for work per- 
formed. 

Similarly, the Department of Railways and Canals undertook to see that the con- 
tractors for the Niagara street bridge over the Welland canal adhered strictly to the 
rates of wages set forth in the schedule attached to their contract, which the Depart- 
ment of Labour had been informed titty had not been strictly adhering to. 

The workmen employed on the fortifications at Quebec complained during the 
year to the Department of Labour that they were receiving only 124 cents per hour 
per day of 10 hours, instead of 15 cents per hour per day of 9 hours, as had formerly 



60 DEPART11EXT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

been paid them. The attention of the Department of Militia and Defence having 
been drawn to this complaint by fhe Department of Labour, the former department 
gave instructions requiring the restoration of the former rate of wages as requested. 
Inasmuch as the Fair Wages policy of the government has come to be pretty 
generally known, both by employers and workmen throughout the Dominion, it is to 
be assumed, from the few complaints which have been received at the Department of 
Labour, that contractors have complied pretty faithfully w!th the conditions inserted 
in their contracts for the protection of labour. This is no doubt due in large measure 
to the publicity given to these terms by the publication in the Labour Gazette of the 
Fair Wages schedules attached to contracts and also to the knowledge of the existence 
and terms of these schedules gained through the presence of one of the Fair Wages 
officers of the department in the locality at the time the schedule is prepared. Inas- 
much, moreover, as the Fair Wages officers consult with both contractors and work- 
men in preparing schedules, each party is made aware at the outset of the conditions 
which are to govern the work, and as each is given in this way some opportunity of 
making representations as to what the current rates and hours actually are, the possi- 
bility of disputes arising after a contract has been signed is considerably minimized. 

The Fair Wages officers of the department are of the opinion that the possibility 
of contractors evading the terms of their contracts, would be still further minimized, 
and the likelihood of complaints proportionately reduced, if contractors were com- 
pelled to post in a conspicuous place on the public works under construction the terms 
and conditions of the contract framed for the protection of those in their employ; 
also, were contractors obliged to keep a record in books kept for the purpose of pay- 
ments made to workmen in their employ, such books to be open for inspection by the 
Fair Wages officers of the government at any time that it might seem expedient to 
any Minister of the Crown, and in particular the Minister of Labour, to have the same 
inspected. If these recommendations, as well as the recommendations made in the 
report of the Deputy Minister of Labour for the year ended June 30, 1904, were 
adopted, it is believed that the fullest effect would be given to the Fair Wages resolu- 
tion of the House of Commons of March, 1900, in furtherance of which resolution 
these conditions have been framed. 

The following table will show the nature of the investigations which have been 
made by the Fair Wages Officers of the Department of Labour during the year ended 
June 30, 1905, into complaints received by the department, nature of claims presented, 
the department of the government affected, and disposition made of these claims : — 



REPORT OF TEE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 



61 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



2d i 

■ X 

-< _ 


q 

.2 

7" 

I 


1 = 

- 

O £ 


Z 




|| 

.»- z 
-- - 

~ Z 

5 r 

— "1 




& X 


X — — • 

C I z 


Q Z 
I — 

">.Z 




3 

3D 


~ z 
.i - z 

- z 
= a >• 

5." v 

DO ^ ° 

::: 


o 


on *j 

33 3 

- - 


E c 

r. 


r 


z 






00 


Department ok Labou 
Statistical Tables, v. 

1 TIIK YKAK ENDED .1 


i — 

< 


a 
/ 

e 




c r 

— ^ 

g <3 a 


c 

si 

sll 

■-a 


© c a § e 

.i i = . r 

"- - — — -z - 
o'doo'SS 




CD 
O 

s 
o 


2 .S- 

S at _ 

tf 5c"-S 

'- ~ ~~ _, 

|?S . - 

>.— _^ 

— i= I ^ 


33 S 

p . ' 

Z5— S 




s 

r 
•~ 

z 
- 

p 


- 

o 

39 — 

" 3 

--Z 

7 = 






X 

9 

O 

a 

o 

"IT 

p 
pa 




•— — 


3 


i 


- — ^ r 


z 


r£ 


= = 


-~ - 

- - z 

- x - 

— — — 

- - - 

— — z 
Z c - 

J-'~ - 


si 


r z 




zf 


r. 






C 


- 
_2 


? - c » 


- 
a 

DC 

IB 

U 

: 

go 

< 


C 

z . 
3 

ft 

- J. 

u 

-- 

z> 
zi 

S 

H 
<1 




- 

s 

2 


5 


»J - ,z 

— - • t; 

i - £ - 


ID 

/ 
bf 

X 


- C o 
. — - 3 C 

- — ~ 29 
go o g 

£ _ - ~ Z - 
iZ z z z. ^ 


z « 

r S3 

— ■- 


III 
■ c-~ 

IS| 

Sjeo 

— ■„ ■* ^ 

- - — r- 

-z.r-P § 




ll 

If. 

— ^ 

Q II 

z " 

.z — 

-1 


£ 

— ~ 

z. > 

— - 




2-1 

. - z z 

z >. h 


z 
IS 

Z 

2 
- 


+3 

D 
3 

H 
Ti 

•_ 


- _ - 1 1 
S S § |.| 

I lg-| 1 ,■ 

=-£ - S 

— " ~~ ~~~z 


- 


si 


s 


3 
x 


5 S a § 


II 


" H" - - ^ = ^ 
c 3 z — ~ z — 


— - — 

c r - 


i-gl 


|1|| 




:~ 


!= = 




Z H Z 
C - - 


Z 


s 






D 






D 




a 


Q 


o 




o 




P 


< 




O 






«1 


< 

> 
- 

% 

X 

V 

c 

f- 


B 

43 

~7 



> 


- 

P 
O 



X 

3D 

a 

3 
O 

— — 
rz — 








b£ 


it - 

— — / 

- = I 


- o 


— ^ - 

~" ^ 

= 7 s 
°'=o 

I — 

§« s 


H -" 
-7. t~~ 

Z >. 

x H 
09 O 

> 

ii-r 

z - 


.E > 
-; 

.- Z 

2 ;^ 

- :. . 

. - - M 

So = ? 




z 

9 


- S3 

~ 

"~I - 
2 if 




- - - 

* z- 
is- 

;:" 

; ■- - 

/ =- 
go* 

z "- 
I 

- ; 1 
^ biz 

- _ -r 


;;- 

J>20 

bog | 

_ ~ 
zt u'B 

- - _ 

g CO 


< 
2 

71 

> 

— 


— 
o 

3 
X 


fl 










^ — - 
- ~ ~ 


3 d 

Z 


_ = _- St. „ S B 
.---:' - -£ ; i - = 

- 7 r - : r_ : - - 

— - - ~. ~ z - " ~ - 

^ — _ 7 ? - = - * • 




ZL 


41 




Ilia 

z -^ ^ 
; x — 

" - ~ '- 




i. 




gg 

w 






J; ic-— 


5 




- r^ 


g'3« 


2 - — 






| 


Jill 










cc 








H 




r- 


H 


E-t 


r- 


H 




w 


Eh 




c- 








£- 


*J 


X 






















»U 


— 












tJ 


J* 
























= 












^ 


£— " 


3 






















ri s 


c8 












90 


r- 

;_ - 


e 






: 






= 


: 


: 


: 




- 
*- 

-- ■- 


> 2 




- 






: 


~ 


^ =; 


3 






















-;- 


rr ^ 














P 


^_ 






















I" 


- - 














'ti 






= ? 




t 




I 


•3 


•= 


ti 




44 






— ' s 

= > 






» 

p 


< 

V. 



g 

= 


m 


_2£ 
= — 










V. 

f. 




= 5 


y.r. 

s 


* 5 

y~. 

7- 




1 E 

C3 

— ^i 

B Z 

s 


SSI 


~ ? 

. ft 

= z 

r 
— z 




30) 


_j 


x 






r 




-' 


3> 


d 


■d 


•i 




rf 


:± 




«3 






3 


- 


2 5 


«* 






r 




.-- 


35 


rf 


r 


- 




i-" 


?i 




BO 






-■ 


PC 


» 'i 


u 






^ 








■ 


■ 


>> 






^; 










>! 


g ■ 


a 

- 


< 






?. 




^, 


^ 


O 






S 




il 


s 




^ 






S 



62 



DEPA.RT1IEXT OF LABOUR 



5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 



a 
v. 

- 



5 
- 



- 
- 
i 

K 
CS 
Q 
V 
< 

« 
S 

- 



z 
~ 
i. 

- 
- 

Eh 









QJ5 

PS r: 



3 2 li 

■' - - 

■ - :r. 

= "' = 



_ ~ y 

~ — ~ ii 






£~ 



- :- - k - 






Scesoe 



^ :, 






C 


= = 3 


r z -~ 







|*a . 


- /- 

~ 5 
c o 


■gsp 


=| 1 3. 
-.;: 5 bi 


OJ5 


Bg° 


= 


-" 




c > 






- ; 


C- 


— ^ ^_z 


a - 
-i 

c bo 

z - 


|| 

O O " 










Ij c / 


T ~ — 
Sfao'cO 

"3 - - 1 


~ -: 


z •-- 


















u 


5 — - — - 












Eh 


'— 


r- 



- _ 
















| - 


:. 






ofta 


So 














- 


1 










= 


:-i 










o 


fa 


- 








— 


— 


S* 


Jl 




r a 
32 







s 




a 

ublit 


• -J 

11 


=-7 


bin: 


ft 




s a 


- t - 


■a 


Hi 




5 


S p 


id 


?; 


s 


— a 


3 


■i. 



V 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 63 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 



IV. THE RAILWAY LABOUR DISPUTES ACT* 

When the Railway Labour Disputes Act was enacted on July 12, 1903, it was 
believed that the measure, providing, as it did, the machinery whereby a public inquiry 
might be made under oath as to the causes underlying any difference between a rail- 
way company and any of its employees, with a view to bringing about an adjustment 
of these differences, the mere existence of the measure would of itself be a means of 
averting strikes and lockouts on the railways of the Dominion. That the expectation 
of parliament in this regard has been thus far realized is well evidenced from the fact 
that since the passing of the Act (now. two years ago) there has not been a single 
strike on any of the railroads of the Dominion of such a nature as to seriously affect 
transportation. There has, moreover, been occasion to apply the Act only in the case 
of one dispute, and in this case its efficacy as a means of preventing strikes and lock- 
outs has been well proven, inasmuch as but for the reference a serious strike among 
an important class of employees would have taken place over the greater part of the 
systems of one of the largest railway companies in Canada. Xot only was a strike 
averted, but the differences themselves, in the opinion of the parties who had requested 
the application of the Act, were adjusted as a direct consequence of the reference. The 
success of the measure as a means of preserving industrial peace has, therefore, been 
shown by the prevention of a strike in the only case thus far referred under its pro- 
visions, and in the absence of the necessity for reference in any other cases. 

REFERENCE OF DISPUTE BETWEEN GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY COMPANY A^D TELEGRAPHERS. 

The dispute referred during the year 1904-05, under the Railway Labour Disputes 
Act, i") was that between the Grand Trunk Railway Company and certain of its tele- 
graphers, which had arisen through demands for the payment of Sunday work, the 
allowance of an annual vacation without loss of time, and an increase in minimum 
salaries, which the Grand Trunk had refused to concede to the telegraphers in its 
employ. The difficulties between the company and its employees in regard to these 
matters originated in May, 1903, and in April, 1904, an appeal was made to the Hon- 
ourable the Minister of Labour for a reference of these difficulties to a Board of Ar- 
bitration under the Act. Before applying the provisions of the Act the Honourable 
the Minister of Labour arranged a further conference between the parties, in the hope 
that the difficulties might be amicably adjusted between them. The parties failing, 
however, to come to any settlement, and the department being assured that a strike 
would take place forthwith on the lines of the company unless some adjustment were 

brought about, the Minister of Labour took strj>> t ntitute a conciliation committee 

under the Act. The action of the Minister was taken under the section of the Act+ 

• For an account of the steps leading up to the passing of this Act, as well as for an account 
of its nature and provisions, see Annual Report of the Department of Labour for the year 
ended June 30, 1903, p. 58, and Annual Report of Department of Labour for the year ended June 
30, 1904, p. 71. 

in.) Statutes of Canada, 3 Edw. VII., Chap, 55. 

t Sec. 3. 



64 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

which provides that whenever a difference exists between a railway company and its 
employees, and it appears to the Minister that a strike is likely to occur with con- 
sequent loss or danger to the public or employees of the railway, the Minister may 
cause an inquiry to be made into the difference and the cause of it by a committee 
of conciliation, mediation and investigation. The committee is to be composed of 
three members, one each being named by the employers and the employees who are 
parties to the difference, and the third, who is to act as chairman, by the two so 
nominated, or by the parties themselves if they can agree, the Minister being em- 
powered to appoint the third or other members of the committee, in case the parties 
themselves fail to agree or appoint. The duty of the committee is, briefly, to assist in 
bringing about an amicable settlement to the satisfaction of both parties, and to report 
its proceedings to the Minister of Labour, the latter being empowered, in case of the 
failure of the committee, to further refer the difference to arbitration under terras set 
forth in the Act.§ 

REFERENCE UNDER THE ACT. 

The Minister of Labour, in ordering the establishment of a committee of concili- 
ation for the settlement of a railway labour dispute, is required to notify each party 
to the difference in writing to name a member of this committee, fixing a time in the 
notice not later than five days after its receipt within which the appointment is to be 
made.* In the present case notice was served on the Grand Trunk Railway Company 
and on the telegraphers on July 21, and July 26 was named as the date prior to which 
the appointments had to be made. The full text of the -notice served was as follows : — 

Department of Labour, Canada, 

Ottawa, July 21, 1904. 

Notice is hereby given to the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada, herein- 
after called ' the Company,' and to certain telegraphers employed by the said company, 
hereinafter called ' the Telegraphers,' and hereinafter more particularly referred to ; 

That it has been made to appear to me that a difference exists between the said 
company and tin- said telegraphers, being the employees of the said company; 

That the said company and the said telegraphers are unable satisfactorily to ad- 
just the said differs 

That by reason of such difference remaining unadjusted a strike on the line of 
railway of the said company is likely to be caused, or that the regular and safe trans- 
portation of mails, passengers or freight may be interrupted, or that the safety of any 
person or persons employed on any train or car of the company is likely to be endan- 
gered ; 

That application has been made to me on behalf of the said telegraphers to catise 
an inquiry to be made into the said difference and the cause thereof, and for that pur- 
pose to establish a committee of conciliation, mediation and investigation, to be com- 
posed of three persons to be named in the manner provided by the Railway Labour Dis- 
putes Act, 1903 ; 

That I have decided to cause such inquiry to be made into the said difference, and 
the cause thereof, and for that purpose to establish euch committee. 

J Sees. 4 and 5. 

• 3 Edward VII., chap. 56, sec. 3. 



REPORT OF TEE DEPUTY MIMSTER OF LABOUR 65 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

I, therefore, hereby notify the Grand Trunk Railway Company to name to me a 
member of the said committee on or before the 26th day of July, 1904. 

And I also hereby notify the telegraphers to name to me a member of the said 
committee on or before the 26th day of July, 1904. 

(Sgd) WILLIAM MULOCK, 

Minister of Labour. 

Two copies of the above notice were sent to representatives of the company and of 
the telegraphers, with a request in each case that one copy be returned ta the Depart- 
ment of Labour endorsed with the acceptance of the party on whom it had been served, 
the duplicate original being retained. In both cases the service in question was duly 
accepted. 

A communication was received from the telegraphers on July 22, notifying the 
department that they had appointed Mr. J. H. Hall, Ottawa, Ont., as their represen- 
tative on the conciliation committee, and the company on July 26 named Mr. Geo. F. 
Bhepley, K.O., Toronto, as its representative. 

Xotices were sent by the department to both of the persons named, informing them 
of the appointments to the committee, and requesting that they should meet at the 
Department of Labour, Ottawa, on Friday, July 29, for the purpose of appointing the 
third member of the committee. The parties to the dispute themselves were also noti- 
fied on the same day to a like effect. 

Some delay was caused, through the absence of one of the parties, in arranging for 
the appointment of a third member of the Conciliation Committee. On August S, 
however, at a joint meeting at Toronto, the representatives appointed by the Grand 
Trunk Railway Company and telegraphers, respectively, as members of the Concilia- 
tion Committee, agreed upon the Honourable Mr. Justice Teetzel, of Hamilton, as the 
third member and chairman of the Conciliation Committee. 

Judge Teetzel was absent at the time in British Columbia, but being communi- 
cated with by wire by the department, accepted the appointment and arranged to meet 
with the other members of the Conciliation Committee at Toronto, on Monday, 
August 22. 

■ On August 22 and 23 the committee met at Toronto, and endeavoured to arrange 
an amicable settlement of the differences, through representatives of the parties to the 
dispute who appeared before the committee. The committee conducted its proceedings 
in private, but were unable to effect a settlement. The committee thereupon submitted 
the following report to the Honourable the Minister of Labour: — 

Toronto, August 24, 1904. 
To the Honourable Sir William Mulock, 
Minister of Labour, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Honourabee Sir, — In the matter of the Railway Labour Disputes Act, 1903, and 
in the matter of the reference of certain differences between the Grand Trunk Rail- 
way Company and its telegraphers, to the undersigned, as a conciliation committee 
under the provisions of the said Act, 

36—5 



66 ' DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

Your committee respectfully begs to report that on trie 22nd and 23rd days of 
August, instant, in the presence of F. H. McGuigan, manager of the said railway; 
W. W. Pope, solicitors' clerk ; George C. Jones, superintendent Midland division, re- 
presenting said railway company; and D. Campbell, third vice-president of the Order 
of Railway Telegraphers; D. M. Kennedy and W. Faskin, telegraphers, representing 
the telegraphers in the employment of the said railway company, your committee en- 
deavoured by conciliation and mediation to assist in bringing about an amicable settle- 
ment of said differences to the satisfaction of both parties, but your committee was 
unable to effect such a settlement. 

Your obedient servants, 

(Sgd) J. Y. TEETZEL, 

Chairman of Conciliation Committee. 
(Sgd) J. H. HALL, 
Member named by Telegraphers, Employees of said Company. 
(Sgd) GEO. F. SHEPLEY, 
Member named by Grand Trunk Railway Company. 

Having been notified by the Conciliation Committee of its inability to effect an 
amicable settlement of the differences between the Grand Trunk Railway Company 
and its telegraphers, the Honourable the Minister of Labour decided to refer these dif- 
ferences to a board of arbitrators under the Act, and the parties were requested to 
signify whether or not they were willing to accept as representatives on a board of 
arbitration the persons who had been their representatives on the Conciliation Com- 
mittee; also as to whether or not the chairman of the Conciliation Committee would 
be mutually acceptable as chairman of a board of arbitrators. 

Each of the parties having expressed a desire to have their representatives on the 
Conciliation Committee act as their representatives on the Board of Arbitrators, and 
having agreed to the chairman of the Conciliation Committee being the chairman of 
the Board of Arbitration, the Minister of Labour, by an order of August 27, established 
the board to be composed of His Honour J. V. Teetzel, J. H. Hall. Esq., and George 
F. Shepley, Esq., K.C., with all powers and duties conferred upon the board by the 
Railway Labour Disputes' Act, 1903, in reference to the differences as referred to them. 

The order establishing the Board of Arbitrators v.:;- a- follows: — 

Department of Labour, Canada. 

In the matter of the Railway Labour Disputes Act, 1903, and in the matter of cer- 
tain differences between the Grand Trunk Railway Company of Canada and certain of 
its telegraphers. 

Whereas under the provisions of the said Ael 'lie said differences were referred to 
a committee of conciliation, mediation and investigation, composed of the Eonourable 

Mr. Justice Teetzel, J. H. Hall. Esq., and < leorgo V. Shepley. Ksq., K.C., and that the 

committee was unable to effect an amicable settlement, and I hat. therefore, the Honour- 
able William Mulock, Minister of Labour, decided to refer said differences to arbitra- 
tion under the provisions of the said Ac1 ; 

And whereas the telegraphers have named •! . II. Hall, Esq., to be a member n( the 
said Board of Arbitrators, and the said company have named the said George F. 
Shepley, Esq.. K.i '.. to be a member of the said Board of Arbitrators, and the said tele- 
graphers and the said company have agreed in naming the Honourable Mr. Justice 
Teetzel to be the third member of such hoard : 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 67 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Now, therefore, it is witnessed that the said minister hereby establishes the said 
Board of Arbitrators to be composed of the said J. H. Hall, George F. Shepley, and 
the Honourable J. Y. Teetzel, the last named to be the third member of the said board 
and chairman thereof, with all the powers and duties of the said Act conferred upon 
them in respect of the differences so referred to them. 

In witness whereof the said minister hath hereunto set his hand and seal of office 
this 27th day of August, A.D. 1904. 

(Sgd.) W. MULOCK, 
(Seal) Minister of Labour. 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE BOARD. 

Immediately after the establishment of the board, the parties to the difference 
were notified of its establishment, and it was expected that the board would immedi- 
ately enter upon its duties. 

The section of the Eailway Labour Disputes' Act setting forth the duties of the 
board is as follows : — ■ 

10. Forthwith after the appointment of the board the chairman shall promptly 
convene the same, and the board shall in such manner as it thinks advisable make thor- 
ough, careful and expeditious inquiry into all the facts and circumstances connected 
with the difference and the cause thereof, and shall consider what would be reasonable 
and proper to be done by both or either of the parties with a view to putting an end 
to the difference, and to preventing its recurrence, and shall with all reasonable speed 
make to the minister a written report setting forth the various proceedings and steps 
taken by the board for the purpose of fully and correctly ascertaining all the facts and 
circumstances, and also setting forth said facts and circumstances, and its findings 
therefrom, including the cause of the difference and the board's recommendations, with 
a view to its removal and the prevention of its recurrence. 

Other sections of the Railway Labour Disputes Act which are of interest as refer- 
ring to the powers of the board and the manner of proceedings are as follows : — 

13. For the purpose of such inquiry the board shall have all the power of sum- 
moning before it any witnesses, and of requiring them to give evidence on oath, or on 
solemn affirmation, if they are persons entitled to affirm in civil matters, and produce 
such documents and things as the board deems requisite to the full investigation of the 
matters into which it is inquiring, and shall have the same power to enforce the at- 
tendance of witnesses and to compel them to give evidence as is vested in any court 
of record in civil cases; but no such witness shall be compelled to answer any question 
by his answer to which he might render himself liable to a criminal prosecution. 

19. No counsel or solicitor shall be entitled to appear before the board except with 
the consent of all parties to the difference, and, notwithstanding such consent, the board 
may, if it deems it advisable, decline to allow counsel or solicitors to appear before it. 
The parties to the difference may appear in person or by agents. 

21. Where the difference which is being inquired into affects a class of empl< 

it shall not be necessary for them all to take part in the inquiry, but the class may be 
represented by a limited number chosen by a majority, or by agents other than counsel 
or solicitor. 

22. If, in any proceedings before the board, any person wilfully insults any mem- 
ber of the board, "r wilfully interrupts the proceedings, nr with cause refuses 
to give evidence, or is guilty in any manner of any unlawful contempt in the face of 
the board, it shall be lawful for any other member of the board or constable to take the 



68 DEPARTHEXT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

person ■ Sending into custody, and remove him from the precincts of the board and 
retain him in custody until the rising of the board. 

23. It shall be in the discretion of the board to conduct its proceedings in public 
or in private. 

The board of arbitration held its opening meeting at Toronto, on September 19, 
delay in commencing the taKing of evidence having been agreed to by the parties, 
owing to the engagement of His Honour Judge Teetzel, chairman of the board. 

At the opening meeting a question was raised as to whether counsel should be per- 
mitted to represent the parties to the arbitration before the board. Objection was 
taken by the representatives of the telegraphers, and the chairman, under section 19 
of the Act, which provides that ' No counsel shall be entitled to appear before the board 
except with the consent of the parties to the difference,' sustained the objection. 

The question of fixing a date from which the decision of the board should take 
effect was discussed, but was left in abeyance. 

The procedure to be followed in presenting the evidence was also discussed. The 
board then adjourned to convene again at the call of the chairman. 

On September 23 an informal meeting of the board was held, but owing to the 
absence of the company's agents the sitting was adjourned until the following day, 
■when proceedings were resumed at the city hall, Toronto. 

It was decided by the chairman that the meetings should be open to the public. 

Mr. D. Campbell, third vice-president of the Order of Railroad Telegraphers, sub- 
mitted a statement of claims on behalf of the telegraphers, addressing the board in 
this connection. 

The board then adjourned until October 13. 

CLAIMS OF TELEGRAPHERS. 

The statement setting for the claims of the telegraphers was in the form of twenty- 
five proposed rules and rates of pay to govern the telegraphers employed on the Grand 
Trunk Railway system. Briefly stated the more important demands of the telegraphers 
as therein presented were as follows: — 

The term ' telegrapher ' to include any employee performing telegraph duties of 
any character by assignment of proper authority. 

Telegraphers not to be suspended or discharged without just cause; any charges 
to be in writing and to be duly tried within fifteen days. If found guilty suspension 
to commence at the time the employee was relieved for trial ; if discharged the reasons 
to be clearly stated in writing and no loss of time to be incurred by the employee. 

No discrimination to be made against members of the Order of Railroad Tele- 
graphers. Free transportation to be allowed telegraphers over their division and time 
allowed in which to attend meetings in as far as consistent with good service. 

A letter stating term and efficiency of service to be given to telegraphers leaving 
the service. 



REPORT OF TEE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 



69 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

Promotion to be governed by merit and ability, seniority having the preference 
■where ability is sufficient, and senior telegraphers to be retained in the case of a reduc- 
tion in staff. 

Free transportation for family and household goods to be granted in case of trans- 
fer. 

Telegraphers called from duty at the request of the company to receive the same 
compensation as if on duty. 

Regular wages to be paid telegraphers performing duty at wrecks or in other emer- 
gencies. 

Certain classes of employment, such as conveying mails, teaching telegraphy, clean- 
ing stations, &c, not to be required of telegraphers. 

Four dollars per month to be paid telegraphers who are required to attend six or 
less switches or semaphores lights, with fifty cents per month for each additional light. 

Telegraphers not to be required to work on Sundays or legal holidays except when 
absolutely necessary to the company's interest, pay in such cases to be at overtime 
rates. 

Telegraphers handling express business to receive the usual commission. 

Not more than twelve consecutive hours, including meal hours, to constitute a 
day's work. Nine consecutive hours to constitute a day's work at certain specified 
stations. 

Overtime in no case to be paid less than twenty-five cents per hour. Emergency 
calls to be paid at fifty cents per hour. Employees to have eight consecutive hours off 
<Juty in each twenty-four. 

All branch line telegraphers required to be on duty beyond twelve consecutive 
hours to be compensated for the inconvenience at a fixed scale. 

After four years' service two weeks leave of absence to be granted annually with 
full pay and free transportation for themselves and families to any point on the 
system. 



The following minimum salaries to be paid : 





East of Detroit and St. 


West of Detroit and St 




Clair Hi- i 


Clair Ri\ ers. 




M. Line-. 


B. Lines. 


M. Lines. 


B. Lines. 


Agents with dwelling fuel and light 


s .v ) CO 


s j; oo 


- 5 00 


S 5-.' 00 


Agent without dwelling, fuel and light 








60 00 






17 00 






ring agents or telegraphers relieving 
agents fiftj cents per day extra forcxpi 




60 00 







PROCEEDINGS OF THE BOARD OF ARBITRATORS. 



Sittings of the Board of Arbitrators were continued during October in the city 
hall, Toronto, on the 14th, 15th, 21st and 22nd of the month. 

At the meeting of the board held on October 14 it was decided that proceedings 
should not be conducted in public, the statement made by His Honour Judge Teetzel 
on the opening of the session being as follows : — 

Section 16 of the Railway Labour Disputes Act expressly prohibits the making 
public of any books, papers and other documents used by this board or any information 
obtained therefrom. As a good deal of this inquiry will involve the use of books, papers 



70 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

and documents prohibited by this section from being made public, and for other rea- 
sons, the majority of the board have decided that, under the provisions of the Act and 
the prohibitory section as to a certain portion of the information being kept private, 
it is better to have all private, so that reporters will please not join with us. When 
the award is made it will be complete and consist of all the necessary facts from which 
the public will be able to judge whether the award is reasonable or not, and the in- 
formation will be given in a more concrete form and permanent way than it would be 
otherwise. 

The scope of the arbitration was then taken into consideration, and it was decided 
that only sections 13, 22 and 23 in the schedule of demands presented by the tele- 
graphers would be dealt with, it having been intimated that the other sections of the 
schedule had been so amended as to be acceptable to both parties. Article No. 13 was 
to the effect that telegraphers be not required to work on Sundays and the following 
legal holidays, namely, New Year's Day, Dominion Day in Canada, 4th of July in the 
United States, Labour Day or Christmas Day, except when absolutely necessary to 
protect the company's interests. Sunday labour to be paid at overtime rates. Article 
22 was to the effect that two consecutive weeks' leave of absence annually with full 
pay and free transportation be given to telegraphers for themselves and families to any 
point on the system. Article 23 related to minimum salaries. 

In proceeding upon this basis the right was reserved by the telegraphers to pre- 
sent later an argument with regard to their demands as a whole. 

The remaining sessions of the board during October were devoted to the examina- 
tion of witnesses produced by the telegraphers, the filing of exhibits, &c. 

During November sittings were held in the city hall, Toronto, on the 16th, 17th 
and 24th of the month. 

At the session of the board held on November 16 and 17, the examination of wit- 
nesses called by the telegraphers was concluded. A conference between the Honour- 
able the Minister of Labour and the arbitrators took place on the latter date, with 
reference to the scope of the inquiry to be conducted by the board. It had been de- 
cided by the board, at the session of October 14, to deal only with the questions of 
minimum wages, annual leave and Sunday labour, as set forth in sections 13, 22 and 23 
of the schedule of grievances presented by the telegraphers, on the ground that it had 
been admitted by the telegraphers that the remaining sections had been already dealt 
with. The Minister of Labour was of the opinion that all sections of the telegraphers' 
schedule of grievances should b<> taken into consideration by the arbitrators. At the 
conclusion of the conference it was announced that the scope of the inquiry would be 
limited as at first determined, and that the discussion would not he regarded as form- 
ing a part of the proceedings of the board, the chairman stating that he would file 
with the evidence Inter his reasons in full for adhering to his original decision in the 
matter. 

At the session of November 24 the presentation of evidence by the company was 
begun, the tirst witness called being the master of transportation for the middle divi- 
sion of the Grand Trunk Railway system. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MIXISTER OF LABOUR 71 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

On December 28, and on the three remaining days of that month, morning and 
afternoon sessions of the board were held. The witnesses called were chiefly officials 
in the employ of the company. The examination of various books and papers of the 
company was an important feature of the proceedings. 

Sessions for the taking of evidence were held on the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th of Jan- 
uary. The examination of different witnesses called by the company occupied the 
attention of the board on the first three of the dates named, the case for the company 
being concluded on January 5. On the following day a number of witnesses called by 
the telegraphers in rebuttal of the evidence produced by the company were examined. 
The argument, as presented by Mr. D. Campbell, on behalf of the telegraphers, and Mr. 
W. W. Pope, on behalf of the company, was listened to by the board on the Tth of the 
month, on which date the final adjournment of the sessions for taking evidence was 
announced. 

AWARD OF THE BOARD OF ARBITRATORS. 

The award of the Board of Arbitrators was given out- on February 20, 1905.* It 
was signed by Mr. Justice Teetzel, the chairman of the board, and Mr. Harvey Hall, 
the representative of the telegraphers. Mr. Shepley, K.C., the representative of the 
company, presented a minority report. 

3 rion 12 of the Railway Labour Disputes, referring to the award of a Board of 

Arbitrators Act, is as follows : — 

12. For the information of parliament and the public, the report shall without 
delay be published in the Labour Gazette, and be included in the annual report of the 
Department of Labour to the Governor General. 

The following is a copy of the award, published in pursuance of the above section: 

In the matter of the Railway Labour Disputes Act, 1903, and in the matter of 
certain differences between the 3rand Trunk Railway Company and certain of 

its telegraphers. 

To all to whom these Presents may come, Greeting: 

Whereas, under the provisions of the said Act, the said differences were referred 
to a Committee of Conciliation, composed of Hon. J. V. Teetzel, J. H. Hall, Esq., and 
George F. Shepley, Esq., K.C., which committee being unable to effect an amicable 
settlement, the Hon. Sir William Mulock, Minister of Labour, referred the said differ- 
ences to arbitration, under the provisions of thesaidAct; and whereas, the telegraphers 
having named J. H. Hall, Esq.. to be a member of the said Board of Arbitration, and 
the said company having named the said George F. Shepley, Esq., K.C., to be a mem- 
ber of the said board, and the said telegraphers and the said company having agreed in 

• An account of the origin of the dispute and of its reference by the Hon. the Minister of 
Labour, under The Railway Labour Disputes Act, 1903, was published in the Labour Gazette 
for August, 1904, at page 168. The proceedings of the Conciliation Committee appointed under 
the Act, and the appointment and proceedings of the Board of Arbitrators during August, were 
reported in the Labour Gazette for September, 1904, at page 266. Subsequent proceedings of 
the board during September, October, November and December, 1904, and January, 1905, were 
reported in the October, November, December, January and February issues of the Gazette at 
pages 366, 500, 627, 747 and 869 respectively. 



72 DE FARTHEST OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

naming the said Hon. J. V. Teetzel to be the third member of the said board, the said 
Hon. Minister of Labour on August 27, 1904, established the said Board of Arbi- 
trators, to be composed of the said three parties, with all the powers and duties by the 
said Act conferred upon them in respect of the said differences so referred to them. 

Now know ye. that the said arbitrators having taken upon themselves the burden 
of the said reference, were attended by the said parties and their witnesses, and pro- 
ceeded to make a thorough and careful inquiry into all the facts and circumstances 
connected with the differences and the cause thereof, and having considered what 
would be reasonable and proper to be done by both or either of the said parties with a 
view to putting an end to the said differences and to preventing their recurrence. 

Therefore we. .T. V. Teetzel and J. H. Hall, being a majority of the said Board 
of Arbitrators, hereby respectfully report to the Hon. the Minister of Labour, pursuant 
to the provisions of section 10 of the sad Act, as follows: — 

(1.) At several meetings of the board between September 19, 1904, a"hd Janu- 
ary 7, 1905, fourteen witnesses were examined under oath on behalf of the telegraphers, 
and eleven on behalf of the company, and the evidence of such witnesses and the 
exhibits produced accompany this report. 

From such evidence and exhibits we find the following material facts and 
circumstances bearing upon the said differences and our findings thereupon, namely: 
that there are continuously in the employment of the said company an average of about 
seven hundred and fifty telegraphers, whose rights, duties and minimum pay were 
revised and actually agreed upon by representatives of the telegraphers and the com- 
pany in May, 1902, as appears by the schedule of rules and rates of pay which took 
effect on May 1, 1902, being Exhibit 17 in the evidence. 

That during the latter part of 1900. negotiations were begun between the repre- 
sentatives of the telegraphers and the company for the alteration and revision of the 
said schedule, which negotiations continued until July, 1904, and resulted in an agree- 
ment upon all but three of the items in the proposed new schedule, and that it was the 
il of the company to accede to the request of the telegraphers in reference to 
these three items that was the cause of the difference, for the adjustment of which the 
Conciliation Committee and the said Board of Arbitrators were appointed. The said 
items as I by the telegrahpers for acceptance are as follows: — 

ITEM 1. 

• Day operators and agents acting as day operators required to work on Sundays, 
except attending to regular passenger trains, will be paid extra, pro rata, on schedule 
of salary for such services, based on thirty days per month (any portion of an hour 
ban thirty minutes not to count, any portion of an hour thirty minutes or over to 
count as one hour), with a minimum compensation of twenty-five cents for each call 
for which one hour's service shall, if required, be rendered. All telegraphers are to 
report for d Sundays at their regular hours without extra compensation, when, 

required for work, other than to attend to regular passenger trains, they will be 
excused by proper authority.' 



'Telegraphers who have been in the employ of the company four or more conse- 
■cuti ed two wck-' leave of al ear with full pay. If 

the company find it inconv< if al no _■ the year to a tele- 

grapher entitled to it under the aboi he telegrapher shall, at his option, receive 

either i pensation at his regular salary for the period, or in the next year additional 

e of absence for a like period.' 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 73 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

ITEM 3. 

'The minimum salary shall be as follows: Agent and operator with dwelling, 
fuel and light on main line, $45 ; branch lines, $43 per month. Agent and operator 
without dwelling, fuel and light, on main line, $50; on branch lines, $45 per month. 
Telegraph operators, main line, $45 ; branch lines, $43 per month.' 

item 1. 

With reference to Sunday work, a provision, for many years has been in effect 
that telegraphers were not required to work on Sundays except when necessary to pro- 
tect the company's interests. On the main lines a great proportion of the telegraphers 
do considerable work beyond attending to regular passenger trains, but, except at pe- 
riods of the year when grain is being shipped, comparatively little Sunday work is done 
on the branch lines. All telegraphers are paid by a monthly salary, and while some 
allowance has been made by the company on account of Sunday work, in fixing the 
rates of pay, we do not think such allowance is adequate. The schediiles of pay fixed 
by the Michigan Central Railway Company and on the Intercolonial Railway allow 
extra pay for Sunday work by telegraphers, while on the Canadian Pacific Railway 
the schedule contains a provision in the exact words of item 1. We are of the opinion 
that a similar provision should be made by the Grand Trunk Railway. 

item 2. 

While there never has been any general provision whereby telegraphers have been 
entitled as of right to a vacation while in the company's service, we find that in the 
past the managers have not been unreasonable in allowing employees off duty with- 
out deducting pay, when they could arrange with other .employees to do their work 
and when the company's interests would not suffer. While the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way and the Intercolonial grant annually to their telegraphers two weeks' leave of 
absence with full pay, we do not consider the refusal of the company to accede to this 
request unreasonable, for if the men are adequately paid for the time they actually 
put in, the matter of granting leave of absence may be fairly left to be dealt with as 
in the past, upon individual application, and we think it should be left to the com- 
pany of its own motion to pay for services not actually performed. 

ITEM 3. 

On main lines the present minimum salary is five dollars, but on branch lines six 
dollars per month less than the amounts stated in item 3. The rates proposed in this 
item are exactly* the same as the rates paid on the Canadian Pacific Railway, under 
its schedule taking effect June 1, 1902, and on the Intercolonial in its schedule which 
took effect May 1, 1904. At present one hundred and thirty-seven telegraphers are in 
receipt of the present minimum pay, but the total who would be affected by the pro- 
posed increase would be two hundred and ninety-five, whose salaries would be respect- 
ively increased from seventeen cents to six dollars per month. The total increase 
the company's monthly pay roll for telegraphers in Canada, which now amounts to 
$34,434.11, would be $1,171.07. or an addition of about 3J per cent to the total. Of 
(he said two hundred and ninety-five, whose pay would be affected by the proposed in- 
crease, one hundred and seventy-two perform the duties of agent at a station as well 

as operator, and represent tl )mpany there in its freight and passenger business. 

At stations where one or two operators are employed, twelve hours, including meal 
hours, constitute a day's work. While the actual duties at many of the stations could 
be performed in two or three hours, if consolidated, the operator is required to be on 



74 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

duty, or within call, the whole Jay. While the duties are not onerous, they are ex- 
acting, and require great care and fair intelligence in their performance, and to be- 
come equipped as an operator one must serve an apprenticeship, without pay, for 
about one year. Having regard to these considerations, to<the general increase in the 
cost of living, to the general prosperity of the country, and to the fact that for more 
than two years the minimum wage for men in similar positions and performing 
similar duties on the Canadian Pacific Eailway has been the rate now proposed, we 
are of the opinion that the company should have granted the increase asked. 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 

With a view to the removal of the said differences and the prevention of their re- 
currence, we make the following recommendations : — 

Item 1. — Sunday pay. 

That paragraph 13 in the schedule of rules and rates issued by the manager of the 
Grand Trunk Railway Company on July 15, 1901, be struck out, and the following 
substituted therefor: — 

' Day operators and agents acting as day operators required to work on Sundays, 
except attending to regular passenger trains, will be paid extra pro rata on schedule 
of salary for such services based on thirty clays per month, (any portion of an hour 
less than thirty minutes not to count, any portion of an hour thirty minutes or over 
to count as one hour) with a minimum compensation of twenty-five cents for each 
call for which one hour's service shall, if required, be rendered. All telegraphers are 
to report for duty on Sundays at their regular hours without extra compensation, 
when, if not required for work other than to attend to regular passenger trains, they 
will be excused by proper authority.' 

Hem 2. — Leave of absence. 

That the telegraphers should withdraw and abandon their claim for leave of 
absence without pay. 

Item 8.— Minimum pay. 

That paragraph 21 of the said schedule, dated July 15, 1904, be amended by pro- 
viding that the minimum salary per month for agent and telegrapher with dwelling, 
fuel and light, on main line, shall be $45 per month, and on branch lines $43 per 
month, instead of $40 and $37, respectively, and that such minimum wage without 
dwelling, fuel and light, shall be $50 on main line and $48 on branch lines, instead 
of $45 and $42, respectively, and that the salary of all other telegraphers; who are not 
also agents, shall be $45 on main line and $43 on branch lines, instead of $40 and 
$37, respectively. In other respects the said paragraph 21 shall stand. 

We further recommend that the above recommendations shall take effect on 
March 1, 1905, and shall continue and be accepted by both parties for a period of three 
years thereafter. 

Witness our hands and seals this twentieth day of February, A.D. 1905. 

(Signed), J. V. TEETZEL, (L.S.) 
Witness, Chairman. 

(Signed), W. Walker Perry. (Signed), J. H. HALL. (L.S.) 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MIXISTER OF LABOUR 75 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

MINORITY REPORT. 

By a ruling of the board early in the history of the arbitration, the subject-matter 
of the arbitration was confined to three demands made by the telegraphers : — 

1. An increase in the minimum wage. 

2. Overtime pay for Sunday work. 

3. Two weeks' holidays with pay during each year, in certain cases with an alter- 
native of two weeks' extra pay. 

In my view, the duty which the arbitrators have to perform is a judicial duty. 
Under the tenth section of the Railway Labour Disputes Act, their duty is to ' consider 
what would be reasonable and proper to be done by either of the parties with a view 
to putting an end to the difference,' and to make their ' recommendations with a view- 
to its removal and the prevention of its recurrence.' 

It appears to me that our duty, therefore, is to consider whether it would be rea- 
sonable or proper for the company to make the concessions which the telegraphers 
demanded or any one or more of them, and to make our recommendations accordingly, 
and that duty, in my opinion, ought to be performed by a judicial application of legal 
principles. 

In this particular case we have not to determine the rights of the parties accord- 
ing- to the contract now existing between them, but if the dispute had been upon the 
construction of that contract, or upon an allegation that one party or the other had 
broken its provisions, we should, it must be conceded, have been compelled to interpret 
the contract in the one case to determine whether its provisions had been broken in 
the other, by the judicial application of legal principles of which I have spoken, and 
our functions cannot be made other than judicial by the nature of the dispute. If 
they are judicial in the cases supposed, they must equally be judicial in the case of the 
present, or indeed any dispute to which the statute is applied. 

The fundamental error in the majority award seems to me to be the departure of 
the majority of the board from judicial rules of conduct in dealing with the matters 
in dispute. 

There does not appear to me to be any reason for departing from certain well 
established, and indeed elementary, principles of law in conducting the inquiry and 
making the recommendations. The telegraphers are endeavouring to disturb the pre- 
sent status, and upon them, it seems clear, rests the burden of satisfying the arbitra- 
tors that the demands made are reasonable and proper to be conceded. 

If the dispute had arisen out of an attempt by the management to impose new 
terms upon the telegraphers, the burden of proof would, in my opinion, have similarly 
been upon the management, and in the absence of evidence clearly satisfying the board 
that the new terms were reasonable and proper to be imposed, it would, in my opinion, 
have been the duty of the board to recommend against the imposition of the proposed 
new terms. 

It also seems clear to me that our duty is to determine the questions raised upon 
a consideration of the evidence which has been placed before us. I do not see why 
the power to take evidence was conferred upon us if we are at liberty to make specu- 
lative recommendations without evidence. 

I have thought it proper to indicate my view of the principles upon which we 
should proceed, and in the departure from which I am unable to accompany the ma- 
jority of the board. 

With regard to the first demand, viz., an increase in the minimum rate of wage, 
three main considerations were advanced on behalf of the telegraphers. They were: — 

(a) That the increased cost of living had made the present minimum wage not 
a living wage. 

(6) That the duties and responsibilities of the men at the minimum stations had 
been substantially increased since the present minimum was fixed. 



76 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 

(c) That certain other roads, viz., the Canadian Pacific Railway, the Michigan 
Central Railway and the Intercolonial Railway had each fixed a minimum wage in 
excess of the Grand Trunk Railway minimum. 

The first inquiry then is: Is there evidence before the arbitrators which ought 
to satisfy them, judicially, that the existing minimum is, by reason of the increased 
if living, less than a fair living wage? In dealing with this inquiry it is proper 
to say that there is some general evidence that the cost of living has been generally 
increased, but that is only one step towards establishing the proposition put forward. 
There is no evidence whatever that any of the telegraphers who are receiving the mini- 
iii mil wage are not able to live fairly upon it, which is the other step. It was notice- 
able that men filling the minimum stations were not called to give evidence upon the 
subject. I do not see how we can say that, as a result of what has been proved and 
argued, the arbitrators are judicially satisfied upon the evidence that this first ground, 
put forward as making an increase reasonable and proper, has been established. 

With respect to the alleged increase in duty and responsibility, some attempt to 
establish such alleged increase was made, but the evidence was in itself far from con- 
vincing, and was completely met by the evidence given on behalf of the company. 

It does not appear to me that the fact that a higher minimum exists in the case 
of the other roads named is at all relevant, without proof that the conditions underly- 
ing the policies of the other roads named, in respect of the minimum wage, are sub- 
stantially similar to the conditions existing with regard to the same question between 
the Grand Trunk Railway Company and its telegraphers. No such evidence was 
offered, and it would, in my view, be the purest speculation to say, without any such 
evidence, that the minimum which was presumably fair in the one case is fair also 
in the other case. 

I .do not suppose that any person professing to exercise judicial functions would 
determine that A. ought to be paid the same wages as B. without having in evidence 
the circumstances which have brought about the fixing of B.'s wage. 

But, besides the absence of such proof, a comparison of the wages paid telegra- 
phers of all classes by the Grand Trunk Railway Company with those paid by the 
othei-s roads named, shows that the average wage paid by the former is at least as high 
a-, in ! ii i< apparently higher than the average wage paid by any of the other roads. 

With regard to the second demand, it was, during the early stages of the arbitra- 
tion, contended that the prevailing monthly wage fixed with reference to the fact that 
the telegraphers are, in some cases, required to work on Sunday, and it was alleged 
that when the change was made in 1S97 from the daily to the monthly method of pay- 
ment, the Sundays were added in to make the whole year, and added in at the then 
prevailing daily rate. Against this .however, it is to be said that the monthly rate 
prevailed in some portions of the Grand Trunk Railway system prior to the change, 
and in those cases the change does not seem to have had any effect. But, beyond this, 
I do not think that it was shown that full allowance was made for the added Sundays. 
In many and perhaps most cases there was some alteration to the benefit of those 
who did not then work on Sunday but were afterwards required to do so. It is ex- 
tremely difficult to measure this, and I do not think that, having regard to the daily 
rates of pay previously existing and to the monthly rates which took their place, it is 
shown that the monthly rates made adeqn ile allowance, in the majority of cases at all 
events, where Sunday work was afterwards for the first time required. 

I should have been prepared, therefore, to join in an award implementing the 
Sunday allowance in certain cases so as to make it adequate in the sense I have indi- 
cated. The award of the majority, however, seems to me to go too far. It applies 
the rule to all who work on Sunday, while, upon the evidence, those who were working 
on Sunday before the change and were paid by the day were paid for so working and 
continue to be so paid since the change. 

Aa the award, however, is not unanimous in other respects, and as I find myself, 
therefore, unable to sign it, this divergence of view does not affect the result. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR 



77 



SESSIONAL PAPER No. 36 

With regard to the demand for two weeks' vacation each year without loss of pay, 
this demand cannot, I think, be sustained upon the evidence. For the reasons which 
I have already indicated in dealing with the question of the minimum wage, I do not 
think the fact that some of the other companies give their telegraphers this privilege 
has, in the absence of the class of evidence to which I have there alluded, any rele- 
vancy. It does not appear to me to be reasonable and proper that this demand should 
be acceded to, and I understand that in this respect the arbitrators all agree. 

Dated February 20, 1905. 

(Signed), GEO. F. SHEPLET. 
Witness : 

(Signed), W. Walker Perry. 

The award of the Board of Arbitrators was forwarded to the Honourable the Min- 
ister of Labour by the chairman of the board, and duly certified copies were immedi- 
ately forwarded by the minister to the representatives of the parties to the disputes. 
Copies of the award were printed and distributed by the department to the press 
throughout the Dominion and to parties who made application for the same. The re- 
port was published at length in many of the newspapers of the Dominion, and com- 
mented upon or referred to in nearly all. In this way the public was given an oppor- 
tunity of forming an intelligent view of the questions at issue, and a definitely shaped 
public opinion brought to bear upon the parties, which it would have been difficult for 
them to have ignored. As already stated, there is nothing in the Railway Labour Dis- 
putes Act to compel the acceptance of an award of a board of arbitrators under the 
Act, save for the pressure of public opinion, as this may cause itself to be felt in con- 
sequence of the disclosures made by an investigation and the award of the arbitrators. 
In the case of this dispute between the Grand Trunk Railway Company and its tele- 
graphers, the award was not immediately accepted by the company, though the 
telegraphers were agreeable to its acceptance. It was followed, however, by further 
conferences between the representatives of the company and the telegraphers, which 
resulted in a two years' agreement being drawn up, which became effective on June 1, 
the most important feature of which was an increase in the minimum rate to be paid 
telegraphers by the company of $2.50 per month. 

The following is a statement of the minimum salaries per month before and after 
the change, as applicable to telegraphers in the employ of the Grand Trunk Railway 
Company on lines east of the Detroit and St. Clair rivers : — 



< 1\ Main Links. 



Prior to 
Change. 



Present 
Elate. 



On Branch Lines. 



Prior to 
Change. 



Present 
Kate, 



Agent and telegrapher with dwelling, fuel and light 
Agent and telegrapher without dwelling, fuel and light 

Telegraphers 

Relieving telegraphers or telegraphers relieving agents. 



$ eta 

I 

i. 

i 



? eta 

42 30 

i: so 

i ! 
70 0O 



| eta 

s 

12 I 
SI 00 



| r!<. 
- DO 

II 50 
:«i .'ii 
70 00 



A regular tel graphcr called away from home to reliev e a telegrapher will he paid a minimum rate of $5 
more than his regular salary. 



78 • DEPAKTUEXT Of LABOUR 

5-6 EDWARD VII., A. 1906 
Other clauses of the new schedule affecting wages and hours were as follows: — 

12. If telegraphers are required to attend switch or semaphore lamps, they will 
receive $4 per month for six or less such lights and 50 cents per month for each addi- 
tional switch or semaphore light at such station. Nothing in this article will relieve 
telegraphers from their responsibilities under the rules. 

13. Telegraphers will not be required to work on Sundays or the following legal 
holidays, viz. : New Year's Day. Dominion Day, Labour Day and Christmas Day. ex- 
cept when necessary to protect the company's interest. 

14. Company's dwellings occupied by telegraphers will be kept in good repair at 
the company's expense. 

15. Present arrangements of permitting telegraphers to accept commissions from 
express and telegraph companies doing business on the Grand Trunk premises will be 
continued. 

1C. At offices where one or two telegraphers are employed, twelve consecutive 
.htonirs, including meal hours, will constitute a day's work. At offices where more than 
two telegraphers are employed, ten consecutive hours, including meal hours, will con- 
stitute a day's work. 

A reasonable time will be granted for noon-day meal between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., 
or any other time when requested: failing to be granted such time, one hour overtime 
will be allowed. 

IT. Overtime will be computed pro rata on stared salary, but in no case less than 
25 cents per hour. 

A telegrapher will not be required, except in cases of emergency, to be on duty so 
as not to leave him eight consecutive hours off duty in the twenty-four. 

In computing overtime, less than thirty minutes will not be counted, thirty min- 
utes and less than sixty minutes will be considered an hour; special or emergency calls 
and up to one hour's service in connection therewith will be paid at 45 cents per call; 
after one hour overtime rate to